User:Visviva/NYT 20070318

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This is a list of lowercase non-hyphenated single words found in the 2007-03-18 issue of the New York Times which did not have English entries in the English Wiktionary when this list was created (2009-02-02).

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168352 tokens ‧ 125361 valid lowercase tokens ‧ 12936 types ‧ 124 (~ 0.959%) words before cleaning ‧ 

2007-03-18[edit]

  1. apposites
    • 2007 March 18, William Safire, “Woman vs. Female”, New York Times:
      Battle of the apposites.
      add
  2. babaghuq
    • 2007 March 18, Michael Chabon, “‘Gentlemen of the Road’”, New York Times:
      “In Baghdad during the Days of Awe this year, the Muhammadans burned Jewish prayer houses and put to the sword any who would not profess Islam,” they were informed by the babaghuq, or mayor, of Sambunin, a Jewish Khazar town only four days’ ride from Atil.
      add
  3. backstrap
    • 2007 March 18, ÁMbar Past, “Truly Human”, New York Times:
      The Tzotzils planted their corn on steep, rocky slopes, wove clothes on traditional backstrap looms, ground corn by hand and patted out mountains of tortillas over smoky fires.
      add
  4. basepaths
    • 2007 March 18, Dan Rosenheck, “Manny Being Manny Is Hurting the Red Sox”, New York Times:
      Manny Ramírez is, of course, the Red Sox’ most accomplished slugger and their biggest headache, equally known for his prodigious production at the plate and his misadventures in the field and on the basepaths.
      add
  5. boattail
    • 2007 March 18, Jim Norman, “Is It the Real Thing? Or Can You Actually Drive It?”, New York Times:
      Then, there’s one of the favorite head-turners of all time, the Auburn Speedster, known as the boattail for its distinctively pointed rear end, which sold in the 1930s for less than $2,300.
      add
  6. buildingwide
    • 2007 March 18, Jay Romano, “Flip Taxes: A Pox on Sellers’ Profits”, New York Times:
      Although flip taxes are almost always imposed as a way of avoiding a buildingwide assessment or an increase in monthly maintenance or common charges, they are never very popular with apartment owners.
      add
  7. cheapjacks
    • 2007 March 18, Andrew O’Hagan, “Among the Thugs”, New York Times:
      For every Bonnie and Clyde there are a dozen pug-nosed English gunmen — sharps and cheapjacks, hammerers and con men — called things like “Monkey” Benneyworth, Ronald “Buster” Edwards and “Mad Frankie” Fraser.
      add
  8. chulent
    • 2007 March 18, Jennifer Bleyer, “‘City of Refuge’”, New York Times:
      As Mr. Schonfeld climbed the stairs, he was carrying a steaming 18-quart pot containing the traditional Sabbath stew known as chulent.
      add
  9. cineastes
  10. cinematheque
    • 2007 March 18, A. O. Scott, “The Shape of Cinema, Transformed at the Click of a Mouse”, New York Times:
      Perhaps the most intriguing promise these sites hold, at least for those whose interest in film extends beyond the new, the recent and the aggressively hyped, is of a kind of virtual cinematheque.
      add
  11. claques
    • 2007 March 18, Joseph P. Fried, “The Helper’s Helper: Where Nonprofits Turn”, New York Times:
      But rather than belonging to star-worshiping claques or camera-clicking packs, the 20 students taking notes in a Manhattan conference room recently were from a very different realm.
      add
  12. coddler
  13. communitarianism
    • 2007 March 18, “‘Medical Apartheid’”, New York Times:
      My discussion of factors that tempered or trumped racism includes economics, politics, utilitarianism, communitarianism, black complicity, white beneficence, forbidden knowledge, deontological frameworks and social-justice issues.
      add
  14. cryin
    • 2007 March 18, Will Hermes, “Indie Rapper Reseizes the Brooklyn Moment”, New York Times:
      Fell asleep late Neon buzz PTS stress We do drugs City air strange Sticky lungs Mayor Doomburg Gives no funds And I’m cryin.
      add
  15. decadelong
    • 2007 March 18, Anahad O’Connor, “A Legend of the ’60s Points the Way, Again”, New York Times:
      Randolph Horner, a member of the Woodstock Environmental Commission and an author of the measure, said the town chose the decadelong timeline because scientists who study global warming say the world has 10 years “before reaching an irreversible tipping point.”
