User:Visviva/NYT 20070325

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This is a list of lowercase non-hyphenated single words found in the 2007-03-25 issue of the New York Times which did not have English entries in the English Wiktionary when this list was created (2009-02-02).

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170742 tokens ‧ 126601 valid lowercase tokens ‧ 13035 types ‧ 104 (~ 0.798%) words before cleaning ‧ 

2007-03-25[edit]

  1. antifur
    • 2007 March 25, David Colman, “A Blessing in Disguise”, New York Times:
      In the fall of 2003, the priestly ensemble, paired with reading glasses, made a perfect disguise to infiltrate Gianfranco Ferré’s fashion show in Milan. Mr. Mathews said that after security guards dragged him and his antifur sign off the runway, women in the front row “got up and started hitting them and saying, ‘Leave the priest alone!’ ”
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  2. bisteeya
    • 2007 March 25, Amanda Hesser, “1966: David Eyre’s Pancake”, New York Times:
      Smitten with the pancake’s crisp, puffy and eggy qualities, she decided to play around with the idea of crossing a popover (puffy, eggy) with the Moroccan squab pie bisteeya (crisp).
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  3. bowlegged
    • 2007 March 25, T. J. Stiles, “Wanted: The Real Kid”, New York Times:
      Violence swept the high plains, dry valleys and hard mountains — a bowlegged landscape, rugged and broken, populated by warring factions of Hispanic herders, Anglo ranchers and Apaches.
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  4. bullpup
    • 2007 March 25, Patton Oswalt, “Guns and Yoga”, New York Times:
      And yoga never aligns you with the universe better than when your forearm is still tingling from the buck and recoil of a .357 bullpup.
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  5. captainlike
    • 2007 March 25, Vincent M. Mallozzi, “Author Says Yankees Are Missing Something”, New York Times:
      “Chance is arguing balls and strikes and other captainlike issues, including the legality of a pitcher’s motion,” Rosenberg said.
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  6. cartful
  7. cavelike
    • 2007 March 25, Sarah Shey, “Her Ride to Nowhere”, New York Times:
      My son and I got to escape our cavelike apartment.
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  8. caviling
    • 2007 March 25, Michael Chabon, “‘Gentlemen of the Road’”, New York Times:
      Now there would again be nine in their party, a situation intolerable to an observant Jew, particularly with evening coming on, though Joseph would hardly miss the Venetian’s caviling or tendency to whistle tuneless tunes all day and night, even in his sleep.
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  9. chipperness
    • 2007 March 25, Liesl Schillinger, “What I’d Be Without You”, New York Times:
      Anna awakens in a funk most days, and her mother’s chipperness only deepens it.
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  10. clammers
  11. coolheaded
  12. crescentic
    • 2007 March 25, Alex Kuczynski, “Sweet Chastity”, New York Times:
      In ancient Rome, the vestal virgin priestesses were required to keep their hymens — whether annular or crescentic — intact during their 30 years of service.
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  13. customizers
    • 2007 March 25, Michael Fitzgerald, “How to Improve It? Ask Those Who Use It”, New York Times:
      One of his favorite examples comes from the title article in Tom Wolfe’s 1965 book, “The Kandy-Kolored Tangerine-Flake Streamline Baby,” which chronicled car customizers whose innovations — tailfins, double headlights, low-slung bodies — were later adopted by Detroit. Mr. Griffith says that even now, millions of people modify their cars, far more people than the world’s automakers could ever employ in research and development.
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  14. cyberintelligence
  15. decoupaged
    • 2007 March 25, Lola Ogunnaike, “Abracadabra: Lifting the Lid Off the Box”, New York Times:
      Lips slathered in bright red lipstick, body covered in tattoos, his physique is as worthy of note as the club’s elaborate theatrics (marionettes having sex, a troupe of samurai drummers, a transexual porn star, Buck Angel, displaying his wares) and shabby chic décor (red velvet and white lace curtains, decoupaged wallpaper featuring Babar and other less innocent scenes).
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  16. downcourt
    • 2007 March 25, The Associated Press, “Buzzer-Beater Ends Winona St. Reign”, New York Times:
      Bobby Buffaloe then made a steal, tipping the ball away from Malvik right to Atkinson, who raced downcourt and scored the winning basket just before time expired.
