User:Visviva/NYT 20070408

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This is a list of lowercase non-hyphenated single words found in the 2007-04-08 issue of the New York Times which did not have English entries in the English Wiktionary when this list was created (2009-02-04).

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188370 tokens ‧ 140856 valid lowercase tokens ‧ 13680 types ‧ 109 (~ 0.797%) words before cleaning ‧ 

2007-04-08[edit]

  1. alfils
    • 2007 April 8, Michael Chabon, “‘Gentlemen of the Road’”, New York Times:
      Buljan reached toward the shatranj board at his right hand, picked up one of the alfils of dark green stone, then set the jade elephant down again.
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  2. artificialities
    • 2007 April 8, Dave Kehr, “Restless Innovations From Alain Resnais”, New York Times:
      The characters suddenly seemed cartoonish, and the actors’ delivery seemed more elocutionary than interpretive. Mr. Resnais had rediscovered the artificialities of the theater and began to use them, as he later said, to create “a movement back and forth between identification and distance, between sympathy and antipathy” for his characters.
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  3. beechwood
    • 2007 April 8, Allen Salkin, “Selling Himself and Prints, Too”, New York Times:
      Mr. Lewis arrived in New York five years ago from West Virginia with little more than some lithographs he had made in college and a few mayonnaise jars of beechwood moonshine.
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  4. bek *
    • 2007 April 8, Michael Chabon, “‘Gentlemen of the Road’”, New York Times:
      Whispers began that a guilty conscience was preventing the new bek from taking up residence in the royal apartments, and even that the ghost of his murdered predecessor in phantom rags had been seen in the donjon’s upper windows.
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  5. beks
    • 2007 April 8, Michael Chabon, “‘Gentlemen of the Road’”, New York Times:
      At the Feast of Booths it was the custom of the beks of Khazaria to pitch their leaf tents in the yard of the prison fortress called Qomr, a mound of yellowish brick rising up from the left bank of the turbid river, in whose donjon by long tradition the warlord was obliged to lay his head.
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  6. bekun
    • 2007 April 8, Michael Chabon, “‘Gentlemen of the Road’”, New York Times:
      Buljan himself perched on the tripod of his office, formed from gilded elks’ antlers, with his bekun beside him nursing his infant and his twins playing in the corner with colored beads and some squirrels’ tails.
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  7. biopharma
    • 2007 April 8, Denise Caruso, “How to Confine the Plants of the Future?”, New York Times:
      But there is some scientific evidence not acknowledged in biopharma risk assessments that casts a dark cloud over this silver lining.
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  8. bisteeya
    • 2007 April 8, “Letters”, New York Times:
      When the recipe for the Moroccan pigeon pie bisteeya came out, it also entered my repertory for entertaining.
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  9. burrata
    • 2007 April 8, Christine Muhlke, “Canned Heat”, New York Times:
      At Pizzeria Mozza, she elevates the humble pie, topping the bubbly crust with fennel-sausage meatballs, whipped cream and fennel pollen; or braised bacon, burrata and escarole.
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  10. campesinos
    • 2007 April 8, Joe Queenan, “Fancy Meeting You Here”, New York Times:
      Returning to Cuba, Fidel Castro ’s right-hand man finds that Sting Guevara is just not gaining any traction with the campesinos, and the legend of Che is born.
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  11. candledust
    • 2007 April 8, William Logan, “The Poet of Exile”, New York Times:
      A powerful maker of phrases from the start, he adopted the English of an empire that, having once painted the map red, was slowly being dismantled: the ruins of a great house, “Whose moth-like girls are mixed with candledust, / Remain to file the lizard’s dragonish claws.
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  12. corporatized
    • 2007 April 8, Deborah Schoeneman, “San Francisco, N.Y.”, New York Times:
      The small club has big ambitions: to bring a slice of New York nightlife to the corporatized Union Square neighborhood.
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  13. crosslegged
    • 2007 April 8, Michael Chabon, “‘Gentlemen of the Road’”, New York Times:
      “The fate of the Khazars appears to have become curiously knit up with the fate of its elephants,” he said to the Radanite agent, who sat on the carpet, crosslegged, under the interlaced rushes of the roof.
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  14. cumbia
    • 2007 April 8, Jon Pareles, “Heartbreak in Suburbia, Exuberance in Colombia”, New York Times:
      Latin rhythms that were fomented in New York, Puerto Rico, Cuba and elsewhere found a welcoming second home in Colombia, where they shared the dance floors with local sounds like the clip-clop beat of the cumbia and the tootling clarinet of the porro.