      add
  16. discocentric
  17. dorkiness
    • 2007 March 18, Neal Stephenson, “It’s All Geek to Me”, New York Times:
      They made peace with their own dorkiness long ago.
      add
  18. dubby
    • 2007 March 18, Kelefa Sanneh, “At Home in Their Niches. And Breaking Out.”, New York Times:
      Just what this song needed: some crashing synthetic drums and some extended dubby breaks, along with choral buildups that make a grandiose rock ballad even grandioser.
      add
  19. dutybound
    • 2007 March 18, Randy Cohen, “Tuition Trick”, New York Times:
      Financial pressures might make your husband feel trapped in his current job, but unless he contemplates an imminent departure which he apparently does not he has only a hypothetical problem and not one that you are dutybound to alleviate with your wallet.
      add
  20. econobox
    • 2007 March 18, Lawrence Ulrich, “There’s More Than Meets the Eye”, New York Times:
      Soon after, John Cooper’s transformation of this simple econobox into a rally-racing world champion made the Mini an international phenomenon.
      add
  21. elbling
    • 2007 March 18, Howard G. Goldberg, “German Grapes From Two Eras”, New York Times:
      At Red, White and Bubbly, 211 Fifth Avenue (Union Street), Park Slope, Brooklyn, the elbling ($10.95) and Dornfelder ($12.49) are good values.
      add
  22. euphemists
    • 2007 March 18, William Safire, “Woman vs. Female”, New York Times:
      Only 27 years ago in this space, when fainthearted sociological euphemists were pushing the gentle grammatical category gender, I stood up for the plain old Anglo-Saxon word sex.
      add
  23. flagstick
    • 2007 March 18, Damon Hack, “Rollicking Ride Leaves Taylor in Lead”, New York Times:
      After Johnson hit a chip shot from the par-3 second green from 85 feet, Weekley ran over to remove the flagstick.
      add
  24. forgivably
    • 2007 March 18, Andrew O’Hagan, “Among the Thugs”, New York Times:
      Sometimes — and sometimes forgivably — Thomas tries to do too much, as when he sets out to give an account of Teddy Boy crime.
      add
  25. formalwear
    • 2007 March 18, David Shaftel, “New Digs for ‘Queen of the Fish’”, New York Times:
      These days, all the free wall space in Mr. Vandy’s store is devoted to posters advertising events that give top billing to a heavily made-up Ms. Veth, dressed in the brightly colored silk gowns that constitute traditional Khmer formalwear.
      add
  26. funnymen
    • 2007 March 18, Susan Saulny, “At Housing Project, Both Fear and Renewal”, New York Times:
      The project was popularized by the 1970s sitcom “Good Times” as a neighborhood of strivers and funnymen, but reality was more cruel: Cabrini Green was the kind of place where a young boy could be killed by sniper fire while holding his mother’s hand on the way to school, as happened in the fall of 1992.
      add
  27. gateless
  28. grandioser
    • 2007 March 18, Kelefa Sanneh, “At Home in Their Niches. And Breaking Out.”, New York Times:
      Just what this song needed: some crashing synthetic drums and some extended dubby breaks, along with choral buildups that make a grandiose rock ballad even grandioser.
      add
  29. groovester
    • 2007 March 18, David Kamp, “With the Band”, New York Times:
      The band members still work day jobs and live in Echo Park and Silver Lake, locus of Los Angeles’s shabby groovester scene.
      add
  30. groundball
    • 2007 March 18, The Associated Press, “Harden Is Back and Strong for the A’s”, New York Times:
      “Sometimes I’d like to be more like a groundball pitcher and get some outs early in the count,” Harden said.
      add
  31. guerrillalike
  32. halfcourt
  33. harlequinesque
  34. hayforks
    • 2007 March 18, Michael Chabon, “‘Gentlemen of the Road’”, New York Times:
      Creaking leather and the snorting of mules, snatches of off-key ballads, the clop of hooves and the patter of bare soles, the rattle of hayforks and lances.
