User:Visviva/NYT 20070301

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This is a list of lowercase non-hyphenated single words found in the 2007-03-01 issue of the New York Times which did not have English entries in the English Wiktionary when this list was created (2009-02-01).

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100491 tokens ‧ 74788 valid lowercase tokens ‧ 9130 types ‧ 61 (~ 0.668%) words before cleaning ‧ 

2007-03-01[edit]

  1. alkalines
    • 2007 March 1, David Pogue, “With Cameras, Compromising Can Pay Off”, New York Times:
      You use AA rechargeables most of the time — and yet, if they die while you’re on the road, you can always pop into a drugstore, pick up some new AAs (lithiums or even a gross of AA alkalines), and keep right on shooting.
      add
  2. anticompetitive
    • 2007 March 1, Stephen Labaton, “Sirius Chief Talks of Ways to Get XM Deal Approved”, New York Times:
      But as he tried to sell the proposed deal to Washington, he also acknowledged the major challenges he faced in persuading policy makers that it would not be anticompetitive.
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  3. aristo
    • 2007 March 1, Horacio Silva, “Stag Party at the Hunting Lodge”, New York Times:
      The all-natural hand-stitched rubber wellies by the French company Le Chameau are, at $390, a tad expensive for my liking, even if they are lined with pigskin and are the preferred weekend mud boots for the European aristo horsey set.
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  4. boychild
    • 2007 March 1, Janet Maslin, “Dubliners Gone Noir in Those Shame-Based 1950s”, New York Times:
      (Mal is Dublin’s most sought-after obstetrician, causing Quirke to muse that “many a boychild born here at the Holy Family Hospital was obliged to venture out upon the obstacle course of life bearing what Quirke was sure would be the not inconsiderable handicap of being named Malachy.”)
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  5. braider
    • 2007 March 1, Joyce Wadler, “Writing Her Own Sequel”, New York Times:
      He was determined to be the best rawhide braider in the world; when she struggled with a piece of writing, he understood.
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  6. congressionally
    • 2007 March 1, Linda Greenhouse, “Court Hears Arguments Linking Right to Sue and Spending on Religion”, New York Times:
      In a complaint filed initially in 2004, the organization argued that officials who convened and addressed the conferences used congressionally appropriated money in a way that “violated the fundamental principle of the separation of church and state.”
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  7. cotrimoxazole
    • 2007 March 1, Lawrence K. Altman, “Project Curbs Malaria in Ugandan Group”, New York Times:
      Because pediatricians are concerned that prolonged use of cotrimoxazole could lead to resistant malaria, they often stop the drug among AIDS patients when tests show significant improvement in the health of their immune system after antiretroviral therapy.
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  8. cullings
    • 2007 March 1, Michael Wines, “South Africa Considers Culling Elephants as Last Resort”, New York Times:
      While he did not rule out further killings, Mr. van Schalkwyk, who is also minister of tourism, made it clear on Wednesday that the cullings would be both limited and approved only after other options had been exhausted.
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  9. cumbersomely
    • 2007 March 1, Guy Trebay, “Folk Wear for the World”, New York Times:
      And the point could have been made less cumbersomely had each model come out with her iPod ear buds plugged in and illuminated in the eerie blue glow of a P.D.A. or a cellphone.
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  10. downlighting
    • 2007 March 1, Matthew L. Wald, “Room to Improve”, New York Times:
      They are also sold in “high-hat,” or downlighting, fixtures for the ceiling.
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  11. eyelift
  12. governability
  13. hairstyling
    • 2007 March 1, Horacio Silva, “Stag Party at the Hunting Lodge”, New York Times:
      Unlike the staff at a lot of places that offer similar services, the three barbers all have a background in hairstyling and clearly understand their downtown crowd.
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  14. hitless
    • 2007 March 1, The Associated Press, “Jenks Comes Out of Game With Tightness in Shoulder”, New York Times:
      GOOD START FOR WAINWRIGHT Adam Wainwright, who is bidding for a place in the St. Louis rotation, pitched three hitless innings yesterday to help the Cardinals beat the Florida Marlins , 6-3, in the exhibition opener for both teams.
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  15. idlings
    • 2007 March 1, Reuters, “Ford’s Overhaul to Cost $11.18 Billion”, New York Times:
      The automaker said it expected to spend $5.96 billion on a jobs bank and other “personnel reduction programs,” $2.74 billion on charges related to scaling back pensions, $2.2 billion from fixed-asset impairment charges and $281 million associated with plant idlings.