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  17. dropseed
  18. ecoconscious
    • 2007 March 25, Brendan I. Koerner, “Curl Up and Transcend”, New York Times:
      Over the years, he replaced the vessel’s metal base with a layer of foam to enhance the sound; he also moved the satellite speakers to the Transport’s bottom, alongside the L.E.D.’s. In a nod to what he expects will be an ecoconscious market for the pod, he switched construction adhesives, from a petroleum-based resin to one made from soybeans.
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  19. elegiacally
    • 2007 March 25, Liesl Schillinger, “The Evolution of a City, in Words and Pictures”, New York Times:
      Their camera rests elegiacally on two Hopperesque receptionists at the hipster hot spot, the Hotel on Rivington on the Lower East Side, but mostly, their pictures are literal, more evidence than art.
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  20. flipbook
    • 2007 March 25, Liesl Schillinger, “The Evolution of a City, in Words and Pictures”, New York Times:
      Their book, which includes a gushing stream-of-consciousness introduction by the novelist and poet Harry Mathews, is a flipbook of the multitextured visual reality of this town.
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  21. footages
    • 2007 March 25, Vivian S. Toy, “The Danger in the Fine Print”, New York Times:
      As is customary in New York City , these gross square footages exceed the usable floor area of each unit.”
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  22. frouffy
    • 2007 March 25, Jennifer Tung, “The Polished Traveler”, New York Times:
      “I tend to be tailored, clean and not particularly frouffy.
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  23. groundfishermen
    • 2007 March 25, Katie Zezima, “In Maine, Trying to Protect an Old Way of Life”, New York Times:
      The site holds a wharf for groundfishermen to unload and sell their catch, a restaurant, the neighborhood’s shuttered general store where residents once met for coffee each morning, and two small apartments.
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  24. groundfishing
    • 2007 March 25, Katie Zezima, “In Maine, Trying to Protect an Old Way of Life”, New York Times:
      Kim Libby, whose family has worked the waters here for generations, said they had taken a huge financial hit because of regulations limiting groundfishing days.
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  25. heroisms
    • 2007 March 25, Rob Nixon, “African, American”, New York Times:
      As Stephanos wanders, Bloom-like, down back streets and broad avenues, he takes in both the neglected statuary that attempts to do the official work of remembrance and the anonymous heroisms of ordinary people, unnoticed by anyone but a neighbor or a storekeeper or a child.
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  26. hyperextended
    • 2007 March 25, Gia Kourlas, “Paul Taylor’s Women Take a Leap Forward”, New York Times:
      Her one discernible flaw is her hyperextended arms, but while occasionally distracting, they also lend her elegance a youthful, gangly charm.
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  27. impermissibility
    • 2007 March 25, Michael Chabon, “‘Gentlemen of the Road’”, New York Times:
      Chapter 9: On anxieties arising from the impermissibility, however unreasonable, of an elephant's rounding out a prayer quorum.
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  28. instrumentarium
    • 2007 March 25, Michelle Dulak Thomson, “Early Instruments in Tough New Settings”, New York Times:
      Even the outré instrumentarium of the Swiss composer Nadir Vessena’s “Bagatelle Trascendentali” (violin, viola d’amore, viola da gamba, two cellos, bass, lute and harpsichord) is used with almost perverse restraint.
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  29. interleague
    • 2007 March 25, Alan Schwarz, “In Baseball, Searching for Balance in the Scheduling Vortex”, New York Times:
      And even though the Dodgers have not been to Yankee Stadium since the 1981 World Series, their interleague schedule includes two series against Toronto, in part because the Yankees and the Dodgers, by virtue of sharing markets with the Mets and the Angels, have the same home-road pattern and never match up.
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  30. kyats
  31. landmarked
    • 2007 March 25, Jeff Vandam, “Preservationists’ Rallying Cry”, New York Times:
      “Permitted demolition or stripping rarely occurs on landmarked buildings,” she said. Ms. de Bourbon also noted that the city already requires the Buildings Department to hold permits for 40 days for “calendared” properties — those currently under landmarks consideration — so the commission has a chance to designate them.
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  32. liriope
    • 2007 March 25, Emily Brady, “Snipping a Vine and Sowing Dismay”, New York Times:
      They have both been avid gardeners for years, tending the two small beds surrounding the honey locust trees outside their apartment house on East 79th Street near Second Avenue, where neighbors often stop in summer to admire the lushness of the Japanese lilies and the lavender spires of the liriope.
