User:Visviva/NYT 20070309

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to: navigation, search
← Previous (2007-03-08) Words harvested from the New York Times, 2007-03-09
  • List status: open
→ Next (2007-03-10)

This is a list of lowercase non-hyphenated single words found in the 2007-03-09 issue of the New York Times which did not have English entries in the English Wiktionary when this list was created (2009-02-02).

[ see all NYT pages ] - [ see all tracking lists ]

103546 tokens ‧ 72590 valid lowercase tokens ‧ 9343 types ‧ 55 (~ 0.589%) words before cleaning ‧ 

2007-03-09[edit]

  1. archivally
    • 2007 March 9, The New York Times, “Theater Listings”, New York Times:
      Otherwise, this archivally exact production, directed by Bob Avian, feels like a vintage car that has been taken out of the garage, polished up and sent on the road once again (2:00).
      add
  2. autoharp
    • 2007 March 9, Jon Pareles, “Three Bands on Trips That Lead to the ’60s”, New York Times:
      Mr. Droste is usually the more ethereal, with the sweeter voice and the gentler melodies; he was the one strumming an autoharp for “Lullabye,” while Mr. Bear tapped a glockenspiel, and Christopher Taylor played a flute. Mr. Rossen, whose high voice blends with Mr. Droste’s when Grizzly Bear sings oohs and ahs, brought heftier guitar chords and touches of 1950s-rock twang to a song like “The Knife.”
      add
  3. bohemianism
  4. burlwood
    • 2007 March 9, Wendy Moonan, “Dealers and Collectors Make the Pilgrimage to Maastricht”, New York Times:
      Grace Wu Bruce, a Hong Kong dealer in Chinese furniture, has a magnificent cloud-spandrel Ming painting table and a rare set of four Ming stools, all in prized huanghuali wood, and a sloping-stile cabinet with figured burlwood doors.
      add
  5. bustiers
  6. cathartically
  7. cefepime
    • 2007 March 9, “Healthy Cattle and Healthy Humans”, New York Times:
      The human version, known as cefepime, is typically administered intravenously in a hospital to treat severe pneumonia or other serious infections.
      add
  8. cefquinome
    • 2007 March 9, “Healthy Cattle and Healthy Humans”, New York Times:
      Now an animal health company wants to sell a veterinary version, known as cefquinome, to treat beef cattle that are suffering from bovine respiratory disease, the most common cause of illness in cattle.
      add
  9. chanties
    • 2007 March 9, The New York Times, “Spare Times: For Children”, New York Times:
      He and his friends have brought this tour to the New Victory Theater, with everything from sea chanties to his renditions of Carl Sandburg’s “American Songbag.”
      add
  10. chromolithograph
    • 2007 March 9, Bridget L. Goodbody, “An Image Consultant to a Spinmeister Czar”, New York Times:
      The rooms — represented here in a chromolithograph by a contemporary of his — boast lush vegetal wall patterns, ornate vaulted ceilings and gemlike colors intertwined with Russian Orthodox styles and symbols of the czar like the double-headed eagle.
      add
  11. counterquestion
    • 2007 March 9, Richard Sandomir, “Baseball Bends on TV Plan, but Doubts Linger”, New York Times:
      This leads to a counterquestion — why can’t M.L.B. be happy to initiate its channel with a combined guaranteed 30 million subscribers?
      add
  12. crispbreads
    • 2007 March 9, Michiko Kakutani, “Ladies’ Choice: Snooker or Security?”, New York Times:
      She describes how Irina, left at home during one of Lawrence’s extended business trips, feels herself turning “into one of those dry Scandinavian crispbreads that never have enough salt.”
      add
  13. distortive
  14. drumlins
    • 2007 March 9, Stephen Regenold, “Tough Tests With Softer Footing”, New York Times:
      “It’s a visually stimulating course,” Mr. Decker said of the 50-mile-long race trail, which rolls through deep woods and past the strange glacier-affected geology of the area, including kettles, kames, erratics and drumlins.
      add
  15. erratics
    • 2007 March 9, Stephen Regenold, “Tough Tests With Softer Footing”, New York Times:
      “It’s a visually stimulating course,” Mr. Decker said of the 50-mile-long race trail, which rolls through deep woods and past the strange glacier-affected geology of the area, including kettles, kames, erratics and drumlins.
      add
  16. feminisms
  17. gemlike
    • 2007 March 9, Bridget L. Goodbody, “An Image Consultant to a Spinmeister Czar”, New York Times:
      The rooms — represented here in a chromolithograph by a contemporary of his — boast lush vegetal wall patterns, ornate vaulted ceilings and gemlike colors intertwined with Russian Orthodox styles and symbols of the czar like the double-headed eagle.
      add
  18. huanghuali
    • 2007 March 9, Wendy Moonan, “Dealers and Collectors Make the Pilgrimage to Maastricht”, New York Times:
      Grace Wu Bruce, a Hong Kong dealer in Chinese furniture, has a magnificent cloud-spandrel Ming painting table and a rare set of four Ming stools, all in prized huanghuali wood, and a sloping-stile cabinet with figured burlwood doors.
      add
  19. ironworking
  20. jabby
    • 2007 March 9, The New York Times, “Pop and Rock Listings”, New York Times:
      ★ CLINIC (Tonight) Dressed in surgical masks, this Liverpool band plays jabby, frantic rock with spikes of guitar noise and a beat that sounds like a countdown to something terrible.
      add
  21. kazoolike
    • 2007 March 9, Anthony Tommasini, “Four Quartets, Written by One Man Over Half a Century”, New York Times:
      With its sci-fi touches, the taped element that Mr. Kirchner incorporates into his Third Quartet may strike some as a little quaint today: oscillating figurations, percolating plunks and bloops, kazoolike slides, birdlike whistles, rapid-fire explosions of skittish pitches.
      add
  22. mandalalike
    • 2007 March 9, Holland Cotter, “The Art of Feminism as It First Took Shape”, New York Times:
      Two of the artists who were with her there, Judy Chicago and Sheila Levrant de Bretteville, are also in the show, with Ms. Chicago’s mandalalike paintings representing a genitally centered, “essentialist” brand of feminism that many other artists rejected.
      add
  23. mastersinger
    • 2007 March 9, The New York Times, “Classical Music/Opera Listings”, New York Times:
      The voice of the veteran bass James Morris may be a little patchy these days, but he inhabits the role of Hans Sachs, the wise cobbler and beloved mastersinger, singing with compelling integrity and nobility.
      add
  24. methedrine
    • 2007 March 9, The New York Times, “Movie Guide and Film Series”, New York Times:
      ‘ROCK BOTTOM’ (No rating, 75 minutes) This graphic documentary by Jay Corcoran is a strong, scary examination of the crystal methedrine epidemic among gay men in New York.
      add
  25. milonga
    • 2007 March 9, Jon Pareles, “Mining Life’s Complexities for the Playful and Pensive”, New York Times:
      Along with his own songs he played Radiohead’s “High and Dry” (reset to a South American rhythm, a milonga) and the Brazilian songwriter Arnaldo Antunes’s “Disneylandia.” Mr. Drexler plucked light, firm syncopations on his guitar and sang in the kind of high, sweet tenor that often seems to go with pop intellectualism.
      add
  26. monochromes
    • 2007 March 9, The New York Times, “Museum and Gallery Listings”, New York Times:
      Her subjects include landscape, still life, her own behind; Mondrian, monochromes and English painting are evoked.
      add
  27. multitrack
  28. nonexclusivity
    • 2007 March 9, Richard Sandomir, “Baseball Bends on TV Plan, but Doubts Linger”, New York Times:
      Carey said that nonexclusivity always lurked as a possibility (and why not, if it let more fans into the out-of-market tent?), but the chances of making it a reality waxed and waned.
      add
  29. nonfeminists
    • 2007 March 9, Holland Cotter, “The Art of Feminism as It First Took Shape”, New York Times:
      Ԡas well as why certain artists, including the many male artists informed by feminist thinking, are absent, and self-declared nonfeminists like Marina Abramovic are present.
      add
  30. nonfundamentalist
  31. nonmanagement
    • 2007 March 9, Nick Bunkley, “Ford to Give Bonuses to All”, New York Times:
      Bonuses for other nonmanagement employees range from $300 to $800.
      add
  32. ornamentalism
