User:Visviva/NYT 20070311

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This is a list of lowercase non-hyphenated single words found in the 2007-03-11 issue of the New York Times which did not have English entries in the English Wiktionary when this list was created (2009-02-02).

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182717 tokens ‧ 136022 valid lowercase tokens ‧ 13967 types ‧ 117 (~ 0.838%) words before cleaning ‧ 

2007-03-11[edit]

  1. adobes
    • 2007 March 11, Ralph Blumenthal, “Prosecutor’s Ouster Shifts Political Order”, New York Times:
      SANTA FE, N.M., March 9 — The snow-dusted mesas and million-dollar adobes look enchanting as ever, but the political landscape here has shifted sharply since the Justice Department ousted a onetime Republican darling as United States attorney in New Mexico after party loyalists complained that he was not tough enough on crooked Democrats.
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  2. ambivalences
    • 2007 March 11, Tony Judt, “Defender of the Faith”, New York Times:
      The author is perfectly entitled to his cultural irritations: Europe since the death of Pius XII (1958), for Burleigh, has become “a post-Christian desert”; “Sneering at the ambivalences of authority has become habitual since the 1960s”; European “public culture is dominated by sneering secularists,” etc.
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  3. animalized
    • 2007 March 11, Alex Needham, “Rave Rage”, New York Times:
      Almost all of them sport scary stylized masks, ranging from the animalized to the surreal (like Coco Rojo’s futuristic punk-rock-clown design).
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  4. antinarcotics
    • 2007 March 11, Simon Romero, “Bush Heads to Colombia as Scandal Taints Alliance”, New York Times:
      Mr. Santos, the vice president, said the supply of Colombian cocaine to the United States would be even greater without American antinarcotics aid. Mr. Bush is expected to stand by Mr. Uribe at a time when explicit allies in the region remain scarce.
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  5. aperitivo
    • 2007 March 11, S.S. Fair, “Lady Slings the Booze”, New York Times:
      But how else to salute Campari, the classic aperitivo, without mentioning the Samurai Spouse?
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  6. applewood
    • 2007 March 11, Oliver Schwaner-Albright, “Race for the Cured”, New York Times:
      The buttery speck from La Quercia is aged up to 10 months, about twice as long as most speck, and then cold-smoked with applewood.
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  7. ardors
    • 2007 March 11, Pankaj Mishra, “September Song”, New York Times:
      Reading the private correspondence of Rilke, Pasternak and Tsvetayeva, she confesses that “their ardors and their tenacities feel like raft, beacon, beach.”
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  8. barfight
    • 2007 March 11, Ron Powers, “Unsivilized”, New York Times:
      Later he will knock the teeth out of a small black boy; abet a grotesquely fat, lizard-skinned “preacher” in the casual abduction, sodomizing and murder of the same child — “abet” him by shooting the child’s father in the throat; soon afterward choke and drown the depraved preacher himself; choke to death an elderly half-wit and then burn his house; lacerate a man’s mouth with broken glass in a barfight, and ogle Becky Thatcher’s braided pigtails from behind.
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  9. bek
    • 2007 March 11, Michael Chabon, “Gentlemen of the Road”, New York Times:
      The surviving captains could not come to agreement on whether they ought to pursue and punish the Rus or return to Atil and face condemnation, possibly execution, by the bek for having disobeyed his direct order that no one interfere with or harass the Northmen in their “trading mission” among the peoples of the littoral.
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  10. boathook
    • 2007 March 11, Michael Chabon, “Gentlemen of the Road”, New York Times:
      After that, Hanukkah curled up on the steps of the mosque and withdrew into sleep and his dream of Sarah, of the faint smell of burning sandalwood when she took his head into her lap, a dream from which Amram’s horny toe now dislodged him with all the tenderness of a boathook.
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  11. boubous
    • 2007 March 11, Michael Kamber, “A Continent Away, Heartbreak Over Relatives Once Seen as Lucky”, New York Times:
      In Bamako’s thriving market, a group of moneychangers in brightly colored boubous, the traditional robes worn here, said that Moussa Magassa, who owns the house in the Bronx where his family and the Soumares lived and who lost five children in the blaze, stopped by once or twice a year on his trips home to Mali and was well known in the community.