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  16. ikat
    • 2007 March 1, Guy Trebay, “Folk Wear for the World”, New York Times:
      You could note it again at a Balenciaga show that invoked so many of what used to be called ethnic influences — kimono, ikat prints, folk embroideries from Eastern Europe, Moroccan coin ornaments, Peruvian peasant blankets and Tyrolean boiled wool — that it seemed like a luxury goods tour bus had crashed into an outlet of Crafts Caravan.
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  17. incandescents
    • 2007 March 1, Matthew L. Wald, “Room to Improve”, New York Times:
      Compact fluorescents are typically rated at 7,500 to 10,000 hours, and incandescents at about 1,500 hours.
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  18. intrasquad
    • 2007 March 1, Ben Shpigel, “Not October, but Mets Play Tigers”, New York Times:
      José Valentín twisted his right ankle rounding first base in Monday’s intrasquad game and was held out of the lineup Wednesday.
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  19. knowingness
    • 2007 March 1, Ben Ratliff, “Dressing Up the Domestic With Something Less Routine”, New York Times:
      Likewise, the music carries precise touches of archaic or low-rent sound to transmit knowingness: a fuzz guitar sample, a mentholated electric-piano tone or the plastic toy instrument from the ’80s, the Omnichord.
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  20. lithiums
    • 2007 March 1, David Pogue, “With Cameras, Compromising Can Pay Off”, New York Times:
      You use AA rechargeables most of the time — and yet, if they die while you’re on the road, you can always pop into a drugstore, pick up some new AAs (lithiums or even a gross of AA alkalines), and keep right on shooting.
      add
  21. malarious
    • 2007 March 1, Lawrence K. Altman, “Project Curbs Malaria in Ugandan Group”, New York Times:
      Dr. Abrams, the Columbia expert, said in an interview that the Uganda findings had additional implications for treating H.I.V.-infected children in malarious areas.
      add
  22. multihued
    • 2007 March 1, Jeff Leeds, “A Comeback in 3-D, but Without Those Flimsy Glasses”, New York Times:
      Many music fans may be too young to recall the last time 3-D was in vogue: the 1980s, when hordes donned flimsy multihued glasses to watch “Jaws 3” and other attractions.
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  23. nastinesses
  24. nondesigner
    • 2007 March 1, Horacio Silva, “Stag Party at the Hunting Lodge”, New York Times:
      In fairness, they are handmade by the redoubtable Brooklyn tailor Martin Greenfield, who has measured the inside seam of presidents from Eisenhower to Clinton, but I balk at paying designer prices for nondesigner clothing.
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  25. noninvestment
    • 2007 March 1, Jenny Anderson, “Soothing Words and a Stock Market Rebound”, New York Times:
      By some estimates, the potential risks to the big banks are relatively modest. Mr. Hintz, of Sanford Bernstein, calculates that Lehman Brothers had $7.3 billion in residual risks at the end of 2006, $2 billion of it in noninvestment grade mortgages.
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  26. nonmedicinal
    • 2007 March 1, “Pain Relief, Step by Step”, New York Times:
      The most striking recommendation is that pain treatments should start with nonmedicinal approaches, like physical therapy and exercise, weight loss to reduce stress on joints, and hot or cold packs.
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  27. nonoperatic
    • 2007 March 1, “A Grand Time for Opera”, New York Times:
      Mr. Gelb has already shown that he is committed to expanding the reach of the Metropolitan Opera by bringing nonoperatic directors to its stage and by broadcasting opera to audiences in Times Square and Lincoln Center Plaza. Mr. Mortier has a reputation for being brash, and he is likely to take the City Opera in directions that are eye-popping in production and contemporary in repertoire.
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  28. paraphrasable
  29. poufs
    • 2007 March 1, Eric Wilson, “Gaultier’s Highland Prairie Fling”, New York Times:
      Valentino showed his tweed suits with shoulder poufs of spotted fox, red taffeta gowns cinched at the knees with big showy bows, and a coat and skirt ensemble with a sweater, tights and shoes all in the same shade of brown.
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  30. preannouncing
    • 2007 March 1, Adam Nagourney, “In Newly Usual Way, McCain Says He’ll Run”, New York Times:
      For 2008, on the other hand, candidates have been not only announcing but also preannouncing on Web sites and various television shows and in random interviews.