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  33. marshside
  34. mediacrities
    • 2007 March 25, William Safire, “Go Figure”, New York Times:
      Thus, amid the elitist Language Snobs and the anarchic Language Slobs, among mediacrities and hip-hopocratic jargonauts shooting the Utubes and pretending to be Serius, there stands the fastest-growing crowd of all: un-self-aware writers and speakers, lovers of the language fascinated by its roots and user-judges of its flowering.
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  35. mellifluent
    • 2007 March 25, Marilyn Stasio, “Touch of Evil”, New York Times:
      A Mo Hayder novel makes a nice palate cleanser when you’ve binged on too many mellifluent literary mysteries and don’t feel like shooting it out with yet another wise-racking private eye.
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  36. memoirish
  37. meyhane
    • 2007 March 25, “Charming Menus Hang On”, New York Times:
      There are many enticing meze offerings at this Turkish meyhane (literally, “wine house”).
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  38. microneighborhoods
  39. minitours
  40. misdemeanants
    • 2007 March 25, Michael Powell, “A Better Society? Or a Better Résumé?”, New York Times:
      Conceived as a selfless contribution toward building a civil society, community service can sometimes seem perilously close to compulsory drudgery, a way for misdemeanants to avoid the clink, for corporations to market a brand, and for ambitious high school students to polish résumés.
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  41. misrouted
  42. moonlike
    • 2007 March 25, Michael Kimmelman, “The Event and the Image, Fused by the Viewfinder”, New York Times:
      Mute, bloodless scenes of moonlike panoramas, to the people back in Britain and France who saw them they no doubt looked alien, like the new medium that produced them.
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  43. multicables
  44. multicasting
  45. multipathing
    • 2007 March 25, John R. Quain, “A Listener’s Take”, New York Times:
      But WNEW-FM’s HD broadcast sounded clear and clean, with ringing guitars and without the fading or signal interference known as multipathing.
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  46. multitextured
    • 2007 March 25, Liesl Schillinger, “The Evolution of a City, in Words and Pictures”, New York Times:
      Their book, which includes a gushing stream-of-consciousness introduction by the novelist and poet Harry Mathews, is a flipbook of the multitextured visual reality of this town.
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  47. multitracks
    • 2007 March 25, Ben Ratliff, “Vintage Sounds From the Sahara and Points South”, New York Times:
      She multitracks her voice, building large choral swarms, and the band expands lavishly on the rhythm and harmonies of the original songs, which in some cases were stirring but fairly simple.
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  48. nonarresting
    • 2007 March 25, Randy Cohen, “Police Report”, New York Times:
      The cronyism of the nonarresting officers is also wrong.
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  49. nondestination
    • 2007 March 25, Sarah Shey, “Her Ride to Nowhere”, New York Times:
      Our nondestination of choice was the Brooklyn Bridge.
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  50. nongolfers
    • 2007 March 25, Antoinette Martin, “Home Turf”, New York Times:
      At Crystal Springs, lavish new amenities are continuously being added to attract nongolfers, and to entertain golfers during New Jersey’s off-season for golf, said Andrew Mulvihill, who heads development there.
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  51. nonlive
  52. nonpermanent
    • 2007 March 25, Thom Shanker, “Security Council Votes to Tighten Iran Sanctions”, New York Times:
      In order to assure a unanimous vote that would symbolize united world opinion against Iran’s nuclear ambitions, lengthy negotiations continued through Friday on a series of amendments from three of the Security Council’s nonpermanent members, South Africa, Indonesia and Qatar.
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  53. nonrich
    • 2007 March 25, Tina Rosenberg, “Reverse Foreign Aid”, New York Times:
      Since 1990, the world’s nonrich nations have increased their reserves, on average, from around three months’ worth of imports to more than eight months’ worth — or the equivalent of about 30 percent of their G.D.P. China and other countries maintain those reserves mainly in the form of supersecure U.S. Treasury bills; whenever they buy T-bills, they are in effect lending the United States money.
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  54. nonrigged
    • 2007 March 25, Ben Stein, “The Split-Screen State of the Union”, New York Times:
      The company and the ordinary stockholders were thus cheated, defrauded, “inside traded” out of the difference between the rigged price and what the nonrigged price would have been.
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  55. oddsmakers
  56. outhandle
  57. outmuscling
    • 2007 March 25, Reuters, “Bresciano on Offensive in Victory for Australia”, New York Times:
      Both goals came in the opening 30 minutes as Australia, without a handful of its top players, made a good start to preparations for its Asian Cup debut by outmuscling China with a dominant first half.