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  12. brmmm
  13. chargeback
    • 2007 March 11, Stephen J. Dubner And Steven D. Levitt, “Identity Crisis”, New York Times:
      At that point, the credit-card issuer, let’s say Citibank, sends a ‘chargeback’ through the interchange system to the acquiring bank, and that $1,000 is taken right out of Sony’s bank account, and they also get hit with a $25 chargeback fee.”
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  14. chianti
    • 2007 March 11, S.S. Fair, “Lady Slings the Booze”, New York Times:
      Home-schooled by his Canadian mother, the Spouse scavenged and sold scrap metal for a fistful of lire, ate horse meat without censure and lugged straw baskets home from the neighborhood osteria, where chianti flowed from spigots.
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  15. clubgoing
    • 2007 March 11, Liza Ghorbani, “A Tiki Bar Fit for a Prince”, New York Times:
      (Madonna and Guy Ritchie reportedly spent two hours there discussing the state of African orphans with the prince, who will soon trade his clubgoing for military service in Iraq.)
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  16. collegey
    • 2007 March 11, Rob Walker, “Chicer by the Dozen”, New York Times:
      Much of it is collegey, and all of it is very cheap.
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  17. coppa
    • 2007 March 11, Oliver Schwaner-Albright, “Race for the Cured”, New York Times:
      The coppa from Salumi Artisan Cured Meats is salted and sprinkled with sugar and pepper flakes, then aged for 10 weeks.
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  18. crudo
    • 2007 March 11, Oliver Schwaner-Albright, “Race for the Cured”, New York Times:
      Most prosciutto is crudo, which means salted when raw and then aged.
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  19. developable
    • 2007 March 11, Fred A. Bernstein, “Holding the Line on New Development”, New York Times:
      The plan was a victory for environmentalists looking to narrow the developable portion of southern Miami-Dade County.
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  20. doofiness
    • 2007 March 11, Richard Conniff, “Children’s Books”, New York Times:
      The illustrator, Neal Layton, gets the right number of legs and eyes on his spiders, and does so with a suitable joie de doofiness.
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  21. extraspecial
    • 2007 March 11, Abby Ellin, “Books Strew the Path to the Altar”, New York Times:
      “Not just for first weddings, but even second and third and so on.” Mr. Krebs added, “There is a tremendous market for wedding books as gifts, for bridal showers or just as something extraspecial from a mother, grandmother, sister, friends.”
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  22. firebreathers
    • 2007 March 11, Ezra Dyer, “Hatchback Slathered in Hot Sauce”, New York Times:
      But most other factory tuner cars — from BMW’s M Works, Mercedes-Benz’s AMG division, Chrysler’s SRT, Audi’s S- and RS, even Subaru’s STi — base their firebreathers on rear-drive or all-wheel-drive chassis.
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  23. florals
    • 2007 March 11, Nick Kurczewski, “Hey, Why Not Stop and Smell the Tires?”, New York Times:
      During this research, Kumho discovered that men preferred outdoorsy odors (like pine), while women were partial to florals.
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  24. glamazons
    • 2007 March 11, Maura Egan, “Still Swinging”, New York Times:
      More handsome than most of his pop-star subjects, the Cambridge-educated Whitehead squired plenty of groovy glamazons: Nico, Nathalie Delon, Niki de Saint Phalle and Dido Goldsmith.
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  25. gloxinia
    • 2007 March 11, Chris Colin, “Mr. 76759 Designs His Dream House”, New York Times:
      The imagined house is the antithesis of Mr. Wallace’s current quarters: a suburban home of about 3,500 square feet surrounded by flowers; he specified roses, gloxinia and delphiniums.
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  26. gusseted
    • 2007 March 11, Alex Needham, “Rave Rage”, New York Times:
      In his gas-guzzling designs, dress shirts have the gusseted armholes or zipped sleeves of motorcycle jackets; jeans are made of linen denim that’s meant to mimic crushed metal.
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  27. harlequinesque
    • 2007 March 11, Matthew Gurewitsch, “Admire the Footwork, but Mind the Hands”, New York Times:
      Sam Archer is the harlequinesque dancer who was trained in musical theater, while Richard Winsor is the taller, heavier-boned dancer who was trained in ballet.
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  28. henley
  29. hippielike
  30. hitwoman
    • 2007 March 11, Lola Ogunnaike, “At ‘The Agency,’ It Isn’t Pretty”, New York Times:
      On the show, the person who does most of the critiquing is Ms. Southwick, the delightfully acerbic hitwoman who has become the character to watch.
