User:Visviva/NYT 20070313

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This is a list of lowercase non-hyphenated single words found in the 2007-03-13 issue of the New York Times which did not have English entries in the English Wiktionary when this list was created (2009-02-02).

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92052 tokens ‧ 68285 valid lowercase tokens ‧ 8520 types ‧ 51 (~ 0.599%) words before cleaning ‧ 

2007-03-13[edit]

  1. asenapine
    • 2007 March 13, Julia Werdigier, “Akzo Nobel Sells Drug Unit to Schering-Plough”, New York Times:
      For Schering-Plough, the acquisition means it will get Organon’s birth control pill Marvelon and five experimental drugs, including asenapine for schizophrenia and sugammadex, a chemical for general anesthesia.
      add
  2. bridgelike
    • 2007 March 13, Nicolai Ouroussoff, “Defying the Odds on a Project in Skid Row”, New York Times:
      From the top of the stair, tenants pass beneath the bridgelike form of the community room before entering a small courtyard framed by five stories of apartments on three sides.
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  3. buzzy
  4. counterbid
    • 2007 March 13, Eric Sylvers, “Swisscom Makes Offer for FastWeb”, New York Times:
      FastWeb’s shares rose 6.30 euros, or 15 percent, to close at 48.34 euros on Monday, above the offer price, an indication that the market is expecting a counterbid higher than Swisscom’s offer.
      add
  5. desertlike
    • 2007 March 13, Holland Cotter, “Thoughtful Wanderings of a Man With a Can”, New York Times:
      For a piece called “When Faith Moves Mountains” he assembled 500 volunteers with shovels in a desertlike area near Lima, Peru, and had them move a sand dune four inches.
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  6. dolloped
    • 2007 March 13, Michael Mason, “Another Supplement, Under the Microscope”, New York Times:
      Almost overnight, it seemed, millions of consumers morphed into fervid pill poppers, and antioxidants were dolloped into an ever expanding variety of foods.
      add
  7. endosurgery
    • 2007 March 13, Barnaby J. Feder, “Boston Scientific Considers a Spinoff to Raise $1 Billion”, New York Times:
      The endosurgery products include catheters, clamps, feeding tubes, stents, lasers, and microwave and ultrasound gear used to diagnose or treat a wide range of gastrointestinal ailments, cancer and urological and gynecological conditions.
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  8. evenhandedness
    • 2007 March 13, Jennifer Dunning, “Play and Ritual in the Village, an Unseen Terror at the Gates”, New York Times:
      The production’s evenhandedness may have been the contribution of Mr. Yamazaki, the director of the Japanese modern-dance company Fluid Hug-Hug. The sudden and incongruous appearance of a white-dusted figure certainly had the look of Butoh, from which Mr. Yamazaki partly draws choreographic inspiration.
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  9. folklorish
    • 2007 March 13, Dave Kehr, “New DVDs”, New York Times:
      An experimenter in his early days (“Black and White,” from the 1930s, is a devastating account of American racism, covered in a few boldly graphic images), Mr. Ivanov-Vano soon mastered Disney’s anthropomorphic animals, painterly backgrounds and cozy, folklorish tone.
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  10. forechecker
    • 2007 March 13, Matt Higgins, “Defenses Find Way to Beat New Rules”, New York Times:
      In its 3-2 victory against Buffalo on Wednesday, Colorado mostly played a 1-2-2, using only one forechecker and staggering two forwards and two defenseman in the neutral zone.
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  11. forecheckers
    • 2007 March 13, Matt Higgins, “Defenses Find Way to Beat New Rules”, New York Times:
      In defeating Buffalo by 3-2 on Saturday, the Devils relied on a 1-2-2 strategy but sometimes sent two forecheckers deep.
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  12. ganaza
  13. gastroenterological
  14. gunbattle
  15. kiddingly
  16. mainstreamer
  17. megastores
  18. metathoughts
  19. midquarter
    • 2007 March 13, The Associated Press, “Wall St. Recovery Continues, Albeit Slowly”, New York Times:
      Technology shares also received a boost ahead of a midquarter update from Texas Instruments , which tightened its financial targets after the closing bell.
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  20. militantism
    • 2007 March 13, Craig S. Smith, “Companion of Bomber in Casablanca Is Questioned”, New York Times:
      Morocco, a constitutional monarchy that is friendly to the West, has struggled to curb growing Islamic fundamentalism and has battled persistent militantism in a small segment of that movement that wants to establish an Islamic theocracy.
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  21. mirrorlike
    • 2007 March 13, Jane E. Brody, “Growing Older, and Adjusting to the Dark”, New York Times:
      In addition, cats and some other nocturnal animals have a mirrorlike membrane, the tapetum, on the back of their eyes, which reflects the light passing through the rods back through them in the opposite direction.
      add
  22. modafinil
    • 2007 March 13, The Associated Press, “Coach Accepts Ban”, New York Times:
      Korchemny, who was sentenced to probation in the Bay Area Laboratory Co-operative case for supplying the banned stimulant modafinil, was essentially retired before agreeing that he will not participate with any organization that recognizes the World Anti-Doping Code.
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  23. mudbrick
    • 2007 March 13, John Noble Wilford, “Philistines, but Less and Less Philistine”, New York Times:
      The locally made storage jar, bearing seven signs, was found several years ago buried under debris of a mudbrick building, which appeared to date to no later than 1000 B. C. After the 10th century, the Philistines borrowed their Israelite neighbors’ Old Hebrew script and alphabet then evolving from Phoenician writing.
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  24. nonmicrobial
  25. nonpunitive
  26. nonwood
    • 2007 March 13, Sewell Chan, “Council Moves Toward Ban on Metal High School Bats”, New York Times:
      On Sunday, Richard M. Greenwald, one of the Brown researchers, wrote that he knew of no scientific data to support the notion “that the use of nonwood bats poses an unacceptable risk to children, particularly high school competitive players,” according to an e-mail message released by Easton Sports.
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  27. overdiagnosis
    • 2007 March 13, H. Gilbert Welch, Steven Woloshin And Lisa M. Schwartz, “How Two Studies on Cancer Screening Led to Two Results”, New York Times:
      Because all lung cancer patients get treated, overdiagnosis means some people receive treatment that can’t help them (because they do not need it) and can only cause harm.
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  28. pantonal
  29. petrosexuals
  30. prelaugh
    • 2007 March 13, John Tierney, “What’s So Funny? Well, Maybe Nothing”, New York Times:
      “Most prelaugh dialogue,” Professor Provine concluded in “Laughter,” his 2000 book, “is like that of an interminable television situation comedy scripted by an extremely ungifted writer.”
      add
  31. premenopausal
  32. pretrap
    • 2007 March 13, Matt Higgins, “Defenses Find Way to Beat New Rules”, New York Times:
      Fast, skilled teams like the Sabres thrived, providing flashbacks to the pretrap era of the 1980s.
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  33. scrims
    • 2007 March 13, Nicolai Ouroussoff, “Defying the Odds on a Project in Skid Row”, New York Times:
      Perhaps most important, he had to drop a series of metal scrims that would have shaded the walkways overlooking the courtyard, lending the space a more ethereal, filtered aura.
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  34. stealthlike
    • 2007 March 13, Craig S. Smith, “The Classic British Sports Car From China”, New York Times:
      It is a cautious, even stealthlike approach, and a stark contrast to Japan and Korea, which spent billions of dollars over decades to build recognized brands through exports before establishing a high-profile corporate presence overseas.
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  35. strobelike
    • 2007 March 13, Dave Kehr, “New DVDs”, New York Times:
      Florinda Bolkan (“A Brief Vacation” ) is a wealthy Englishwoman whose dream that she has murdered the coke-sniffing, sexually omnivorous Swedish model next door has apparently come true. Mr. Fulci finds intelligent and expressive use for many of the most annoying mannerisms of ’70s filmmaking — the aimless zooms; the wobbly, hand-held panning shots; the rapid-fire, strobelike editing — as he creates a radically unstable visual environment for the disintegrating heroine.
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  36. sugammadex
    • 2007 March 13, Julia Werdigier, “Akzo Nobel Sells Drug Unit to Schering-Plough”, New York Times:
      For Schering-Plough, the acquisition means it will get Organon’s birth control pill Marvelon and five experimental drugs, including asenapine for schizophrenia and sugammadex, a chemical for general anesthesia.
      add
  37. tapetum
    • 2007 March 13, Jane E. Brody, “Growing Older, and Adjusting to the Dark”, New York Times:
      In addition, cats and some other nocturnal animals have a mirrorlike membrane, the tapetum, on the back of their eyes, which reflects the light passing through the rods back through them in the opposite direction.
      add
  38. undeciphered
    • 2007 March 13, John Noble Wilford, “Philistines, but Less and Less Philistine”, New York Times:
      He said the script had some characteristics of Linear A, the writing system used in the Aegean from 1650 B. C. to 1450 B. C. This undeciphered script was supplanted by another, Linear B, which was identified with the Minoan civilization of Crete and was finally decoded in the mid-20th century.
      add
  39. ungifted
    • 2007 March 13, John Tierney, “What’s So Funny? Well, Maybe Nothing”, New York Times:
      “Most prelaugh dialogue,” Professor Provine concluded in “Laughter,” his 2000 book, “is like that of an interminable television situation comedy scripted by an extremely ungifted writer.”
      add
  40. upliftment
    • 2007 March 13, Nicolai Ouroussoff, “Defying the Odds on a Project in Skid Row”, New York Times:
      Here architecture is used as a tool not only for aesthetic upliftment, but also to forge both a strong sense of community and a visual presence for the poor in a city that often seems to have forgotten them.
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  41. vampirish
    • 2007 March 13, Dave Kehr, “New DVDs”, New York Times:
      The “N. Khodataev Group” is credited with the 1927 “We’ll Keep Our Eyes Peeled,” about the mounting threat of war, at least as perceived by the Soviets, from the vampirish capitalists of Western Europe.
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  42. wishfulness
    • 2007 March 13, “Wrong Turn on Sex Offenders”, New York Times:
      With little public discussion and no opposition to speak of, Gov. Eliot Spitzer has made New York the latest state to travel down a murky legal road, to a place where laws are made not in response to facts, but to wishfulness and fear.
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Sequestered[edit]

  1. urb