      add
  35. healings
    • 2007 March 18, Ben Gibberd, “Look Who’s Talking”, New York Times:
      “Most people who come to me for healings are already open to some level,” she said.
      add
  36. imaginer
    • 2007 March 18, Terrence Rafferty, “Ice Men”, New York Times:
      Although Simmons, as a professional purveyor of horror and fantasy, is no dim imaginer, he has his work cut out for him.
      add
  37. interleague
  38. interpersonally
  39. janjaweed
  40. jivey
    • 2007 March 18, David Kamp, “With the Band”, New York Times:
      Apart from the complainer, whose jivey patter and elliptical remarks about his past suggest a majorly psycho-damaged life and a deep investment of thought on the author’s part, the book’s characters are a bunch of juvenile twerps.
      add
  41. kagan
    • 2007 March 18, Michael Chabon, “‘Gentlemen of the Road’”, New York Times:
      In closing, the babaghuq quoted a remark widely attributed in the north to Buljan, who claimed in turn to have only been transmitting the wisdom of the kagan, Zachariah, sequestered in his forbidden palace on a sacred island:
      add
  42. kang
    • 2007 March 18, David Lague, “Chinese Village Struggles to Save Dying Language”, New York Times:
      SANJIAZI, China — Seated cross-legged in her farmhouse on the kang, a brick sleeping platform warmed by a fire below, Meng Shujing lifted her chin and sang a lullaby in Manchu, softly but clearly.
      add
  43. koa
    • 2007 March 18, Anne Eisenberg, “How to Soften the Edges of Technology”, New York Times:
      The outer frame is made of koa and maple. Mr. Falzone did the rough cuts with a table saw; after that, almost all the work was done with hand tools.
      add
  44. kvell
  45. leopardwood
    • 2007 March 18, Anne Eisenberg, “How to Soften the Edges of Technology”, New York Times:
      Suissa Computers , based outside Toronto (www.suissacomputers.com ), offers high-performance desktop computers in cases of oak, walnut, zebrawood, purpleheart, mahogany, maple and leopardwood, among others.
      add
  46. locha
    • 2007 March 18, Simon Romero, “Venezuela to Give Currency New Name and Numbers”, New York Times:
      The decisions to rename the currency and reintroduce the unusual coin, known here as the locha, a term thought to derive from an anachronistic practice of dividing monetary units into eighths, have dumbfounded many Venezuelans.
      add
  47. lub
    • 2007 March 18, Lisa Sanders, M.D., “Feeling the Pressure”, New York Times:
      In between the lub and dup of the normal heartbeat there was a brief, harsh murmur — like the snarl of an angry animal.
      add
  48. maca
    • 2007 March 18, G. Pascal Zachary, “Is the Key to Creativity in Your Pillbox, or in Your PC?”, New York Times:
      The gap between what the Internet promises and what it delivers is part of the reason that people, seeking higher states of consciousness and creativity, continue to turn to enhancers from caffeine to maca to virtual reality.
      add
  49. malapropic
    • 2007 March 18, Bernard Holland, “Schumann Retouched, Mendelssohn Revisited”, New York Times:
      EUGENE ORMANDY, a conductor known for malapropic pronouncements at rehearsals of the Philadelphia Orchestra , once said (more or less), “Stravinsky wanted it like this, but he’s dead, poor man, so let’s do it my way.”
      add
  50. maneuverings
  51. microcar
    • 2007 March 18, Barnaby J. Feder, “Daring to Bet That Americans Would Take a Shine to Imports”, New York Times:
      In addition, Executive Motors enjoyed the dubious, unprofitable distinction of dealing in such obscure marques as Glas (“the poor man’s Porsche”), Stanguellini (a racing car that never made a successful transition to consumer sports car) and the Janus (a microcar from Zündapp, a German motorcycle maker, with a mid-mounted engine and a body almost identical at the front and the rear).
      add
  52. midtour
    • 2007 March 18, David Kamp, “With the Band”, New York Times:
      For one thing, how can fiction compete with the flamboyant reality of Iggy Pop or Little Richard, or the guy from the original lineup of Fleetwood Mac who bolted from his band midtour to join a religious cult?
      add
  53. mischaracterizations
    • 2007 March 18, “‘Medical Apartheid’”, New York Times:
      I have been allotted 650 words, insufficient for a point-by-point refutation, so I’ll address a smattering of his many mischaracterizations and errors.