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  15. customizer
    • 2007 April 8, Jerry Garrett, “A Dozen Don’t-Miss Models at the New York Auto Show”, New York Times:
      The two others are an F-150 pickup reimagined by the customizer Chip Foose and a 540-horsepower King of the Road Mustang, the Shelby GT500KR, finished by the racecar legend Carroll Shelby.
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  16. defensives
  17. demises
    • 2007 April 8, Dennis Lim, “The Year the Pie and Coffee Ran Out”, New York Times:
      Both demises are now inextricably linked: When David Lynch ’s hit series revealed who killed Laura Palmer in the fall of 1990, it also committed a kind of symbolic suicide.
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  18. disjunctions
    • 2007 April 8, A. O. Scott, “Wandering in Weimar Purgatory”, New York Times:
      But these jolts and disjunctions can be thrilling as well as baffling, as Fassbinder and his cast, frequently wrapping up scenes in a single take, veer from the operatic to the naturalistic, from the profane to the lyrical, from the cartoonish to the tragic.
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  19. documentarylike
    • 2007 April 8, Dave Kehr, “Restless Innovations From Alain Resnais”, New York Times:
      Up to this point Mr. Resnais’s films may have had scrambled structures, but they largely adhered to the naturalistic conventions of cinematic storytelling: psychologically rounded characters, a documentarylike fidelity to real-world locations, a desire to bind the viewer to the characters through the psychological process of identification.
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  20. downzoning
    • 2007 April 8, Jeff Vandam, “Thinking Big at a Time Others Are Thinking Small”, New York Times:
      The result is a boroughwide push to use zoning — specifically downzoning — to keep out the tall, bulky multifamily dwellings that seem to be popping up in more and more neighborhoods.
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  21. dragonish
    • 2007 April 8, William Logan, “The Poet of Exile”, New York Times:
      A powerful maker of phrases from the start, he adopted the English of an empire that, having once painted the map red, was slowly being dismantled: the ruins of a great house, “Whose moth-like girls are mixed with candledust, / Remain to file the lizard’s dragonish claws.
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  22. drygulcher
    • 2007 April 8, Joe Queenan, “Fancy Meeting You Here”, New York Times:
      Austen particularly objects to Crockett’s refusal to clean his spittoon, and his persistence in referring to her as a “back-shooting drygulcher — just like that polecat Lizzie Bennett!”
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  23. flopdom
    • 2007 April 8, Charles Isherwood, “Take a Bow, Loser, the Spotlight’s Yours”, New York Times:
      Exhibit A in the case for the country’s new love affair with flopdom would have to be “American Idol,” arguably the most influential showbiz phenomenon of the last decade.
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  24. forecheck
    • 2007 April 8, The Associated Press, “Out of Slovakia, Demitra and Gaborik Bring Power”, New York Times:
      Coach Jacques Lemaire last week implored Demitra and Gaborik — who frequently face top defensemen from other teams — to dump the puck in the corner and follow up with a strong forecheck when necessary, instead of trying difficult, fancy passes through neutral-zone traffic.
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  25. frappuccinos
    • 2007 April 8, Daniel Gross, “Latte Laborers Take on a Latte-Liberal Business”, New York Times:
      “The N.L.R.B.’s complaint illustrates that this is a company with a profound disrespect for workers’ rights,” said Daniel Gross (no relation), a union organizer who dished out frappuccinos and mocha lattes at Starbucks before being fired last August.
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  26. glissandos
    • 2007 April 8, “Fiction Chronicle”, New York Times:
      Less forgivable are Kadare’s overwrought glissandos on Suzana’s nether regions, which he compares to the Arc de Triomphe, a monster growling in the bushes and Albania under Communist rule — “a parched, desiccated estuary dotted about with puny blades of yellowing desert grass,” in case you were wondering.
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  27. gomme *
    • 2007 April 8, Jennifer Conlin, “Gordon Ramsay Spreads His Culinary Tentacles”, New York Times:
      Guests who don’t fancy a pint of beer can always try the pub’s original cocktails—though the Wallpaper (Cachaça, passion fruit, vanilla gomme and a touch of chili) sounds more like what the river just washed up than a tasty cocktail.
