User:Visviva/NYT 20070225

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This is a list of lowercase non-hyphenated single words found in the 2007-02-25 issue of the New York Times which did not have English entries in the English Wiktionary when this list was created (2009-02-01).

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196165 tokens ‧ 145409 valid lowercase tokens ‧ 14099 types ‧ 129 (~ 0.915%) words before cleaning ‧ 

2007-02-25[edit]

  1. alim
    • 2007 February 25, Carla Power, “A Secret History”, New York Times:
      Akram is a working alim, lecturing in mosques and universities and dispensing fatwas on issues like inheritance and divorce.
      add
  2. ambulette
    • 2007 February 25, James Angelos, “By the Nip or the Pint, Less Sex, More City”, New York Times:
      As Mr. Sladek sat behind the counter and channel-surfed between the “Today” show and “The People’s Court” on a small television set, a tall man in sunglasses pulled up to the building in a dark blue ambulette.
      add
  3. androgynously
    • 2007 February 25, Maura Egan, “Imaginary Friends”, New York Times:
      (The young men who attend this convention dress androgynously or go slightly goth in black trench coats.
      add
  4. anticompetitive
    • 2007 February 25, Jonathan D. Glater, “Young Lawyers Sue, and Little Changes”, New York Times:
      The business of training people for the exam is dominated by BAR/BRI, which has been accused of anticompetitive behavior.
      add
  5. archduchesses
    • 2007 February 25, William Shaw, “We Are Not a Muse”, New York Times:
      If that weren’t enough, in 1993 she married Karl von Habsburg, otherwise known as Archduke Karl of Austria, Prince Royal of Hungary and Bohemia, and the couple set up home in Salzburg, producing two archduchesses and an archduke.
      add
  6. balmacaan
    • 2007 February 25, Lynn Yaeger, “Dead Stock”, New York Times:
      Which is why she can gallivant in a 1940s balmacaan and not feel that the previous owner is peering, Topper-like, over her shoulder.
      add
  7. banque
    • 2007 February 25, Horacio Silva, “Future Shock”, New York Times:
      Although he no longer maintains a design studio, Mugler is laughing all the way to the banque.
      add
  8. barebones
  9. bek
    • 2007 February 25, Michael Chabon, “‘Gentlemen of the Road’”, New York Times:
      If they were men of spirit they might resent the posting and wish they could be in on the hot battles and fat prizes in the distant Crimea, where Hanukkah said the new bek was busy suppressing rebellion.
      add
  10. bicoastal
    • 2007 February 25, Ingrid Sischy, “Body Politic”, New York Times:
      Now there are bicoastal extravaganzas planned for this spring: the Museum of Contemporary Art in Los Angeles will stage “WACK!
      add
  11. biennale
    • 2007 February 25, William Shaw, “We Are Not a Muse”, New York Times:
      In Venice for the 2005 biennale with the architect David Adjaye and the artist Olafur Eliasson. 6.
      add
  12. bishonen
    • 2007 February 25, Maura Egan, “Imaginary Friends”, New York Times:
      So today the female cosplayers swap their favorite yaoi comic books; take workshops on how to write their own anime series; attend the doll tea party; and in the evening bid on their favorite guys at the bishonen (pretty boy) auction, where males are sold for a night of fun.
      add
  13. blinged
    • 2007 February 25, Maura Egan, “Imaginary Friends”, New York Times:
      It was as if they had stepped into the bar scene in “Star Wars,” their wheelies navigating through a scrum of otherworldly creatures, including a fair-skinned beauty all done up like Morticia Addams, complete with a riding crop and cat ears; a pixie with a punk haircut blinged out in a silver spacesuit; and an Asian woman swaddled in pink Hello Kitty pajamas, a lollipop sticking out of her pert lips.
      add
  14. boatneck
    • 2007 February 25, S.S. Fair, “My Shopper/Myself”, New York Times:
      Think of it more as the Vogue version of “Celebrity Deathmatch”: the Samurai Shopper going boatneck to turtleneck with Evie Gorenstein, a former personal shopper at Bloomingdale’s and the ruler of the personal shopping roost at Loehmann’s until recently, when she hung out her own cyberspace shingle at shopwithevie@gmail.com .