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  31. homecourt
    • 2007 March 11, The Associated Press, “Albany 60, Vermont 59”, New York Times:
      Last year’s championship game was on Albany’s homecourt.
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  32. homoerotica
    • 2007 March 11, Horacio Silva, “Muscle Man”, New York Times:
      His most radical legacy is having seduced a heterosexual public with soft-core homoerotica.
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  33. hoopsters
  34. hostessing
    • 2007 March 11, Abby Ellin, “Books Strew the Path to the Altar”, New York Times:
      “Has the art of hostessing gone so far down the tubes that no one knows how to throw a party anymore without all these books?”
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  35. ignorantest
    • 2007 March 11, Ron Powers, “Unsivilized”, New York Times:
      Investigating, the two discover “heaps of old greasy cards scattered around over the floor, and old whiskey bottles, and a couple of masks made out of black cloth; and all over the walls was the ignorantest kind of words and pictures, made with charcoal.”
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  36. intrasquad
  37. judgeships
    • 2007 March 11, “Upgrading New York’s Courts”, New York Times:
      To address the surge in child abuse and neglect reports, meanwhile, the Legislature urgently needs to authorize 39 new family court judgeships.
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  38. keema
  39. kigo
    • 2007 March 11, Holly Brubach, “Poetry in Slo-Mo”, New York Times:
      Seventeen syllables in Japanese (poets writing in English often use fewer), with a kigo, a word that announces the season (no longer mandatory) and all action in the present.
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  40. lanai
    • 2007 March 11, Tracie Rozhon, “To Have, Hold and Cherish, Until Bedtime”, New York Times:
      In Honolulu, Nancy Peacock, an architect, said her clients increasingly requested “punees,” as daybeds are known in Hawaii — sometimes on the lanai, the covered porch of the house.
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  41. lardo
    • 2007 March 11, Oliver Schwaner-Albright, “Race for the Cured”, New York Times:
      Lardo Sometimes euphemistically called “white prosciutto,” lardo is pork back fat that’s been salted and aged.
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  42. luchadores
    • 2007 March 11, Alex Needham, “Rave Rage”, New York Times:
      “Lucha Loco” (Therapy Publishing), a new photography book by Malcolm Venville, illustrates luchadores so colorful that they make “Nacho Libre” look dull.
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  43. mateys
    • 2007 March 11, Julie Just, “Bookshelf”, New York Times:
      He’s supposed to be watching his baby sister, but when his mateys show up, chaos follows.
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  44. midcycle
  45. moneychangers
    • 2007 March 11, Michael Kamber, “A Continent Away, Heartbreak Over Relatives Once Seen as Lucky”, New York Times:
      In Bamako’s thriving market, a group of moneychangers in brightly colored boubous, the traditional robes worn here, said that Moussa Magassa, who owns the house in the Bronx where his family and the Soumares lived and who lost five children in the blaze, stopped by once or twice a year on his trips home to Mali and was well known in the community.
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  46. monklike
    • 2007 March 11, Emily Brady, “The Death of a Family Man”, New York Times:
      In Flushing, he lived a monklike existence in a two-story house on Holly Avenue, where he shared an 8-foot-by-10-foot room for $225 a month.
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  47. monocausal
    • 2007 March 11, “‘Hitler’s Beneficiaries’”, New York Times:
      Far from suggesting yet another monocausal explanation for the murder of Europe’s Jews, my book examines one contributory factor that has been insufficiently considered in previous analyses: the material self-interest of the German masses.
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  48. mujahadeen
    • 2007 March 11, Mark Mazzetti, “One Bullet Away From What?”, New York Times:
      The ties between Islamic militants and Pakistan’s security services are decades old, with the two sides working together most closely during the mujahadeen battles against the Soviet Army in Afghanistan in the 1980s.
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  49. neuroendovascular
    • 2007 March 11, “Aylin Tashman and Louis Kim”, New York Times:
      Dr. Kim, 34, is a fellow in cerebrovascular and neuroendovascular neurosurgery at Barrow Neurological Institute in Phoenix.
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  50. neurolaw
    • 2007 March 11, Jeffrey Rosen, “The Brain on the Stand”, New York Times:
      The extent of that revolution is hotly debated, but the influence of what some call neurolaw is clearly growing.