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  28. grandmotherhood
    • 2007 April 8, Liesl Schillinger, “Get Out. No, Wait, Come Back!”, New York Times:
      And as Ellen Goodman, a Pulitzer-winning columnist, notes in another chapter, neither does grandmotherhood. Ms. Goodman, the mother of a daughter and a stepdaughter, and grandmother of two, writes, “If there were any more proof needed that care giving does not end, that family continues, it is grandchildren.”
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  29. greenside
  30. groundout
  31. heavyhanded
    • 2007 April 8, Natalie Angier, “Sociable Darwinism”, New York Times:
      The heavyhanded biblical literalism of creationist science evolves into the feints and curlicues of intelligent design, and the casual dismissiveness with which scientists long regarded the anti-evolutionists gives way to a belated awareness that, gee, the public doesn’t seem to realize how fatuous the other side is, and maybe it’s time to combat the creationist phylum head on.
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  32. homecourt
  33. impersonality
    • 2007 April 8, A. O. Scott, “Wandering in Weimar Purgatory”, New York Times:
      The random encounters and abrupt transitions that structure urban life, the sense of numberless human elements swirling through a bounded space, create a feeling of impersonality as well as energy.
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  34. interdimensional
    • 2007 April 8, Dennis Lim, “The Year the Pie and Coffee Ran Out”, New York Times:
      The (literal) chess game between Cooper and his psychotic ex-partner, Windom Earle (Kenneth Welsh), builds toward the Miss Twin Peaks contest and an interdimensional visit to the Red Room, the strobe-lighted site of a cosmic showdown between good and evil — or, in Mr. Lynch’s preferred formulation, between love and fear.
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  35. josh
    • 2007 April 8, Joe Queenan, “Fancy Meeting You Here”, New York Times:
      No, mon ami, I josh not: one man’s anachronism is another man’s tintinnabulation.
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  36. limolike
    • 2007 April 8, Lawrence Ulrich, “Powerfully Mixed Messages at the Show”, New York Times:
      Second-row legroom is indeed limolike, the third row folds flat and an optional rear console houses a refrigerator and freezer.
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  37. maroonish
    • 2007 April 8, Jeff Vandam, “Near the Fast Lane, Rumblings About Noise”, New York Times:
      He also contends that the maroonish hue on the side of the barriers facing the road is not as nice as the lighter red used for the barriers in Nassau County.
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  38. medjool
    • 2007 April 8, Christine Muhlke, “Canned Heat”, New York Times:
      8 large, soft medjool dates, pitted, smashed with the flat side of a knife and finely chopped
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  39. microneighborhoods
    • 2007 April 8, C. J. Hughes, “There’s a History to All This History”, New York Times:
      With its population of 10,000 making up 18 percent of Milford’s total 55,000, Milford Center has several microneighborhoods of historical interest: one in its northern reaches that received historic designation in 1977; a second, in the southeast, on Gulf Street, that some preservationists see as the next worthwhile project; and a third, in the south, given historic designation only last month, with Lafayette, Pond and High Streets as its rough boundaries.
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  40. midcap
  41. misimpressions
    • 2007 April 8, “About the Series”, New York Times:
      Patients go home with the wrong drugs or the wrong doses or misimpressions about the importance of taking their medications.
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  42. mostarda *
    • 2007 April 8, Thomas Vinciguerra, “Mrs. Wiseguy”, New York Times:
      Ms. Buono addressed the last of fennel-glazed duck with spicy chard, Vidalia onion and grape mostarda.
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  43. multicore
    • 2007 April 8, Rob Walker, “Not Necessarily Toast”, New York Times:
      “Heated bread lacks the high-tech cachet of multicore processors or polymerase chain reactions,” he wrote, but the “technical evolution” of toasters offers a “case study in profitable innovation.”
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  44. nailheads
    • 2007 April 8, David Colman, “Chained to His Desk”, New York Times:
      There are a lot of nail holes and nailheads sticking out.”
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  45. necrophilic
    • 2007 April 8, Dennis Lim, “The Year the Pie and Coffee Ran Out”, New York Times:
      (At its height the media hurricane landed Mr. Lynch on the cover of Time and Laura Palmer on the cover of Esquire, a distinctly necrophilic choice for Woman of the Year.)
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  46. nondefense
    • 2007 April 8, “Letters to the Editor”, New York Times:
      Jeter was defending his public nondefense of Alex Rodriguez throughout all the booing that Rodriguez endured last season.