      add
  15. bogeywoman
    • 2007 February 25, Kate Zernike, “Beware of Celebrities Bearing Gifts”, New York Times:
      Stephen Rivers, who has worked for politically active stars including Jane Fonda , recalled the 1988 Senate campaign in New Jersey, where the Republican, Pete Dawkins, was under fire for exaggerating his war record, and successfully changed the topic by invoking Ms. Fonda as the ultimate liberal antiwar bogeywoman. Mr. Dawkins’ campaign demanded that the Democrat, Frank Lautenberg , return $5,000 from a women’s group in Hollywood that the Republicans insisted was “controlled” by Ms. Fonda.
      add
  16. bohemia
    • 2007 February 25, Zarah Crawford, “Shock of the Few”, New York Times:
      Six feet tall, pale, thin, with a long, hawkish nose, Sitwell was a distinctly odd-looking bird, yet her medieval-style gowns — inspired by a fancied resemblance to Elizabeth I — cut from velvets and brocades, and accessorized with gold turbans and oversize Byzantine bling, made her an icon of between-the-wars bohemia.
      add
  17. boho
    • 2007 February 25, Zarah Crawford, “Shock of the Few”, New York Times:
      For months Mary-Kate Olsen suffered the pain of appearing on countless worst-dressed lists, yet there was more than a trace of her much-pilloried boho “bag lady” style in the slouchy layers that showed up most notably on Marc Jacobs ’s fall runway.
      add
  18. bowlegged
    • 2007 February 25, Michael S. Schmidt, “With Josh Howard”, New York Times:
      I was born bowlegged real bad, and there was a possibility I would never be able to walk.
      add
  19. catwalkers
    • 2007 February 25, Ingrid Sischy, “Body Politic”, New York Times:
      One can see that drama being played out in the fashion arena right now, with the debate over skinny models brought to a head by the deaths last fall of two South American catwalkers from complications of anorexia.
      add
  20. chapeaus
    • 2007 February 25, Zarah Crawford, “Shock of the Few”, New York Times:
      The Baroness’s knack for the unexpected accessory — a birthday cake, its candles aflame; a coal scuttle; a bird cage, all worn as hats — was wildly misunderstood in her lifetime, even though it foretold of Dalí’s 1930s collaborations with Schiaparelli, in which a lamb chop and an inkwell metamorphosed into cocktail chapeaus.
      add
  21. cheeseparing
    • 2007 February 25, Michael Chabon, “‘Gentlemen of the Road’”, New York Times:
      It so happened that Amram had been employed as a horse thief soon after he first set out from his village in pursuit of his stolen daughter, and it was a trade that he had continued to pursue intermittently ever since, in particular during his 10 years of service in the armies of Constantinople, when he had been obliged, through the improvidence and cheeseparing of the emperor’s quartermasters and longstanding custom of his border troops, to steal not only horses but also cattle, sheep, goats, fowl, grain, cheeses, fuel, skins, wool and hides.
      add
  22. clapboards
    • 2007 February 25, Sven Birkerts, “From the Farm”, New York Times:
      Down here, snow and wind: / cold blew through the clapboards, / our spring was frozen in the frozen ground.” e.
      add
  23. coloradito
    • 2007 February 25, “Expanding the Scene”, New York Times:
      Two varieties are offered, negro and coloradito, each served with a choice of pork or chicken and rice and beans.
      add
  24. combats
    • 2007 February 25, Sandra Ballentine, “Tales From the Powder Room”, New York Times:
      Westman combats jet lag with açaí, a Brazilian berry that’s high in antioxidants.
      add
  25. costumey
    • 2007 February 25, Zarah Crawford, “A Return Engagement: I Dream of Genies”, New York Times:
      More pragmatic members of the press greeted the revival with less than Turkish delight, deeming them too costumey for ordinary women.
      add
  26. counterspree
    • 2007 February 25, Daphne Merkin, “Take Back the Nightie”, New York Times:
      One wonders whether this spree and counterspree testified to a failure of nerve or an attack of guilt or, perhaps, an argument with her husband over the wisdom of spending so heedlessly when he was facing a possible 40-year jail term.