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  31. presentencing
  32. preunion
  33. racewalker
    • 2007 March 1, Sarah Bowen Shea, “Rapid Weight Gain (but Don’t Worry)”, New York Times:
      Mark Fenton, a former racewalker and the author of “The Complete Guide to Walking for Health, Weight Loss and Fitness,” wore vests during 2 to 3 mile walks on varied terrain and doing calisthenics.
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  34. rechargeables
    • 2007 March 1, David Pogue, “With Cameras, Compromising Can Pay Off”, New York Times:
      You use AA rechargeables most of the time — and yet, if they die while you’re on the road, you can always pop into a drugstore, pick up some new AAs (lithiums or even a gross of AA alkalines), and keep right on shooting.
      add
  35. reimpress
  36. ruralized
    • 2007 March 1, Michael Slackman, “In Arab Hub, the Poor Are Left to Their Fate”, New York Times:
      But it is also a collection of villages, a ruralized metropolis where people live by their wits and devices, cut off from the authorities, the law and often each other.
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  37. shackets
    • 2007 March 1, Horacio Silva, “Stag Party at the Hunting Lodge”, New York Times:
      The disappointingly drab T-shirts ($54) were as appealing to me as leftover venison, but it’s hard to fault the in-house line of ruggedly unobtrusive work shirts ($178) or the assortment of unlined shirt jackets ($298) — shackets?
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  38. situps
    • 2007 March 1, Shivani Vora, “A Boot Camp for Men With a Shy Side”, New York Times:
      “The idea of girls watching me as I struggle through my situps made me a little nervous,” said Mr. Goodrich, a sales representative in Beverly Hills, Mich.
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  39. slimline
    • 2007 March 1, Horacio Silva, “Stag Party at the Hunting Lodge”, New York Times:
      Made from dead-stock vintage fabric, they are available in three styles: standard, slimline and three-button.
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  40. snakeskin
    • 2007 March 1, Eric Wilson, “Gaultier’s Highland Prairie Fling”, New York Times:
      Left: A furry wrap over an asymmetrically draped shirt, loose trousers and fisherman boots from Ann Demeulemeester; A slinky jersey dress painted with a silver spiral by Karl Lagerfeld and a snakeskin motorcycle jacket over a mohair skirt a la Burberry.
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  41. spacesick
    • 2007 March 1, Dennis Overbye, “Stephen Hawking Plans Prelude to the Ride of His Life”, New York Times:
      Zero Gravity, founded in 1993 by Dr. Diamandis and Byron K. Lichtenberg, a former astronaut, has flown some 2,500 people, only 1 or 2 percent of whom, Dr. Diamandis said, have become spacesick.
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  42. splatterings
    • 2007 March 1, Colin Moynihan, “Defacer With Mystery Agenda Is Attacking Street Art”, New York Times:
      Nobody has yet reported the splatterings to the police, perhaps because city laws say that the art that was defaced is just as unlawful as the paint splashed onto it.
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  43. sportif
    • 2007 March 1, Horacio Silva, “Stag Party at the Hunting Lodge”, New York Times:
      Mr. Somer and Mr. Tigertt, who are also responsible for Freemans, the haute comfort-food restaurant at the end of the alley from the store, have stuffed the premises with enough taxidermy, sportif accouterments and other retro-butch guy bait to lure even the most reluctant shopper.
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  44. squallish
    • 2007 March 1, Michael Kimmelman, “Lights! Darks! Action! Cut! Maestro of Mise-en-Scène”, New York Times:
      He was pushy, impatient, squallish and, when he wasn’t careless or wildly overextended, not a little too talented for Titian, who instead promoted the more easily loved Veronese.
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  45. tentlike
    • 2007 March 1, Ruth La Ferla, “Jackets, in a Loose Sense”, New York Times:
      WAS it just a year ago that retailers despaired of selling a tentlike silhouette as buoyant on top as it is below?
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  46. twinless
    • 2007 March 1, Neela Banerjee, “A Singular Pain: When Death Cuts the Bond of Twins”, New York Times:
      What struck me is that although it takes awhile for any group to trust one another, when twinless twins get together in a group, they seem to sense and trust each other immediately, enabling them to move forward in the healing process.”t.
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  47. unsatiated
  48. unscreened
    • 2007 March 1, Jane Gross, “New Options (and Risks) in Home Care for Elderly”, New York Times:
      They are usually untrained, unscreened and unsupervised, but more affordable without an agency’s fee, less constrained by regulations and hired through personal recommendation.
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Sequestered[edit]