User:Visviva/NYT 20070220

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This is a list of lowercase non-hyphenated single words found in the 2007-02-20 issue of the New York Times which did not have English entries in the English Wiktionary when this list was created (2009-02-01).

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82128 tokens ‧ 60755 valid lowercase tokens ‧ 8329 types ‧ 47 (~ 0.564%) words before cleaning ‧ 

2007-02-20[edit]

  1. alstroemeria
    • 2007 February 20, Ellen Barry, “Eagerness and Some Resignation as Civil Union Law Takes Effect”, New York Times:
      Now they were doing it again: Waiting, with a bouquet of alstroemeria and purple tulips, for Asbury Park’s deputy city clerk, D. Kiki Tomek, to take their application for a civil union in New Jersey .
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  2. antinarcotics
    • 2007 February 20, Simon Romero, “Foreign Minister of Colombia Quits in Scandal”, New York Times:
      But the support for Mr. Uribe’s government is coming under fresh scrutiny as the United States Congress weighs approval of a trade agreement and a request from the Bush administration for $3.9 billion in military and antinarcotics assistance for Colombia, which is the largest recipient of American aid outside of the Middle East and Afghanistan.
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  3. churchwide
    • 2007 February 20, Laurie Goodstein, “Anglicans Rebuke U.S. Branch on Blessing Same-Sex Unions”, New York Times:
      Facing a possible churchwide schism, the Anglican Communion yesterday gave its Episcopal branch in the United States less than eight months to ban blessings of same-sex unions or risk a reduced role in the world’s third-largest Christian denomination.
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  4. concretians
  5. crimeless
  6. cryoglobulin
    • 2007 February 20, Jeremy Pearce, “Aaron Lerner, 86, Innovative Skin Doctor, Dies”, New York Times:
      Earlier, while still a graduate student, he and another researcher, G. Robert Greenberg, isolated a protein that appears in the blood at low temperature, a monoclonal antibody known as a cryoglobulin.
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  7. disinhibited
  8. disinhibition
  9. ectothermically
  10. glyphlike
  11. halfcourt
  12. homeotherm
    • 2007 February 20, Natalie Angier, “A Mammal in Winter With a Furnace of Her Own”, New York Times:
      I’d much rather celebrate the delights of being a warm-blooded homeotherm by visiting the splendid Hall of Mammals at the Smithsonian Institution ’s Museum of Natural History, which offers the added attraction of being splendidly indoors.
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  13. homeothermy
    • 2007 February 20, Natalie Angier, “A Mammal in Winter With a Furnace of Her Own”, New York Times:
      As always, however, there is no such thing as a free lunch, and we mammals must pay for the convenience of homeothermy by eating many extra lunches.
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  14. jumpstarted
    • 2007 February 20, Jon Pareles, “In New Orleans, Bands Struggle to Regain Footing”, New York Times:
      Through the years, school music programs have put horns, clarinets and drums into the hands of students who would never have played them otherwise, and high school connections have jumpstarted important New Orleans groups like the Rebirth Brass Band.
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  15. krewe
    • 2007 February 20, Jon Pareles, “In New Orleans, Bands Struggle to Regain Footing”, New York Times:
      St. Augustine is a historically black school, and its band integrated 20th-century Mardi Gras parades when they were invited in 1967 to appear with the Rex Organization, the top Mardi Gras krewe.
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  16. liberalizer
  17. mammaldom
  18. midocean
  19. minicamp
  20. moated
  21. movielike
    • 2007 February 20, Viv Bernstein, “Smoke Clears at Daytona, but Cloud Remains”, New York Times:
      The wrecks — including an upside-down slide across the finish line by Clint Bowyer in the No. 07 Chevrolet as sparks flew and the car caught fire — made for a movielike backdrop to the drama playing out between Harvick and Martin.
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  22. noncoordinated
    • 2007 February 20, Natalie Angier, “A Mammal in Winter With a Furnace of Her Own”, New York Times:
      Still another icebreaker is shivering, the automatic, noncoordinated activation of muscle motions for the sole purpose of generating heat.
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  23. nonreservation
    • 2007 February 20, Charles V. Bagli, “Spitzer Backs Plan for Indian Casino in Catskills”, New York Times:
      And the project still needs final approval by Interior Secretary Dirk Kempthorne, the former governor of Idaho, who opposes Indian casinos on nonreservation land.
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  24. officelike
    • 2007 February 20, Paul Vitello, “Retirees Find Their Place in the Sun, and the Snow”, New York Times:
      But one way or another, what many people seem to end up seeking is a kinder, gentler version of their former working life, an officelike setting of familiar faces and shared memory.