      add
  27. cravable
    • 2007 February 25, “Expanding the Scene”, New York Times:
      The meat pies — those distinctly Australian savory pastries stuffed with a fatty mix of minced beef and onions, moistened with stock — are definitely cravable.
      add
  28. czarlike
    • 2007 February 25, Steven Lee Myers, “Post-Putin”, New York Times:
      His genuine popularity, nourished by the czarlike aura cultivated around him, has smothered any chance for an alternative national leader to emerge, even one of his own choosing.
      add
  29. dem
  30. dhol
  31. documentarists
  32. doublewide
    • 2007 February 25, Kristina Shevory, “A New Orleans Neighborhood Rebuilds”, New York Times:
      Working out of a doublewide trailer at a local church, residents surveyed Broadmoor and designed a database on the area’s 7,000 residents and selected block captains to monitor the area.
      add
  33. floriculture
    • 2007 February 25, Constance Casey, “Petal Pushers”, New York Times:
      Although floriculture is a highly competitive, $40 billion global business, Stewart doesn’t expose much corruption.
      add
  34. flourlike
    • 2007 February 25, Dan Barber, “The Great Carrot Caper”, New York Times:
      Jean-Marc, a scrupulous recycler, collected the flourlike dust after pressing almonds for the oil and spread it over his potato field like compost.
      add
  35. fundable
    • 2007 February 25, Michael Fitzgerald, “When Germs Talk, Maybe Humans Can Answer”, New York Times:
      After all, just 10 years ago the mere idea was not yet widely accepted in scientific circles, let alone fundable as a possible source of an antibiotic.
      add
  36. gallerist
    • 2007 February 25, William Shaw, “We Are Not a Muse”, New York Times:
      (Recently she told the London gallerist Jay Jopling that he should expand his horizons from British art stars like Damien Hirst and the Chapman brothers and take a more global view.
      add
  37. gangliness
    • 2007 February 25, Alan Riding, “Melly Still”, New York Times:
      They could imitate the gangliness of teenage boys and double up in other roles.
      add
  38. hennaed
    • 2007 February 25, Zarah Crawford, “Shock of the Few”, New York Times:
      Her green eyes — dilated by drops of toxic belladonna — were ringed with kohl, a startling contrast to her Medusa-like tangle of wild hennaed hair.
      add
  39. hesitancies
    • 2007 February 25, John Lewis Gaddis, “Great Leap Forward”, New York Times:
      Drawing on recently released Chinese sources, she shows that it was Mao himself who steered the course toward rapprochement with Washington, overruling the hesitancies and objections of his subordinates.
      add
  40. hikikomori
    • 2007 February 25, Jason Zinoman, “This Just In, via London, Los Angeles, Pittsburgh”, New York Times:
      The English-language premiere of Yoji Sakate’s play, with an American cast, examines a bizarre phenomenon called hikikomori, in which young people withdraw into their rooms and refuse any contact with the world for months or years.
      add
  41. homiest
    • 2007 February 25, “Expanding the Scene”, New York Times:
      With its wraparound windows and neon sign, Cafe Steinhof is just about New York’s homiest Austrian outpost.
      add
  42. honeyish
    • 2007 February 25, Chandler Burr, “Ghost Flowers”, New York Times:
      Maybe a little honeyish smell, a little vanillic, depending on the hybrid,” says Alberto Morillas, the perfumer who created the scent for Bulgari. l.
      add
  43. housedress
    • 2007 February 25, Lynn Yaeger, “Dead Stock”, New York Times:
      As for unlucky garments, Dubin admits that when she showed up in divorce court recently, dressed in a denim Oscar de la Renta ensemble from the 1980s, she hoped it was a good sign that the judge herself was wearing a ’40s housedress.
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  44. hummable
    • 2007 February 25, Jason Zinoman, “This Just In, via London, Los Angeles, Pittsburgh”, New York Times:
      MAKE ME A SONG: THE MUSIC OF WILLIAM FINN A major treat for musical theater fans: a revue featuring the always clever and sweetly sentimental songs of Mr. Finn (“Falsettoland”), the composer responsible for some of the most hummable tunes heard in the theater over the last few decades.