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  51. newsmedia
  52. nonactors
    • 2007 March 11, Erik Piepenburg, “Reflections on Life as a Shaker-Upper”, New York Times:
      THE FIRST PRODUCTION I spent a couple of months all by myself building a set and had my filmmaker friends, nonactors, play the parts.
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  53. nouned
    • 2007 March 11, Patricia T. O’Conner, “Speech Crimes”, New York Times:
      Nouns get verbed, adjectives get nouned, prepositions can moonlight as almost anything.
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  54. operafied
    • 2007 March 11, Bernard Holland, “A Memento of Romantic Spain”, New York Times:
      There is also “Goyescas,” an operafied afterthought to Granados’s piano suite of that name.
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  55. osteria
    • 2007 March 11, S.S. Fair, “Lady Slings the Booze”, New York Times:
      Home-schooled by his Canadian mother, the Spouse scavenged and sold scrap metal for a fistful of lire, ate horse meat without censure and lugged straw baskets home from the neighborhood osteria, where chianti flowed from spigots.
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  56. overnighter
    • 2007 March 11, Steven Heighton, “Survivor”, New York Times:
      To tackle the narrative challenge of Cave’s extreme isolation (for most of the winter he’s confined to a tiny hut, lacking even the sun for solace), Harding populates his solitude through reveries of his marriage to a Danish woman, whose pregnancy and calamitous labor make his own ordeal look, at least for a while, like an overnighter in the Adirondacks.
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  57. overprecious
    • 2007 March 11, Kerry Fried, “Children’s Books / Young Adult”, New York Times:
      The book is rich and odd, and only occasionally overprecious — like that run-on subtitle, which advertises dangers and delights just a bit too strenuously.
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  58. petrostates
    • 2007 March 11, Ted Conover, “Fuel Lines”, New York Times:
      But 60 percent of America’s oil is now imported, and Margonelli is ambitious: she next visits four petrostates (Venezuela, Chad, Iran and Nigeria) and China, where oil suddenly matters a lot.
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  59. piperade
    • 2007 March 11, “Made for Walking”, New York Times:
      One of the best entrees is roasted cod, buttery in texture, with a hearty mash of polenta and piperade.
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  60. postcollegian
  61. postmedieval
    • 2007 March 11, Steven Heighton, “Survivor”, New York Times:
      It’s an inspired twist: Cave’s ordeal has transformed him into a premodern rationalist, not a postmedieval mystic.
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  62. postproduction
    • 2007 March 11, “Hannah Swacker, Jesse Kurnit”, New York Times:
      Mr. Kurnit is a producer at Quiet Man, a postproduction visual effects company in Manhattan.
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  63. primitivism
    • 2007 March 11, Will Hermes, “Guitar Heroes, Make That Heroines, in Indie Rock”, New York Times:
      But her flamboyant guitar approach also connects it to the ornate, virtuosic traditions of progressive rock and heavy metal: genres that punk once aimed to vanquish with a return to the three-chord simplicity and raw primitivism of early rock.
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  64. protectress
    • 2007 March 11, Michael Kimmelman, “The Goal Standard”, New York Times:
      In Titian’s hands, Diana, protectress of pubescent girls, became a sporty archer in tie-up sandals and bracelets, hair gathered in a loose bun, a silky tunic gaping to reveal one breast, shooting an arrow at her hunky voyeur, who has newly furry ears and a shiny nose, dogs nipping at his crotch.
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  65. proto
    • 2007 March 11, Horacio Silva, “Muscle Man”, New York Times:
      After studying economics at Bard College in New York, Ritts moved back to the West Coast; his break came in 1978 when he photographed his tenant, the proto male supermodel Matt Collins, for Italian Harper’s Bazaar.
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  66. recoupling
    • 2007 March 11, Mireya Navarro, “A Family Feud That Is Familiar”, New York Times:
      Mr. Giuliani may have been scrambling to right his campaign and preserve his presidential ambitions, but in speaking of the difficulties between his current wife and his children from a previous marriage he tapped into the struggles of millions of American families who have to regroup when a new marriage, or recoupling, follows a divorce or breakup.
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  67. rinkside
  68. salame
    • 2007 March 11, Oliver Schwaner-Albright, “Race for the Cured”, New York Times:
      Salame and Soppressata Salame is cured sausage; gourmet stores sometimes use “salame” and “soppressata” interchangeably, though soppressata is a kind of salame often made with cuts from the head of the pig.