      add
  54. moshavim
    • 2007 March 18, Dina Kraft, “Sudanese in Israel Hope They Have Found a Home”, New York Times:
      After rounds of Supreme Court appeals, parliamentary hearings and a public push by human rights groups, some of the detained Sudanese are beginning to be released to collective farms known as kibbutzim and moshavim, while their official refugee status can be determined and a country of asylum found.
      add
  55. multileveled
    • 2007 March 18, Gary Kamiya, “The Nomad”, New York Times:
      Whether it’s musical, spiritual, emotional, it’s a multileveled attack.
      add
  56. multiplatforming
    • 2007 March 18, Harry Hurt Iii, “The Ubiquitous Suze Orman”, New York Times:
      In a dazzling display of multiplatforming, Ms. Orman punctuates her text with directions on how to consult suzeorman.com for more particulars on matters ranging from finding the best discount stock brokerage firms to the importance of paying off high-interest-rate credit card balances as quickly as possible.
      add
  57. nailheads
    • 2007 March 18, Michael Chabon, “‘Gentlemen of the Road’”, New York Times:
      In the teeming camps the nailheads of the night itself were loosened, it seemed to Amram, by snoring.
      add
  58. needlelike
  59. neurosyphilis
    • 2007 March 18, Brenda Wineapple, “Wessex Man”, New York Times:
      Even more recently, The Times Literary Supplement, sifting through Hardy’s ashes, ran a story suggesting that his first wife may have suffered from quaternary neurosyphilis — contracted from him.
      add
  60. nonauxiliary
    • 2007 March 18, Manny Fernandez, “2 Forces Forge a Solid Blue Line for a Slain Officer”, New York Times:
      Yesterday, on West 14th Street, the two forces stood as one, row after row in crisp blue uniforms and white gloves, as the body of a slain auxiliary officer was carried to a gray hearse on the shoulders of six nonauxiliary colleagues.
      add
  61. nonconsensual
    • 2007 March 18, “‘Medical Apartheid’”, New York Times:
      Despite Emanuel’s bewildering claim to the contrary, the “Black Stork” chapter does focus heavily upon medical research, including racialized studies that fueled involuntary sterilizations, Norplant and Depo-Provera investigations, research distortions that created the myth of the “crack baby,” and nonconsensual research with pregnant black South Carolina women.
      add
  62. noneconomists
    • 2007 March 18, Walter Kirn, “Show Me the Moneyless”, New York Times:
      Could nonpoliticians and noneconomists who are absorbed in the business of survival answer any other way?
      add
  63. nonelected
  64. nonpoliticians
    • 2007 March 18, Walter Kirn, “Show Me the Moneyless”, New York Times:
      Could nonpoliticians and noneconomists who are absorbed in the business of survival answer any other way?
      add
  65. nonpoor
    • 2007 March 18, Walter Kirn, “Show Me the Moneyless”, New York Times:
      What’s more, if they choose to drink away their agonies in the manner of Sunee, who are the nonpoor to gainsay their decision?
      add
  66. nowheresville
    • 2007 March 18, David Kamp, “With the Band”, New York Times:
      In a lovely sequence, Lethem captures the precise moment when the previously nowheresville group finds its identity, playing a song — entitled, inevitably, “Monster Eyes” — before an awed audience of hipsters: “For the band, this first public rendition of what’s instantly become their hit song is the moment when time stops its hectic flow and earth’s atmosphere expands, just a little, to make room for something new, embodied by themselves.”
      add
  67. ovariotomy
    • 2007 March 18, “‘Medical Apartheid’”, New York Times:
      For example, researchers’ own statements reveal that the experimental development of gynecologic surgeries like Caesarian section, vesicovaginal fistula repair and ovariotomy were perfected almost exclusively using enslaved black women.
      add
  68. overboost
    • 2007 March 18, Lawrence Ulrich, “There’s More Than Meets the Eye”, New York Times:
      The 177 pound-feet of peak torque holds steady from 1,500 r.p.m. to 5,000 r.p.m., though a heavy foot can bring on quick spurts of turbo overboost that raise the torque to 192 pound-feet.