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  45. hydroxycitronellal
    • 2007 February 25, Chandler Burr, “Ghost Flowers”, New York Times:
      The 1956 Diorissimo is the paradigmatic “lily of the valley perfume,” its lily of the valley made of molecules like hydroxycitronellal, geraniol and phenyl ethyl alcohol.
      add
  46. insidery
  47. jargony
    • 2007 February 25, Amy Finnerty, “The Way From San Jose”, New York Times:
      With her jargony commentary on society, Millner often seems to be building defenses against getting too personal, being too clear.
      add
  48. javert
    • 2007 February 25, William Safire, “Doughnut Hole”, New York Times:
      This bit of history was provided to On Language by Fred Shapiro, bulldog editor of the Yale Book of Quotations, who set a javert of search engines whirring in responding to my query for the first printed use of doughnut hole .
      add
  49. jinxing
  50. jumpoff
  51. jumpstarts
    • 2007 February 25, Eric Dash, “Citigroup Expected to Name a New Financial Chief”, New York Times:
      If it jumpstarts progress, Mr. Prince may be able to reverse the company’s severe underperformance and turn the barrage of public criticism against him into a wave of support.
      add
  52. kneeslapping
    • 2007 February 25, Jennifer Bleyer, “Looking for Luck in Winter’s Chill”, New York Times:
      They dissolve into a roaring wave of twitching, jumping, nail-biting, teeth-clenching, kneeslapping and screaming.
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  53. landmarked
    • 2007 February 25, Leonard Benardo And Jennifer Weiss, “Street Cred”, New York Times:
      But perhaps it would be better if street names were treated like landmarked buildings so that we can have a vision not just of who we are today but who we once were.
      add
  54. linalyl
    • 2007 February 25, Chandler Burr, “Ghost Flowers”, New York Times:
      To create it, he used a natural violet leaf, essence of acacia flower, linalyl acetate, geraniol and citronellol (molecules found in jasmine and rose).
      add
  55. matronhood
    • 2007 February 25, Zarah Crawford, “Shock of the Few”, New York Times:
      Even today, it’s a signifier of asexual matronhood.
      add
  56. mishandlings
    • 2007 February 25, Jon Benjamin, “Speedy Motorcycle”, New York Times:
      I often involve my sister in my financial mishandlings, so I decided to have it shipped to her house outside of New Haven.
      add
  57. moonlike
    • 2007 February 25, Alice Rawsthorn, “Ulterior Motifs”, New York Times:
      Think of the moonlike images that Lindy Roy designed for the entrance to the Gallery Met at the Metropolitan Opera House, or the colorful facades of David Adjaye’s buildings.
      add
  58. morani
    • 2007 February 25, Janine Di Giovanni, “Two in the Bush”, New York Times:
      The warriors, or morani, are frequently bare-chested and wear red shukas that look like togas.
      add
  59. mousquetaire
    • 2007 February 25, Horacio Silva, “Joie de Vivier”, New York Times:
      Expecting to find only 30 shoe styles, Frisoni and de la Fressange were surprised to stumble across 177 pairs, including red python boots made for Diana Vreeland and thigh-high black mousquetaire boots bequeathed by Pauline de Rothschild.
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  60. mpeg
    • 2007 February 25, Jason Pontin, “Millions of Videos, and Now a Way to Search Inside Them”, New York Times:
      That’s because they don’t search the videos themselves, but rather things associated with them, including the text of a Web page, the “metadata” that computers use to display or understand pages (like keywords or the semantic tags that describe different content), video-file suffixes (like .mpeg or .avi), or captions or subtitles.
      add
  61. muhaddithat
    • 2007 February 25, Carla Power, “A Secret History”, New York Times:
      The dictionary’s diverse entries include a 10th-century Baghdad-born jurist who traveled through Syria and Egypt, teaching other women; a female scholar — or muhaddithat — in 12th-century Egypt whose male students marveled at her mastery of a “camel load” of texts; and a 15th-century woman who taught hadith at the Prophet’s grave in Medina, one of the most important spots in Islam.