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  58. oversubscribed
    • 2007 March 25, Bob Morris, “The Badder Good”, New York Times:
      It is also totally oversubscribed.
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  59. pimentoed
    • 2007 March 25, Michael Chabon, “‘Gentlemen of the Road’”, New York Times:
      A plume of dust half a mile tall moved against the southern sky, slow and menacing, a quill scribing oaths of rebellion along the shores of the Khazar Sea. The reports he had received, discounted by half for lies and bluster and by two-thirds for wishfulness, portrayed the rebels as a tough shank of perhaps 500 Arsiyah horsemen seething in a thin broth of Muhammadan irregulars and pimentoed with a fistful of Nestorians, pagans, worshipers of fire and Jews who wished for or foresaw the downfall of Buljan.
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  60. pluralistically
    • 2007 March 25, William Safire, “Go Figure”, New York Times:
      The Language Mavenhood is becoming less pluralistically ignorant.
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  61. postproduction
    • 2007 March 25, Sylviane Gold, “A Director Comfortable With Catastrophe”, New York Times:
      In New York to edit her first English-language movie, “Things We Lost in the Fire,” she’s taking a break near the Midtown postproduction facility where she has been poring over freeze frames of Halle Berry and Benicio Del Toro in yet another story of family disruption and pain.
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  62. postround
  63. prebiblical
    • 2007 March 25, Jonathan Rosen, “Lost and Found”, New York Times:
      “Gilgamesh,” the oldest work of great literature we have, sprang back to life, surrounded by the shards of a prebiblical culture that challenged assumptions about the primacy of biblical authority, a concept already crumbling fast in Victorian England.
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  64. preferreds
    • 2007 March 25, J. Alex Tarquinio, “Don’t Mind That Misnomer: It’s Got Yield”, New York Times:
      “These are good for the income-oriented investor who is trying to maximize yield without having to buy noninvestment-grade bonds,” said Kevin J. Conery, a fixed-income strategist at Merrill Lynch who specializes in preferreds.
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  65. preteenage
  66. psychoanalyzing
  67. quayside
    • 2007 March 25, Stephen Metcalf, “Into the Mystical Unreal Reality of the Faroe Islands”, New York Times:
      I, in fact, look not only like an American and a tourist, but also like an idiot, having walked up onto the quayside at Nolsoy, through its most famous landmark — the bone archway formed by the massive jaws of a sperm whale — and into its one bar wearing a flotation suit.
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  68. recomposition
    • 2007 March 25, Michael Kimmelman, “The Event and the Image, Fused by the Viewfinder”, New York Times:
      The chief organizer, Michel Poivert, in an accompanying brochure, says that certain events recorded by photographs have the “capacity to shatter the intelligibility of the world and to impose a recomposition based on the new elements within that disruption.”
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  69. riad
    • 2007 March 25, Jennifer Conlin, “A Bounty of Events for Flower Lovers”, New York Times:
      Guests can also prepare a lunch with a chef at the Palmeraie gardens, visit a souk, enjoy drinks at the Matisse Art Gallery, and stay in a boutique riad owned by an Italian Prince.
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  70. rollaway
    • 2007 March 25, Coco Myers, “Finding a Stylish Hotel Even Kids Will Enjoy”, New York Times:
      Take, for example, Amangani near Jackson, Wyo. This luxury resort offers spacious accommodations — (4 of the 40 suites, which start at $565 (plus $100 for a rollaway bed), have one and a half baths and sleep up to five.
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  71. rumrunners
    • 2007 March 25, Emily Brady, “Last Call?”, New York Times:
      As family lore has it, during Prohibition the place was a speakeasy, supplied with liquor by rumrunners who rowed their contraband across Kill Van Kull from Bayonne.
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  72. semidetached
  73. semifeudal
    • 2007 March 25, Lydia Polgreen, “Diamonds Move From Blood to Sweat and Tears”, New York Times:
      At the losing end are the miners here in Kono District, who work for little or no pay, hoping to strike it rich but caught in a net of semifeudal relationships that make it all but impossible that they ever will.
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  74. skaterly
    • 2007 March 25, Gia Kourlas, “Paul Taylor’s Women Take a Leap Forward”, New York Times:
      In Mr. Taylor’s “Airs” she performed the difficult adagio solo, demonstrating her fluid ability to dance with ease and lightness without sacrificing the necessary weight. Ms. Halzack maintains the same softness and control, whether balanced on one leg or skimming the surface of the stage in swift, skaterly runs.