      add
  69. overpreparing
    • 2007 March 18, Anthony Tommasini, “Can What You Know Affect What You Hear?”, New York Times:
      Some critics maintain that overpreparing for a review assignment will lessen the freshness of their reactions, especially for a new piece.
      add
  70. overproductive
    • 2007 March 18, Dwight Garner, “Inside the List”, New York Times:
      Halpern, who also publishes the word machine known as Joyce Carol Oates , had this to say to people who gripe about overproductive writers: “Would the Yankees complain about their cleanup hitter sending too many balls over the wall in a season?
      add
  71. overromanticized
    • 2007 March 18, Gary Kamiya, “The Nomad”, New York Times:
      Yet one also wonders whether he has overromanticized Neutrino.
      add
  72. paduak
  73. paseo
  74. passeggiata
    • 2007 March 18, “Putting Your Best Foot Forward”, New York Times:
      It remains a powerful one in most European countries, especially in the Mediterranean, where an afternoon siesta makes sense during the heat of the day, followed by a reawakening in the evening, and then a promenade, a passeggiata, or in Germanic countries a Spaziergang.
      add
  75. pillowy
    • 2007 March 18, Christopher Gray, “A Glimpse of What SoHo Used to Be”, New York Times:
      Designed by William Breger, with a giant, pillowy curve, its recessed facade cannot be seen from either end of the block, but it is astonishing when suddenly revealed.
      add
  76. pinless
    • 2007 March 18, James Poniewozik, “Pink Slip Blues”, New York Times:
      There is the single, pregnant, devoutly Catholic basket case; her married lover, praying she’ll have an abortion, who regards her like a pinless grenade; and the grieving mother, taunted daily by a “Missing” ad for her daughter that the billboard owner has not gotten around to taking down months after the little girl was found murdered.
      add
  77. preteenager
    • 2007 March 18, Dave Itzkoff, “Please Don’t Tell Her She’s Funny for a Girl”, New York Times:
      Ms. Poehler is especially good at impersonating powerful women like Senator Clinton (“I like her quiet fury,” she said), but she also has a soft spot for precocious children like the actress Dakota Fanning and an overstimulated preteenager named Kaitlin, a character she created with Emily Spivey, a writer on the show.
      add
  78. racialized
    • 2007 March 18, “‘Medical Apartheid’”, New York Times:
      Despite Emanuel’s bewildering claim to the contrary, the “Black Stork” chapter does focus heavily upon medical research, including racialized studies that fueled involuntary sterilizations, Norplant and Depo-Provera investigations, research distortions that created the myth of the “crack baby,” and nonconsensual research with pregnant black South Carolina women.
      add
  79. ragtops
    • 2007 March 18, Lawrence Ulrich, “There’s More Than Meets the Eye”, New York Times:
      The new deluxe Sidewalk convertibles can reach $40,000, though the 2007 ragtops are still based on the last-generation car.
      add
  80. redenominating
    • 2007 March 18, Simon Romero, “Venezuela to Give Currency New Name and Numbers”, New York Times:
      Officials blame “hoarders” for shortages of basic goods and price increases for food on the black market. Mr. Chávez says the renaming and redenominating the currency will instill confidence in it.
      add
  81. renin
    • 2007 March 18, Lisa Sanders, M.D., “Feeling the Pressure”, New York Times:
      The most striking feature in this patient’s case was a remarkably high level of renin, a chemical made by the kidney to increase blood pressure.
      add
  82. repolish
    • 2007 March 18, Anne Eisenberg, “How to Soften the Edges of Technology”, New York Times:
      Depending on how complicated the job is, the company may have the owner mail the computer in so that Suissa can install the upgrade and repolish the cabinet.
      add
  83. retouchings
    • 2007 March 18, Bernard Holland, “Schumann Retouched, Mendelssohn Revisited”, New York Times:
      Mahler, for one, felt no shame in “improving” Schumann’s Second and Fourth Symphonies, and his retouchings come to us from Riccardo Chailly and the Leipzig Gewandhaus Orchestra.
      add
  84. rosti
    • 2007 March 18, Stacie Stukin, “The Art of Feeding”, New York Times:
      Life is Meatloaf: From left, George Meyer, Maria Semple, Lorenzo Semple Jr. and Kay and James Salter enjoy polpettone alla Toscana and rosti while Poppy Meyer waits for dessert.