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  62. muzungu
    • 2007 February 25, Janine Di Giovanni, “Two in the Bush”, New York Times:
      Anna is a muzungu, a white person, but she is African to her bones.
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  63. neroli
    • 2007 February 25, Chandler Burr, “Ghost Flowers”, New York Times:
      You’ll find real jasmine extract in Abercrombie & Fitch perfume; real broom in Boucheron; neroli in Guerlain’s Eau Impériale; and natural tuberose in Amouage Gold and Dior’s Poison.
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  64. noncash
    • 2007 February 25, Mark A. Stein, “Sharing the Pain in Different Ways”, New York Times:
      Coca-Cola Enterprises took a $2.9 billion noncash charge in the fourth quarter to account for the diminished book value of its North American franchises.
      add
  65. nongaming
    • 2007 February 25, The Associated Press, “Victories Help Shine a Spotlight on Bosh”, New York Times:
      And Las Vegas officials estimated that 85,000 people visited the city, generating an estimated $90.6 million in nongaming economic impact.
      add
  66. nonsluggers
    • 2007 February 25, Alan Schwarz, “New Baseball Statistic, With a Nod to an Old Standard”, New York Times:
      But they truly represented the sport’s most well-rounded batters, having weeded out walk-averse nonsluggers like the Pirates ’ Freddy Sanchez, who had a .288 G.P.A. despite winning the National League batting title at .344.
      add
  67. nutfulness
    • 2007 February 25, Dan Barber, “The Great Carrot Caper”, New York Times:
      And nothing that suggested nutfulness in the future.
      add
  68. omiai
    • 2007 February 25, Christine Muhlke, “Tokyo Pose”, New York Times:
      Sawada, a 29-year-old photographer based in Kobe, Japan, is a deft identity thief, whether dressed in one of 400 get-ups in a photo booth, starring as every schoolgirl (and teacher) in a series of class portraits or posing as a range of kimono-wrapped women for mock omiai pictures traditional pictures sent to potential suitors.
      add
  69. overplowing
    • 2007 February 25, Anthony Tommasini, “Music to Heal a Land of Dust and Floods”, New York Times:
      Though he had never directed a film, he had collected raw material for one, including photographs of dust storms — caused, in part, by the overplowing of the Plains — bread lines and migrant workers.
      add
  70. paradisiac
    • 2007 February 25, Carol Kino, “So They All Get Naked and Play, Like Mom Did”, New York Times:
      In her current show, at Mitchell-Innes & Nash in Chelsea, the landscape is populated by tribes of naked mature women — many of them pregnant or nursing, suggesting wandering fertility goddesses — who are playing with their children in paradisiac settings of forest, meadow and sea.
      add
  71. patinated
    • 2007 February 25, Jessica Joffe, “Hidden Treasures”, New York Times:
      But a young sculptor is lending patinated sparkle to this sleepy shopping strip with the rarefied antiques and jewelry store Erie Basin.
      add
  72. peplums
    • 2007 February 25, Zarah Crawford, “The Girl Who Fell to Earth”, New York Times:
      The ingenious use of embedded silicon chips allowed Chalayan’s clothing to actually transform on the models’ bodies, as silhouettes folded in on themselves; peplums opened like insects’ wings; and bodices sprouted twinkling mirrors — all with the slow grace of time-lapse photography.
      add
  73. postindependence
    • 2007 February 25, Hari Kunzru, “Unparallel Lives”, New York Times:
      From Chinua Achebe’s stories of corruption and social collapse to Ken Saro-Wiwa’s Nigerian child soldier Sozaboy, a vein of pervasive hopelessness runs through the writing of a region that has witnessed the slide of postindependence dreams into civil war and chaos.