    • 2007 March 9, The New York Times, “Art in Review”, New York Times:
      Produced for export to Europe, the tray is ornamentalism as orientalism, sure to appeal, now as then, to a Westerner’s magpie eye and taste for the exotic.
      add
  33. outhustled
    • 2007 March 9, The Associated Press, “Maryland Shocked by Miami”, New York Times:
      The Hurricanes dressed eight scholarship players because of injuries and a suspension, but they outhustled and outworked the Terrapins for their fourth victory in the last 14 games.
      add
  34. overemoting
    • 2007 March 9, Steve Smith, “Of Coyotes, Men and Tribal Memory”, New York Times:
      Two tenors — William Ferguson as the grown Jason, and Arnold Rawls as Standing Bear — sang powerfully, although each occasionally succumbed to a stock overemoting better suited to Italian verismo.
      add
  35. phrenological
    • 2007 March 9, The New York Times, “Museum and Gallery Listings”, New York Times:
      Literally, in one case: after letting his hair grow for a year, he cut it off as a kind of performance and phrenological gag.
      add
  36. piglike
    • 2007 March 9, Wendy Moonan, “Dealers and Collectors Make the Pilgrimage to Maastricht”, New York Times:
      Littleton & Hennessy, specialists in Asian art in New York and London, may have the most expensive Chinese antique in the fair: a $12 million bronze wine vessel shaped like a tapir (a tropical piglike animal).
      add
  37. preapproved
    • 2007 March 9, Reuters, “Ex-Gateway Officers Found Liable in Trial”, New York Times:
      The S.E.C. charged that Mr. Todd inflated revenue by offering preapproved financing to people whose previous credit applications had been rejected by Gateway.
      add
  38. prehuman
    • 2007 March 9, The New York Times, “Spare Times”, New York Times:
      In the recently opened Anne and Bernard Spitzer Hall of Human Origins, there are more than 200 casts of prehuman and human fossils and artifacts that illustrate stages in physical and behavioral evolution.
      add
  39. reappreciation
  40. renamings
    • 2007 March 9, Patrick Mcgeehan, “No Community Board Approval for a Jerry Orbach Corner”, New York Times:
      His regular-guy appearance and lifestyle made him a sentimental favorite among the board members, who have routinely rejected applications for street renamings in the last few years.
      add
  41. rewrapping
    • 2007 March 9, Stuart Elliott, “Saturn Goes Back to Warm and Fuzzy”, New York Times:
      In rewrapping the trophy before he went to FedEx on Monday to ship it back, he added, “I tried to remember exactly how it was done.”
      add
  42. saltboxes
  43. sweatily
    • 2007 March 9, The New York Times, “Pop and Rock Listings”, New York Times:
      Shout Out Out Out Out, a six-piece from Edmonton, Alberta, that includes four bassists, grooves along happily and sweatily with bubbling synthesizers and robotic vocals.
      add
  44. swoony
    • 2007 March 9, Alessandra Stanley, “Having Your Beefcake and Talking About It, Too”, New York Times:
      “Desperate Housewives,” which started ABC on its swoony course, still has a satiric edge, yet even there Susan (Teri Hatcher) has two handsome suitors vying for her hand — and armed with dueling diamond rings.
      add
  45. tipoff
  46. unrigorous
  47. untraditional
    • 2007 March 9, The New York Times, “Museum and Gallery Listings”, New York Times:
      This majestic show makes a great case for Mr. Wall as the most complete, if traditional, of the untraditional artists who emerged from the turmoil of Conceptual Art. His often immense color transparencies are enthralling visual vehicles, intent on giving pleasure while making a point or two about society, art, history, visual perception, the human animal or all of the above.
      add
  48. unwealthy

Sequestered[edit]

  1. indiesphere
    • 2007 March 9, The New York Times, “Pop and Rock Listings”, New York Times:
      ★ SHINS (Wednesday) The Shins emerged from Albuquerque at the turn of the millennium with a sound that slowly but inevitably catapulted them to the upper ranks of the indiesphere: wistful and acoustic, with an adventurousness that sometimes leads to something like psychedelia.
      add