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  25. piloerector
    • 2007 February 20, Natalie Angier, “A Mammal in Winter With a Furnace of Her Own”, New York Times:
      Nor should we neglect that quintessentially mammalian trait, our hair, which, at the behest of tiny piloerector muscles at the base of each strand, can puff up to trap pockets of still air, one of the finest insulators known.
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  26. platemaker
    • 2007 February 20, Steven Heller, “Joseph Low, 95, Illustrator of Children’s Books, Dies”, New York Times:
      Working as the sole writer, editor, illustrator, platemaker, compositor, proofreader and pressman, he published limited editions of short stories and poetry, illustrated with his own wood and linoleum cuts.
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  27. proselytization
  28. resewn
    • 2007 February 20, Sarah Lyall, “A Winter’s Discontent, in Arabic”, New York Times:
      It is as if he has unpicked the intricate stitches in “Richard III” and resewn them into a garment of different colors and textures altogether.
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  29. rodentlike
    • 2007 February 20, Natalie Angier, “A Mammal in Winter With a Furnace of Her Own”, New York Times:
      The first mammals were small, nocturnal, rodentlike creatures that skittered around the feet of dinosaurs for 140 million years.
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  30. slapsticky
    • 2007 February 20, Dave Kehr, “New DVDs: The Cuban Masterworks Collection”, New York Times:
      Mr. Gutiérrez Alea, who died in 1996 after enjoying a comeback with “Strawberries and Chocolate” (1994) and “Guantanamera” (1995), may have been the richest talent in Cuban films, a “serious comedian” who was able to move beyond the slapsticky farce of “The Twelve Chairs” into the far greater introspection and melancholy of “Memories of Underdevelopment.”
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  31. sloganeering
    • 2007 February 20, Michiko Kakutani, “The Silence of the Rational Center”, New York Times:
      At such times, the nuanced and expert advice of what they call the rational center — career professionals, scholars, analysts and others working in government and at universities and think tanks — is sidelined or ignored, while emotional sloganeering is amplified by 24/7 cable news and Internet chatter that prize raucous confrontations between fervent avatars of the right and the left.
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  32. strandings
    • 2007 February 20, Jeff Bailey, “JetBlue Begins Reimbursing Stranded Passengers”, New York Times:
      Similar strandings occurred to an American Airlines plane in Austin, Tex., last December and to a Northwest Airlines plane in Detroit in January 1999.
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  33. substorm
    • 2007 February 20, Henry Fountain, “These Chili Peppers Are Hot and Old”, New York Times:
      The intent is to note when a phenomenon known as a substorm — a potentially damaging burst of energy — develops.
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  34. superwet
    • 2007 February 20, Natalie Angier, “A Mammal in Winter With a Furnace of Her Own”, New York Times:
      “You find mammals everywhere you look: on the ground, under the ground, near the highest mountaintops, in the sea and air, in arid deserts, superwet rainforests, on polar ice,” said Don E. Wilson, curator of mammals at the museum.
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  35. undigestable
    • 2007 February 20, Henry Fountain, “These Chili Peppers Are Hot and Old”, New York Times:
      My first thought was that that’s odd — things like that are usually caused by undigestable starches, and peppers don’t have starches.d.
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  36. unhittable
    • 2007 February 20, Ben Shpigel, “Mets Are Packing Roster for the Early Bird Specials”, New York Times:
      But no matter how often he replayed Adam Wainwright’s devastating curveball, his conclusion never changed: Never again, especially in that situation — two outs, bases loaded, bottom of the ninth — would he see a pitch that unhittable.
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Sequestered[edit]

  1. ecovoids: nonce
    • 2007 February 20, Natalie Angier, “A Mammal in Winter With a Furnace of Her Own”, New York Times:
      But when a giant asteroid barreled into Earth 65 million years ago, tossing up a fleecy quilt of dirt and ash that blocked the Sun, cooled the planet and killed off the dinosaurs along with about 70 percent of all living species, mammals and birds with their self-sufficient thermostats were able to weather the squalls, and the two groups quickly diversified to fill the ecovoids.
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  2. hognose -> hognose snake
    • 2007 February 20, Natalie Angier, “A Mammal in Winter With a Furnace of Her Own”, New York Times:
      No, not the construction workers, who were spooked by what turned out to be a collection of commonplace and quite harmless hognose and black rat snakes.
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  3. shmink