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  74. postsermon
    • 2007 February 25, Gretel C. Kovach, “Ashley Cargill and Gregory Buechele”, New York Times:
      At postsermon Sunday dinners, Mr. Buechele maneuvered to sit next to her every single night.
      add
  75. powersuited
    • 2007 February 25, Horacio Silva, “Future Shock”, New York Times:
      Emma Sjoberg in hard-core biker chic in ’92; a powersuited Iman in ’91.
      add
  76. preconsumerist
    • 2007 February 25, Daphne Merkin, “Take Back the Nightie”, New York Times:
      Somewhere along the way, what begins as no more than a habit of hedging one’s bets, of walking around each and every new acquisition as though it might be the last or the ne plus ultra of its kind, becomes, without your quite realizing it, a compulsion: a need to undo what is done; unmake the sale; wipe the slate clean; begin again, naked of adornment in a preconsumerist Garden where there is nothing to be tempted by but Adam.
      add
  77. preretirement
    • 2007 February 25, Louis Uchitelle, “Job Security, Too, May Have a Happy Medium”, New York Times:
      And, of course, everywhere in Europe, the state pays for health insurance and for pensions that often encourage early retirement by replacing big percentages of preretirement income.
      add
  78. provocateurs
    • 2007 February 25, Zarah Crawford, “Shock of the Few”, New York Times:
      Many of these aesthetic provocateurs made their lives on the edge of a male-dominated art world, where often the only role open to them was that of artist’s muse or mistress.
      add
  79. reinfiltrates
    • 2007 February 25, Liesl Schillinger, “Play It Again”, New York Times:
      As this narrator reinfiltrates everyday life, he fakes normalcy, trying “to make my movements come across as more authentic.”
      add
  80. retailored
    • 2007 February 25, Paul L. Underwood, “Tag Lady”, New York Times:
      But like Jay-Z , she has plenty to keep her busy, from her massive vintage clothing collection to a fashion director’s job at Swindle magazine and a namesake clothing line, with T-shirts, retailored bomber jackets and scarves that bear her signature logo.
      add
  81. revisioning
    • 2007 February 25, “Hart Crane”, New York Times:
      This critic certainly gets Hart Crane’s drunkenness down, but the hours, days, even weeks that Crane stayed at a poem, alone, revisioning and revising, trying to get down something large and true — of that travail this critic has nothing to say.
      add
  82. rivalrous
  83. sautoir
    • 2007 February 25, Dan Barber, “The Great Carrot Caper”, New York Times:
      Figuring that Jean-Marc was making an almond tart for dessert, he opened the door to the kitchen and saw only a large sautoir of potatoes simmering gently in duck fat.
      add
  84. scamperings
  85. scorebooks
    • 2007 February 25, Vincent M. Mallozzi, “The Final Buzzer for a College Fixture”, New York Times:
      He watched most games through large eyeglasses that drooped from the bridge of his nose, which spent half a lifetime buried in stat sheets and scorebooks.
      add
  86. semimythic
    • 2007 February 25, Hari Kunzru, “Unparallel Lives”, New York Times:
      He turns into a semimythic figure for his brother, representing the possibilities of the road not taken, the path of action instead of contemplation.
      add
  87. sextravaganza
    • 2007 February 25, Horacio Silva, “Future Shock”, New York Times:
      Also in the works is a touring fashion sextravaganza to rival his spectacles of the ’90s, and two burlesque revues — for the Crazy Horse club in Paris and its sister venue at the MGM Grand in Las Vegas.
      add
  88. sheerly
    • 2007 February 25, S.S. Fair, “My Shopper/Myself”, New York Times:
      A Samurai Shopper never shops out of desperation but hunts sheerly for the sport, or to hone her sense of aesthetics.
      add
  89. shukas
    • 2007 February 25, Janine Di Giovanni, “Two in the Bush”, New York Times:
      The warriors, or morani, are frequently bare-chested and wear red shukas that look like togas.
      add
  90. sniffable
    • 2007 February 25, Chandler Burr, “Descendants”, New York Times:
      (0) Do not inhale; (*) Offensive; (**) Eminently sniffable; (***) Breathtaking; (****) Total nose job; (*****) Transcendent
      add
  91. spartans
    • 2007 February 25, Alice Rawsthorn, “Ulterior Motifs”, New York Times:
      The same technology makes the new patterns much more appealing to stylistic spartans like me.
      add
  92. superspeedway
    • 2007 February 25, “Letters to the Editor”, New York Times:
      Let’s run a real 500-mile race on a superspeedway, with no limits on engines, tires, oil, fuel, or vehicle weight or shape.