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  75. slingshotted
    • 2007 March 25, Dwight Garner, “Inside the List”, New York Times:
      And surely this spring-loaded line from early in “A Heartbreaking Work of Staggering Genius” — a line that puts me in mind of Jack Kerouac ’s riff about those that burn like fabulous roman candles — in which Dave Eggers writes about himself and his younger brother: “Look at us, goddammit, the two of us slingshotted from the back side of the moon, greedily cartwheeling toward everything we are owed.”
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  76. sparklingly
    • 2007 March 25, Gia Kourlas, “Paul Taylor’s Women Take a Leap Forward”, New York Times:
      The trust and spirit, which Mr. Taylor has described as “what the audience sees besides the steps,” is sparklingly intact.
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  77. stuttery
    • 2007 March 25, Caryn James, “Out on the Tightrope, Where Comics Try Acting”, New York Times:
      (You can’t blame Mr. Ferrell for his part in Woody Allen ’s “Melinda and Melinda,” in which he goes the way of many actors before him and morphs into a stuttery Woody substitute.)
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  78. styrofoam
    • 2007 March 25, Rob Nixon, “African, American”, New York Times:
      This band of brothers likes to gather after hours in the back of Stephanos’s store, where they down Johnnie Walker Black from styrofoam cups and play their memory game: name an African dictator, then recall the country and the year he seized power.
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  79. supercops
    • 2007 March 25, Dave Kehr, “Shadows of Watts, in the Light”, New York Times:
      There are no supercops or superpimps in Mr. Burnett’s Watts, the neighborhood he has lived in (or near) since his family moved to Los Angeles from Vicksburg, Miss., when he was a child.
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  80. superpimps
    • 2007 March 25, Dave Kehr, “Shadows of Watts, in the Light”, New York Times:
      There are no supercops or superpimps in Mr. Burnett’s Watts, the neighborhood he has lived in (or near) since his family moved to Los Angeles from Vicksburg, Miss., when he was a child.
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  81. swoony
    • 2007 March 25, Erica Wagner, “Call Me, Ishmael”, New York Times:
      And so Heathcliff lopes away into the storm-wracked night without hearing the rest of her speech (“he shall never know how I love him”), and readers are denied the swoony bliss of true romance.
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  82. unintimidated
  83. unwontedly
    • 2007 March 25, Erica Wagner, “Call Me, Ishmael”, New York Times:
      She was, to her greatest relief, able to reach him who had so unwontedly overheard her incautious remarks, for Mr. Heathcliff, despite his sometimes rough manner, was never without his cell.
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  84. upthrusted
    • 2007 March 25, Stephen Metcalf, “Into the Mystical Unreal Reality of the Faroe Islands”, New York Times:
      The Faroe Islands are an archipelago of 18 upthrusted hunks of igneous rock in the middle of precisely nowhere, the stretch of North Atlantic halfway between Norway and Iceland .
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  85. vanful
    • 2007 March 25, Jesse Green, “Theater’s Alive With the Sound of Laptops”, New York Times:
      For one thing, they are cheaper and more compact than older systems, which required a vanful of equipment and a dedicated tech nerd and cost thousands of dollars a week to rent.
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  86. videocam
    • 2007 March 25, Marilyn Stasio, “Touch of Evil”, New York Times:
      Oakes prides himself on being “a natural skeptic, a full-blownnonbeliever,” too savvyto acknowledge theexistence of a freakishman-beast with a fleshytail dangling fromits spine, caught on a tourist’s videocam.
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  87. whanging
  88. wishfulness
    • 2007 March 25, Michael Chabon, “‘Gentlemen of the Road’”, New York Times:
      A plume of dust half a mile tall moved against the southern sky, slow and menacing, a quill scribing oaths of rebellion along the shores of the Khazar Sea. The reports he had received, discounted by half for lies and bluster and by two-thirds for wishfulness, portrayed the rebels as a tough shank of perhaps 500 Arsiyah horsemen seething in a thin broth of Muhammadan irregulars and pimentoed with a fistful of Nestorians, pagans, worshipers of fire and Jews who wished for or foresaw the downfall of Buljan.
      add

Sequestered[edit]

  1. gastropodionado