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  69. salumeria
    • 2007 March 11, Oliver Schwaner-Albright, “Race for the Cured”, New York Times:
      Fra’ Mani, Paul Bertolli’s salumeria in Berkeley, just started making a mortadella with finely chopped (instead of puréed) Niman Ranch pork; like the real stuff from Bologna, it dissolves in your mouth.
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  70. seagrass
    • 2007 March 11, Fred A. Bernstein, “Holding the Line on New Development”, New York Times:
      According to Dick Frost, a former superintendent of the park, “If the open land adjacent to the park gets developed in any significant way, the water quality in Biscayne Bay that is necessary for the seagrass and the marine mammals and the fish and even, to some extent, the coral reef — all of that is in jeopardy.”
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  71. semianimate
    • 2007 March 11, Matthew Gurewitsch, “Admire the Footwork, but Mind the Hands”, New York Times:
      As reborn in a new theater piece by Matthew Bourne, Edward is all these things and perhaps something more: the latest member of the select circle of semianimate figures who have found a lasting home in dance.
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  72. shirtmaker
    • 2007 March 11, Herbert Muschamp, “Tie Space Continuum”, New York Times:
      Guglielmo Battistoni, the founder, started out as a shirtmaker, and the store is still best known for shirts, ties and suits, though the merchandise also includes sportswear and the usual accessories.
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  73. shortfallings
    • 2007 March 11, The New York Times, “Bush Addresses Misuse of F.B.I. Subpoenas”, New York Times:
      “I want to remind you,” Mr. Bush said, “that the I.G. report, which justly made issue of F.B.I. shortfallings, also made it clear that these letters were important to the security of the United States.”
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  74. singspiel
    • 2007 March 11, Bernard Holland, “A Memento of Romantic Spain”, New York Times:
      In ambition, Falla’s “Vida Breve” is a cut above the lighthearted, light-footed zarzuela, a form of operetta with spoken dialogue much like the singspiel or the Broadway musical.
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  75. slud
    • 2007 March 11, Patricia T. O’Conner, “Speech Crimes”, New York Times:
      It’s about the wonder of it all: the beauty, the joy, the fun of a language enriched by poets like Lily Tomlin, Fats Waller and Dizzy Dean (to whom we owe “slud,” as in “Rizzuto slud into second”).
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  76. sneakerheads
    • 2007 March 11, Michael Kimmelman, “The Goal Standard”, New York Times:
      The sneaker was sold through skateboard stores, and sneakerheads snapped it up.
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  77. softheartedness
    • 2007 March 11, Ann Hulbert, “Beyond the Pleasure Principle”, New York Times:
      A hardheadedness, but also a high-mindedness and softheartedness, seems to be at work.
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  78. songful
    • 2007 March 11, Matthew Gurewitsch, “Mistress of the Many Richard Strausses”, New York Times:
      In Strauss every major soprano role is both high and low, both songful and declamatory, with the extensions at the top and bottom more extreme than in Wagner.
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  79. soppressata
    • 2007 March 11, Oliver Schwaner-Albright, “Race for the Cured”, New York Times:
      Salame and Soppressata Salame is cured sausage; gourmet stores sometimes use “salame” and “soppressata” interchangeably, though soppressata is a kind of salame often made with cuts from the head of the pig.
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  80. sprayable
  81. stagings
    • 2007 March 11, Kim Severson, “Fed Up”, New York Times:
      “Were authenticity buffs to base their beliefs on what appears regularly on tables in homes rather than on hearsay from other food adventurers and stagings by self-interested restaurateurs,” Glassner writes, “they would have to revise their views fairly radically.
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  82. stepsiblings
    • 2007 March 11, Mireya Navarro, “A Family Feud That Is Familiar”, New York Times:
      The Census Bureau says more than 3.6 million American households, nearly 10 percent of all households with children under 18, are “blended,” meaning they include stepparents and stepsiblings or half siblings.
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  83. superlight
    • 2007 March 11, Suzy Menkes, “One Small Step for Man”, New York Times:
      Significantly, Ermenegildo Zegna, which commercialized that jacket, has a tech team dedicated to inventing things you always knew you wanted, like a suit treated to repel the cup of latte you just flung over it or a superlight outerwear jacket with breathable “pores” that open and close with the temperature.