      add
  85. savantish
    • 2007 March 18, Bob Shacochis, “Headline News”, New York Times:
      The savantish 11-year-old interjects naïve, untested idealism; the landlord provides the rapacious entrepreneurial spirit that vacuums capitalism clean of conscience.
      add
  86. screwcapped
    • 2007 March 18, Howard G. Goldberg, “German Grapes From Two Eras”, New York Times:
      The screwcapped 2005 Dornfelder from Winzerverein Deidesheim, in the Pfalz, is luscious.
      add
  87. semierect
    • 2007 March 18, Mary Roach, “Girls Will Be Boys”, New York Times:
      With Dillon’s help, Roberta Cowell could become Dillon’s modest fantasy: a woman to whom he could reveal his secret (“a semierect, mostly numb sexual organ that resembled a small party balloon”), and who might have him anyway.
      add
  88. seminomadic
    • 2007 March 18, David Lague, “Chinese Village Struggles to Save Dying Language”, New York Times:
      Descendants of seminomadic tribesmen who conquered China in the 17th century, they are the last living link to a language that for more than two and a half centuries was the official voice of the Qing dynasty, the final imperial house to rule from Beijing and one of the richest and most powerful empires the world has known.
      add
  89. shorefront
    • 2007 March 18, Kristina Shevory, “Texans Find Their Own Hamptons Equivalent”, New York Times:
      A small trailer with a sign out front was advertising Beachtown, a New Urbanist community of pastel-colored shorefront homes.
      add
  90. smuttily
    • 2007 March 18, Jonathan Miles, “Welcome to the Club”, New York Times:
      Like baby names, cocktail names are steered by trends: the smuttily named drinks of the ’70s and ’80s — “two Buttery Nipples, please” — led to the “-tini” phase, which spiraled out of control in the late ’90s and hit bottom with the Apple Pie-tini.
      add
  91. snakeskin
    • 2007 March 18, Winter Miller, “Personal Sound Effects”, New York Times:
      There is no denying Mira Nair could charm the skin off a snake and then sell snakeskin boots back to the snake.
      add
  92. stagings
    • 2007 March 18, Bob Shacochis, “Headline News”, New York Times:
      There have been no new terrorist attacks upon the homeland, although extravagant stagings of emergency and disaster drills, spiffed up with actors like Tad, are disruptively common.
      add
  93. staredown
    • 2007 March 18, Viv Bernstein, “Georgetown Outmuscles Its Former Big East Foe”, New York Times:
      It remained tight until the end, complete with a staredown between Dudley and Georgetown’s Jessie Sapp that led to technical fouls on each side with 6:23 to go.
      add
  94. subfertile
    • 2007 March 18, Alexandra Jacobs, “Hope Springs Maternal”, New York Times:
      The rest of the book describes Orenstein’s rapid descent into the surreal community of the subfertile, a place where normal social rules don’t apply.
      add
  95. subregionals
  96. suzani
    • 2007 March 18, Winter Miller, “Personal Sound Effects”, New York Times:
      She wore a coat made of old cloth from Uzbekistan called a suzani, which was faded black with embroidered red circles and yellow and white zigzags.
      add
  97. swimmable
    • 2007 March 18, Alex Matthiessen, Andy Willner And Terry Backer, “Pipe Dreams”, New York Times:
      Striving for a fishable and swimmable harbor, on the other hand, would be a far more meaningful goal, and one that every New Yorker could benefit from.
      add
  98. tastemaking
    • 2007 March 18, A. O. Scott, “The Shape of Cinema, Transformed at the Click of a Mouse”, New York Times:
      It has become something of a truism that Web culture is driven not by traditional, top-down forms of tastemaking like the judgments of professional critics or the strategies of corporate marketers, but rather by the lateral operations of social networks.
      add
  99. tentlike
  100. traif
    • 2007 March 18, Randy Cohen, “Tuition Trick”, New York Times:
      Recently my wife caught me using the pot for my traif soup.
      add
  101. twisties
    • 2007 March 18, Lawrence Ulrich, “There’s More Than Meets the Eye”, New York Times:
      (On lonely twisties in upstate New York, the driver of a Porsche Boxster S surely found my unshakable Mini anything but cute.)