      add
  93. supervoting
    • 2007 February 25, Ben Stein, “Of Tax Cuts and Those $10 Million Bat Mitzvahs”, New York Times:
      His family owns the supervoting shares that control the Four Seasons, and Mr. Sharp says he wants to simplify succession issues with his children.
      add
  94. svelteness
  95. swelteringly
    • 2007 February 25, Daphne Merkin, “Take Back the Nightie”, New York Times:
      I had enjoyed a particularly busy fall buying and returning a number of cunningly conceived but swelteringly heavy clothes and an equal number of transcendently beautiful scarves I had fallen in love with at Takashimaya, a store that manages to turn consuming into a culturally uplifting experience.
      add
  96. tafelspitz
  97. telerobotic
    • 2007 February 25, Horacio Silva, “Future Shock”, New York Times:
      Expect plenty of telerobotic pasties in fashion’s future.
      add
  98. traylike
    • 2007 February 25, Phil Patton, “Parking as a Destination”, New York Times:
      The car rests on a large pallet, a traylike area with shallow troughs for the wheels.
      add
  99. underperformance
    • 2007 February 25, Louis Uchitelle, “Job Security, Too, May Have a Happy Medium”, New York Times:
      Many American economists, bent on demonstrating the payoff from layoffs, paid relatively little attention to the cyclical reasons for the underperformance of Japan and Europe.
      add
  100. understatedness
    • 2007 February 25, C. J. Hughes, “Discovering Divine Sites for Condos”, New York Times:
      Although its facade is generously decorated with Beaux-Arts garlands and shields, he explained, its understatedness made it easier to convert and to sell.
      add
  101. unlive
    • 2007 February 25, Stacey D’Erasmo, “Suddenly One Summer”, New York Times:
      They “can never undo it, never unwrite it, never unlive it, or relive it.
      add
  102. unstaged
    • 2007 February 25, Bernard Holland, “O Master of the Grand Plan, Isn’t ‘Fidelio,’ Well, Puzzling?”, New York Times:
      Smart people have long admired Christine Brewer for her power, clarity and good musical sense; and since her outstanding singing at unstaged performances of Wagner’s “Tristan und Isolde” at the Los Angeles Philharmonic a few years ago, more around the world know of her.
      add
  103. vanillic
    • 2007 February 25, Chandler Burr, “Ghost Flowers”, New York Times:
      Maybe a little honeyish smell, a little vanillic, depending on the hybrid,” says Alberto Morillas, the perfumer who created the scent for Bulgari. l.
      add
  104. washings
    • 2007 February 25, Kelley Holland, “When Religious Needs Test Company Policy”, New York Times:
      Ford, for example, supports the Ford Interfaith Network, which among other things has lobbied for physical accommodations for employees’ religious practices, like sinks designed for the religious washings that Muslim employees may perform.
      add
  105. weiquan
    • 2007 February 25, Joseph Kahn, “Rivals on Legal Tightrope Seek to Expand Freedoms in China”, New York Times:
      Young, well educated and idealistic, they and other members of the so-called weiquan, or rights defense, movement, aim to use the laws and courts that the Communist Party has put in place as part of its modernization drive to constrain the party’s power.
      add
  106. zweigelt
    • 2007 February 25, Howard G. Goldberg, “A Spicy Keeper From Austria”, New York Times:
      Höpler’s zweigelt costs $19 at Winesby.com , 23 Jones Street (Bleecker Street).
      add

Sequestered[edit]

  1. busgoers: not attestable
    • 2007 February 25, David Carr, “Red Carpet Confidential”, New York Times:
      I could have told my fellow busgoers that the hand that held the bus ticket also beheld the light touch of the movie star, but whatever sparkle had been bestowed had evaporated.
      add
  2. caplan: proper noun (Caplan House)
    • 2007 February 25, Pilar Viladas, “Cool and Collected”, New York Times:
      The caplan house’s central gallery, with a stack of aluminum boxes by Donald Judd, a painting by Andy Warhol and sculptures by Martin Puryear (on the wall) and Alan Saret (on the floor).
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  3. lookie -> lookie here