User:Visviva/NYT 20070302

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This is a list of lowercase non-hyphenated single words found in the 2007-03-02 issue of the New York Times which did not have English entries in the English Wiktionary when this list was created (2009-02-02).

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111125 tokens ‧ 78533 valid lowercase tokens ‧ 9512 types ‧ 49 (~ 0.515%) words before cleaning ‧ 

2007-03-02[edit]

  1. adaptives
    • 2007 March 2, Roberta Smith, “Visions That Flaunt Cartoon Pedigrees”, New York Times:
      In the case of Franz West and Polly Apfelbaum you have works that are charmingly whimsical but irrelevant to the show’s focus. Mr. West’s four small plaster and iron sculptures, called adaptives, are available for handling.
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  2. anthropomorphosis
    • 2007 March 2, The New York Times, “Museum and Gallery Listings”, New York Times:
      He’s best known for his views of aristocratic race horses, seen purely as beautiful animals with no attempt at anthropomorphosis, but he painted other mammals too, dogs, lions, tigers, oxen, monkeys and humans.
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  3. aspirationals
    • 2007 March 2, Michael Barbaro, “It’s Not Only About Price at Wal-Mart”, New York Times:
      From now on, all product decisions will be organized around the three groups — brand aspirationals, price-sensitive affluents and value-price shoppers — that, Wal-Mart says, represent the majority of its business.
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  4. biwa
    • 2007 March 2, The New York Times, “Classical Music/Opera Listings”, New York Times:
      The biwa is a kind of lute (not unlike the Chinese pipa), which the player-singer Junko Tahara has formed into a distinctive ensemble that will perform everything from a brand-new work by Masataka Matsuo to a medieval epic called “The Tale of the Heike” on Sunday afternoon.
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  5. caballero
    • 2007 March 2, The New York Times, “Museum and Gallery Listings”, New York Times:
      He had his own way with materials and color and an unforgettable cast of characters (most notably, a mounted caballero and a levitating Madonna crowned like the Statue of Liberty.)
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  6. cabinetlike
    • 2007 March 2, The New York Times, “Museum and Gallery Listings”, New York Times:
      His art and his story are like few others, and so is the museum’s inspired installation: a single, long corridor with cabinetlike rooms of paintings on either side and, at the very end, against a sea-green wall, a life-size doll with giant bat wings floating overhead.
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  7. calaloo
    • 2007 March 2, The New York Times, “Spare Times”, New York Times:
      But this party will depart from tradition, with calaloo, fish stew and ginger beer, as well as the marching band the Rude Mechanical Orchestra, playing klezmer and calypso music; members of Romashka, a “nu-Gypsy” group; and D.J. Rekha, the founder of the Basement Bhangra parties.
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  8. categorizers
  9. chajangmyon
  10. counterattacked
    • 2007 March 2, Alissa J. Rubin, “7 at a Baghdad Wedding Are Killed by a Car Bomb”, New York Times:
      Two groups that have had ties to insurgents, the Islamic Party Fighters and forces of the 20th Revolution brigade, counterattacked in support of the local residents, apparently having turned against those insurgents because of their links to Al Qaeda.
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  11. dacryphilia
    • 2007 March 2, Lisa W. Foderaro, “Genteel Enclave Puzzles Over Reports of a Dominatrix”, New York Times:
      She provided a laundry list (in alphabetical order) of the dozens of erotic and sadistic activities she enjoys, among them blindfolds, candle wax, dacryphilia (arousal from tears), doctor/nurse fetish, infantilism/diapers, and rack/medieval devices.
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  12. disappointedly
  13. emotograph
    • 2007 March 2, William Grimes, “The Tangled Web of the Truth Machine”, New York Times:
      Mr. Larson and Mr. Keeler, both of them wild, willful and unstable, would become Mr. Vollmer’s delinquent sons, at each other’s throats in a bitter struggle to control the future of the lie detector (also called the emotograph and the respondograph early on).
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  14. flyout
  15. hitless
  16. humanistically
    • 2007 March 2, James R. Oestreich, “Musing on the Barenboim X-Factor”, New York Times:
      And he loves the sort of political rough and tumble that a humanistically engaged music director would undoubtedly encounter in New York.
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  17. interleague
  18. intrasquad
  19. mezuzot
    • 2007 March 2, Lily Koppel, “Letter by Letter, Sacred Documents Are Reborn”, New York Times:
      Aside from working on Torahs, Rabbi Eisenbach also makes mezuzot, the small cases containing biblical passages that are mounted on doorposts by observant Jews, and tefillin, the black leather boxes worn on the forehead and upper arm by observant men during weekday morning prayers.
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  20. midmountain
  21. minicamp