      add
  102. underimagined
    • 2007 March 18, Bob Shacochis, “Headline News”, New York Times:
      An overly familiar America, accurately portrayed and perforce underimagined.
      add
  103. undistributed
  104. unsellable
  105. unyouthful
    • 2007 March 18, David Kamp, “With the Band”, New York Times:
      And with sly humor, rather than the acrid cynicism that usually characterizes showbiz satire, Lethem follows through with the immediate consequence of such a magical moment: “When no one was looking, the lip of the stage had been approached by men of guile and influence, unyouthful men in youthful clothes.”
      add
  106. vesicovaginal
    • 2007 March 18, “‘Medical Apartheid’”, New York Times:
      For example, researchers’ own statements reveal that the experimental development of gynecologic surgeries like Caesarian section, vesicovaginal fistula repair and ovariotomy were perfected almost exclusively using enslaved black women.
      add
  107. wallcovering
    • 2007 March 18, Stephen P. Williams, “Two Veterans of Bad Old Days in Brooklyn”, New York Times:
      There are flea-market finds and antiques and shelves to hold the 3,000 LPs, 400 45s and 4,000 CDs that Mr. Solomita uses for his occasional work as a D.J. The kitchen is old, with basic cabinets, and the ground-floor bathroom has classic Pepto-Bismol pink tiles trimmed with black, and an exceedingly replaceable old floral wallcovering.
      add
  108. watercooler
    • 2007 March 18, James Poniewozik, “Pink Slip Blues”, New York Times:
      The novel is largely told through watercooler tales — Ferris’s ad-people are big talkers, from nerves, boredom and professional training — and through them, “we” gradually refracts into individual voices.
      add
  109. waterkeepers
    • 2007 March 18, Alex Matthiessen, Andy Willner And Terry Backer, “Pipe Dreams”, New York Times:
      Alex Matthiessen, the Hudson Riverkeeper; Andy Willner, the New York-New Jersey Baykeeper; and Terry Backer, the Long Island Soundkeeper; are founders of the Waterkeeper Alliance, a global network of 160 waterkeepers.
      add
  110. wedgy
    • 2007 March 18, Rob Sass, “End of a Breed”, New York Times:
      THE ADS SAID The wedgy Triumph was lauded as having “the shape of things to come.”
      add

Sequestered[edit]

  1. adaptavists = adaptivists
    • 2007 March 18, “Letters”, New York Times:
      The claims of both the adaptavists and the by-product adherents are beliefs, incapable of determination through application of the scientific method or by the presentation of empirical evidence.
      add
  2. aps = apps
    • 2007 March 18, Alex Williams, “The Future President, on Your Friends List”, New York Times:
      Or, in tech language, such sites aspire to be the killer aps of this election cycle, reminiscent of what talk radio (particularly Rush Limbaugh ) was in 1994, when it whipped up enthusiasm for the Republican landslide in the midterm elections, or what MoveOn.org was in 2004 when it emerged as a potent force to raise funds and drum up volunteers for the Democratic Party.
      add
  3. cyberflotsam
    • 2007 March 18, Bob Shacochis, “Headline News”, New York Times:
      One begins to wonder, as I believe the author intends us to, if the contemporary moment is not “better” delivered by the news cycle and the unceasing slosh of cyberflotsam and citizen-journalists with videophones than by literature.
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  4. heligimble
    • 2007 March 18, Michael Slenske, “All Creatures Great, Small ... and Endangered”, New York Times:
      Among the various photography systems employed by his vagabonding camera crew — 70 men and women who traveled to more than 200 locations on five continents — during their five years traveling the globe, the Cineflex heligimble was by far the most revolutionary.
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  5. soliders = soldiers
    • 2007 March 18, Jennifer Conlin, “Laos Sees Possibility of Tourism in Caves Used During the ‘Secret War’”, New York Times:
      The five caves, in the Viengxay district in the Houaphanh province, one of the poorest sections in the country, are part of a network of 480 caves that were transformed into shops, schools, theaters and government offices for the Pathet Lao Army between 1964 and 1973, when it was fighting against Hmong soliders backed by the C.I.A.
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