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  84. tenacities
    • 2007 March 11, Pankaj Mishra, “September Song”, New York Times:
      Reading the private correspondence of Rilke, Pasternak and Tsvetayeva, she confesses that “their ardors and their tenacities feel like raft, beacon, beach.”
      add
  85. thunderingly
    • 2007 March 11, Ellen Barry, “Outsiders Tug at Queens Newspapers”, New York Times:
      While the distinction between Middle Village and Maspeth may be subtle to outsiders, to insiders it is thunderingly obvious.
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  86. turbaned
  87. ultralightweight
    • 2007 March 11, Suzy Menkes, “One Small Step for Man”, New York Times:
      That includes a Moncler parka, first designed for Olympic skiers, that is puffy and warm but ultralightweight; and a jacket by the same company that reverses from slick urban gray to a primary color so lifesavers can find you after an avalanche (when you’re probably already dead).
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  88. underbody
    • 2007 March 11, Ezra Dyer, “Hatchback Slathered in Hot Sauce”, New York Times:
      The aesthetic value of the Mazdaspeed 3’s smooth underbody tray will be lost on everyone but the guys in the pit at Jiffy Lube.
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  89. unsubsidized
    • 2007 March 11, Josh Barbanel, “Harlem’s Newest Beacon”, New York Times:
      The building will tower over most of central Harlem, including the 19-story Harlem State Office Building on West 125th Street, and will be by far the tallest unsubsidized building in the area.
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  90. unweaving
    • 2007 March 11, David Kirby, “Human / Nature”, New York Times:
      The answer is that we are always weaving and unweaving the history of our days, that the universe is inexhaustible, that we affirm our immortality by joining the cosmic dance that is always ending and beginning again.
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  91. unwonderful
    • 2007 March 11, Christopher Gray, “The Kings Is Dead! Long Live the Kings!”, New York Times:
      Then, there is the sad, unwonderful case of Loew’s Kings in Flatbush, Brooklyn , where Barbra Streisand was once a regular moviegoer.
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  92. utopianism
    • 2007 March 11, Pete Hamill, “Raging Thirst”, New York Times:
      In this solid account of the calamitous effect of dry utopianism on New York City, Lerner explains how the Prohibition amendment was passed and why its execution failed.
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  93. weathercasters
    • 2007 March 11, David Browne, “The Barometric Pressure Is Just the Beginning”, New York Times:
      Some weathercasters were offended, and in January, Fox News’s Steve Doocy remarked, on the air, “Does the Weather Channel suddenly have a political agenda?”
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  94. wheelspin
    • 2007 March 11, Ezra Dyer, “Hatchback Slathered in Hot Sauce”, New York Times:
      When you floor the gas, the little 4-cylinder takes a beat or two to build up some revs, and then the turbo hits so suddenly that the tires start jackhammering the pavement with wheelspin — and that’s with the traction control on.
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  95. wordies
    • 2007 March 11, Patricia T. O’Conner, “Speech Crimes”, New York Times:
      He also defends things that drive wordies crazy, like the adjective “fun” and the verb phrase “try and.”
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Sequestered[edit]

  1. abbatoir: misspelling of abattoir
    • 2007 March 11, Erica Wagner, “Unintended Consequences”, New York Times:
      It’s the summer of 1939, and Kathleen, who used to clerk in her uncle’s abbatoir, now finds herself working in a secret capacity for the British government, calcuating the damage the forthcoming air war will wreak upon the population.
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  2. deeeeeelicious
    • 2007 March 11, David Orr, “Annals of Poetry”, New York Times:
      Goodyear wants to portray the Poetry Foundation as a culturally conservative, slightly tacky enterprise led by a dilettantish, ex-Wall Street fat cat — “what people these days call a ‘businessman-poet’ ” — who’s itching to sell poems the way Frito-Lay sells Cool Ranch Doritos (and no, not by making them deeeeeelicious).
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  3. inroadside = in roadside
    • 2007 March 11, Alissa J. Rubin, “Iraq’s Leader Asks for Aid in Curbing Strife”, New York Times:
      It has recently focused much of its attention on Iran, pressing the nation to halt its nuclear program and charging that it has not only armed and financed militants throughout the region, but that it also has been providing Iraqi militants with devastating explosive devices for use inroadside bombings.
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  4. manda
    • 2007 March 11, Alex Needham, “Rave Rage”, New York Times:
      Curiosities include Máximo, who colors his hair pink to match his tiny toga, and El Pandita, who dresses like a man-panda (a manda?)
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