User:Visviva/NYT 20070402

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This is a list of lowercase non-hyphenated single words found in the 2007-04-02 issue of the New York Times which did not have English entries in the English Wiktionary when this list was created (2009-02-04).

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74778 tokens ‧ 54843 valid lowercase tokens ‧ 7922 types ‧ 28 (~ 0.353%) words before cleaning ‧ 

2007-04-02[edit]

  1. antidumping
  2. aphasias
    • 2007 April 2, “Confronting Early-Stage Alzheimer’s (4 Letters)”, New York Times:
      I have found that helping patients suffering from all the dementias and those with aphasias pinpoint what they are feeling (often by intuiting and articulating the feelings for them or by helping them understand more clearly what they are trying to say as only an analytically oriented therapist can) relieves them and helps them maintain a sense of the “I.”
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  3. aquadynamic
    • 2007 April 2, Christopher Clarey, “Phelps Matches Spitz With Seventh Gold Medal”, New York Times:
      The only parts of his body that do not look aquadynamic are his protruding ears, but the rest of it undulates through the water at a historic clip, and he made plenty of swimming history here.
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  4. balafon
    • 2007 April 2, Jon Pareles, “A Musical Coalition That Raises the Roof”, New York Times:
      Its music rides on the intricacies of West African rhythm — shifting, multilayered three-against-two syncopations — and on galvanizing dynamics that called for a dance floor rather than Zankel Hall. Mr. Diabate on kora, Fode Lassana Diabate on balafon and Fanta Mady Kouyate on electric guitar traded lines at hyperspeed in startling buildups, and the singers worked up to the rapid, oratorical flourishes of djeli singing, sometimes getting on their knees to praise Mr. Diabate and call for more kora.
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  5. banjolike
    • 2007 April 2, Jon Pareles, “A Musical Coalition That Raises the Roof”, New York Times:
      The lyrics were in several West African languages, and the lineup paired African instruments — the kora (the djelis’ 21-string harp-lute), the xylophonelike balafon, the small banjolike ngoni and the booming djembe (hand drum) — with modern counterparts: electric guitar, bass, keyboard and trap drums.
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  6. clangings
    • 2007 April 2, “Arts, Briefly”, New York Times:
      Before long the noises had become rumblings and clangings.
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  7. djeli
    • 2007 April 2, Jon Pareles, “A Musical Coalition That Raises the Roof”, New York Times:
      Its music rides on the intricacies of West African rhythm — shifting, multilayered three-against-two syncopations — and on galvanizing dynamics that called for a dance floor rather than Zankel Hall. Mr. Diabate on kora, Fode Lassana Diabate on balafon and Fanta Mady Kouyate on electric guitar traded lines at hyperspeed in startling buildups, and the singers worked up to the rapid, oratorical flourishes of djeli singing, sometimes getting on their knees to praise Mr. Diabate and call for more kora.
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  8. hitless
    • 2007 April 2, Ben Shpigel, “Karma and Scoreboard Favor Mets in Their Opener”, New York Times:
      They turned four double plays, held Albert Pujols and Scott Rolen hitless, and mashed the Cardinals’ ace, Chris Carpenter, for five runs — all with two outs — and nine hits in six innings.
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  9. hyperspeed
    • 2007 April 2, Jon Pareles, “A Musical Coalition That Raises the Roof”, New York Times:
      Its music rides on the intricacies of West African rhythm — shifting, multilayered three-against-two syncopations — and on galvanizing dynamics that called for a dance floor rather than Zankel Hall. Mr. Diabate on kora, Fode Lassana Diabate on balafon and Fanta Mady Kouyate on electric guitar traded lines at hyperspeed in startling buildups, and the singers worked up to the rapid, oratorical flourishes of djeli singing, sometimes getting on their knees to praise Mr. Diabate and call for more kora.
      add
  10. janjaweed
  11. laverbread
  12. nagara
  13. ngoni
    • 2007 April 2, Jon Pareles, “A Musical Coalition That Raises the Roof”, New York Times:
      The lyrics were in several West African languages, and the lineup paired African instruments — the kora (the djelis’ 21-string harp-lute), the xylophonelike balafon, the small banjolike ngoni and the booming djembe (hand drum) — with modern counterparts: electric guitar, bass, keyboard and trap drums.
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  14. nonmarket
    • 2007 April 2, David Lague, “China Says New U.S. Duty Disrupts Relations”, New York Times:
      Washington had refrained from applying these sanctions on imports from so-called nonmarket economies like China, where it was difficult to calculate the value of government assistance to industry.
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  15. nonstory
    • 2007 April 2, David Carr, “Thousands Are Laid Off at Circuit City. What’s New?”, New York Times:
      “The fact that this was a nonstory is as emblematic of our times as the firings themselves,” said Harley Shaiken, a professor who teaches labor issues at the University of California , Berkeley.
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  16. postpublication
    • 2007 April 2, Julie Bosman, “Pushing a New Writer Upstream”, New York Times:
      Unlike the postpublication book tour, which focuses on publicity and public appearances, the pre-publication tour is meant to win the hearts of the front-line soldiers in the bookselling trenches, and more and more publishers are finding it an indispensable part of their marketing plan.
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  17. printlike
    • 2007 April 2, Virginia Heffernan, “The Onion Speaks, and Sounds Familiar”, New York Times:
      That printlike ad doesn’t flash or squeal “Click me,” but you can, and you get some pro forma rigmaroles about being old enough to drink, and thus to enter the Dewar’s site.
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  18. pungi *
    • 2007 April 2, Jennifer Dunning, “Snakelike Charms From the Indian Desert”, New York Times:
      Bhawroo Khan Langa nearly stole the show in extroverted solos on the wooden blocks, and Sarwan Nath, the small, stooping pungi (double clarinet) soloist, was clearly a closet dancer.
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  19. rotelli
    • 2007 April 2, “Dear Diary”, New York Times:
      Sashimi, linguine, rotelli, cassoulet,
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  20. schmeared
    • 2007 April 2, Susan Stewart, “One Man’s Biodiversity Is Another Man’s Lunch”, New York Times:
      In Madrid he dined on suckling pig, cutting his lip as he sucked out the brain, and praising the eyes: “wonderful, especially schmeared on a little bit of bread.”
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  21. semistaging
    • 2007 April 2, Allan Kozinn, “Young Voices, Freshly Plucked From a French Garden”, New York Times:
      Les Arts Florissants played with its customary verve, and Elsa Rooke’s semistaging — a lot of slow-motion ambling and posing, hand gestures and a bit of kneeling and shoe throwing — was better than the usual stand-and-sing approach, when it didn’t distract from both the music and the singers.
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  22. situps
  23. stadiumgoers
  24. unslaked
  25. unsleek
    • 2007 April 2, Virginia Heffernan, “The Onion Speaks, and Sounds Familiar”, New York Times:
      Photographs of the unsleek, inland-dwelling and mostly male clique that, with various cast shifts, has developed the Onion sensibility over 20 years, beginning at the University of Wisconsin , reveal a Midwestern chain gang that seems to know exactly what they’re about.
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  26. wicketkeeping
  27. winglets
  28. xylophonelike
    • 2007 April 2, Jon Pareles, “A Musical Coalition That Raises the Roof”, New York Times:
      The lyrics were in several West African languages, and the lineup paired African instruments — the kora (the djelis’ 21-string harp-lute), the xylophonelike balafon, the small banjolike ngoni and the booming djembe (hand drum) — with modern counterparts: electric guitar, bass, keyboard and trap drums.
      add

Sequestered[edit]