    • 2007 March 2, Oakley Brooks, “Pro Football Grooms 3 Legs, With the Goal of a Billion Eyes”, New York Times:
      In November, the players got a taste of these live components at an NFL Europe minicamp in Cologne, Germany, and N.F.L. officials hope a season in Europe this spring will more fully prepare them.
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  22. multitracked
    • 2007 March 2, The New York Times, “Pop and Rock Listings”, New York Times:
      On her captivating new album, “We Made This Ourselves” (Ba Da Bing), her voice is multitracked in precise harmonies that can be warm or ghostly.
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  23. museumware
    • 2007 March 2, Edward Rothstein, “Captain Smith, the Tides Are Shifting on the James”, New York Times:
      Yet a price is paid for the latest in museumware and historical thinking: One isn’t quite sure what is being celebrated or why, or whether in fact a celebration is even occurring.
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  24. nonabstract
    • 2007 March 2, Roberta Smith, “Visions That Flaunt Cartoon Pedigrees”, New York Times:
      Whether this payoff compensates for the emaciated effect of the work as a whole is debatable; it certainly lacks the punch of Ms. Williams’s nonabstract, savagely comical early feminist paintings, one of which appears in the catalog.
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  25. nonbustling
  26. nonsupervised
  27. pancuronium
  28. parodically
    • 2007 March 2, The New York Times, “Pop and Rock Listings”, New York Times:
      SCISSOR SISTERS (Tomorrow) You would be forgiven if you didn’t know this was one of the most popular New York City bands in the world: despite Top 10 success in Britain with its almost parodically falsetto-heavy disco-soul, the Scissor Sisters have struggled for attention at home.
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  29. pedicabbing
  30. prehuman
    • 2007 March 2, The New York Times, “Spare Times”, New York Times:
      In the recently opened Anne and Bernard Spitzer Hall of Human Origins, there are more than 200 casts of prehuman and human fossils and artifacts that illustrate stages in physical and behavioral evolution.
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  31. recertification
  32. reinspection
  33. resentence
    • 2007 March 2, “Arts, Briefly”, New York Times:
      Judge Melissa C. Jackson said the rapper’s sentence would continue her current six months’ probation but warned against other probation violations, saying, “I’m reserving the right to resentence you to jail for one year.” Ms. Brown, 27, whose real name is Inga Marchand , was arrested on Feb. 15 in connection with a dispute at a beauty supply store in Pembroke Pines, Fla., where she was charged with simple battery and resisting an officer.
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  34. respondograph
    • 2007 March 2, William Grimes, “The Tangled Web of the Truth Machine”, New York Times:
      Mr. Larson and Mr. Keeler, both of them wild, willful and unstable, would become Mr. Vollmer’s delinquent sons, at each other’s throats in a bitter struggle to control the future of the lie detector (also called the emotograph and the respondograph early on).
      add
  35. snubnose
    • 2007 March 2, William Grimes, “The Tangled Web of the Truth Machine”, New York Times:
      >. Double indemnity; the postman always rings twice: everyone knows that fate comes back to bite you,” Mr. Alder writes at one point, strapping on his snubnose .38.
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  36. sofers
  37. tearlessly
    • 2007 March 2, Jennifer Dunning, “Deconstructing the Costs, and Emotions, of Warfare”, New York Times:
      She speaks, tearlessly and with mundane purpose to two officials who force her to parse her account into fragments before they translate them into Arabic in a scene of rabbit-hole madness.
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  38. tippees
  39. unaudited
  40. uncompellingly
  41. underrecognized
  42. unphotographable
    • 2007 March 2, The New York Times, “Museum and Gallery Listings”, New York Times:
      His white-on-white pictures are practically unphotographable.
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  43. unsentimentally
    • 2007 March 2, Jennifer Dunning, “Deconstructing the Costs, and Emotions, of Warfare”, New York Times:
      Mr. Forsythe avoids those pitfalls, perhaps because he has worked in Europe for more than 30 years and thus escaped a move toward abstraction in America, one that has handicapped American dance artists interested in traditionally dramatic or narrative choreography and performance. e. Three Atmospheric Studies,” performed by the Forsythe Company on Wednesday night at the Brooklyn Academy of Music , is powerfully, unsentimentally dry, a study of the ways words can be used or twisted to communicate nothing.
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  44. wavery
    • 2007 March 2, Jon Pareles, “Everything Crumbles Toward Eternities”, New York Times:
      Like Mr. Young, Mr. Linkous has a high, wavery voice and a gift for placing hallucinatory thoughts in blunt monosyllables: “Oh yeah, here come the pain birds.”
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Sequestered[edit]

  1. ballerhinos
    • 2007 March 2, The New York Times, “Dance Listings”, New York Times:
      The ballerhinos invade Princeton tomorrow at 8 p.m.
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  2. runnin