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  47. nonpharma
    • 2007 April 8, Denise Caruso, “How to Confine the Plants of the Future?”, New York Times:
      To this end, some developers use plants like rice and safflower that self-pollinate, reducing the risk of contaminating nonpharma plants by wind and insect pollination.
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  48. nonqualified
    • 2007 April 8, “Calculating the Pay Figures”, New York Times:
      THE study also tracks information on pension and nonqualified deferred-compensation plans for companies filing under the new S.E.C. regulations.
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  49. nonsinger
    • 2007 April 8, Nate Chinen, “A Mutual Inspiration Society in Action”, New York Times:
      (Mr. Metheny once toured with Joni Mitchell ; Mr. Mehldau is the only nonsinger on the star-studded Joni Mitchell tribute album Nonesuch is releasing this month.)
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  50. nonslaveholding
    • 2007 April 8, Eric Foner, “The Three Souths”, New York Times:
      The Middle South (Virginia, North Carolina, Tennessee and Arkansas) contained large regions of nonslaveholding whites.
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  51. nonutilities
    • 2007 April 8, Barry Rehfeld, “A Run-Up Reduces Bargains in Utilities”, New York Times:
      Shaun Hong, the fund manager, said that he is primarily seeking capital gains from these nonutilities holdings.
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  52. offspeed
  53. outperformance
  54. parbaked
    • 2007 April 8, Christine Muhlke, “Canned Heat”, New York Times:
      Her book lures them to the stove with such gateway ingredients as olive-oil-packed tuna, cannellini beans and tapenade — items familiar to those who have dined at Campanile, the restaurant she owned with the chef Mark Peel, then her husband, or have browsed the tightly edited shelves at La Brea Bakery, which she and Peel opened in 1989 and sold for a reported $55 million in 2001 (although she still consults on how to bring their parbaked artisan-style bread to the masses).
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  55. pearlized
    • 2007 April 8, Bill Cunningham, “Let’s Go, Spring”, New York Times:
      Tiffany’s pearlized ostrich eggs.
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  56. pictorialism
    • 2007 April 8, Steven Heller, “Instant Messages”, New York Times:
      In the last 100 years this singularly American outdoor advertising genre — attacked by beautification and environmental advocates — has evolved from innocent pictorialism, built on idealized tableaus and famous trade characters, to an aggressive mélange of word and image strategically situated to pique desire and stimulate consumption.
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  57. porro *
    • 2007 April 8, Jon Pareles, “Heartbreak in Suburbia, Exuberance in Colombia”, New York Times:
      Latin rhythms that were fomented in New York, Puerto Rico, Cuba and elsewhere found a welcoming second home in Colombia, where they shared the dance floors with local sounds like the clip-clop beat of the cumbia and the tootling clarinet of the porro.
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  58. prefectural
    • 2007 April 8, Norimitsu Onishi, “In Japan’s Rural Areas, Remote Obstetrics Fills the Gap”, New York Times:
      Since the prefectural hospital here closed its maternity ward in 2002, pregnant women have had no choice but to make the long drive to Kamaishi, or another city with a maternity ward, to give birth.
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  59. pretravel
  60. prewashed
    • 2007 April 8, Christine Muhlke, “Canned Heat”, New York Times:
      “A Twist of the Wrist” green-lights prewashed salad, canned peas, jarred mayonnaise, boneless chicken breasts and more — a gigantic leap for someone for whom a chicken sandwich always involved roasting a chicken and making a batch of mayonnaise.
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  61. proddings
    • 2007 April 8, “Fiction Chronicle”, New York Times:
      There, they meet Marsh, a young British journalist covering the conflict, whose affection for Anthony takes the form of brutal proddings.
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  62. psychoanalyzed
    • 2007 April 8, “The Fabulist”, New York Times:
      Have you ever been psychoanalyzed?
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  63. rakehells
    • 2007 April 8, Joe Queenan, “Fancy Meeting You Here”, New York Times:
      “passing strange,” “the deuce with your circumstances” — it is the sort of book in which flint-hearted womenfolk are preyed upon by jack-a-ninny rakehells, if not belly-crawling snakes, who come gallivanting in from places hotter than Hades, presumably to rake hell while crawling on their bellies.
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  64. redolently
    • 2007 April 8, William Logan, “The Poet of Exile”, New York Times:
      Without the shape of the lyric subject, Walcott’s poetry becomes the registration of sensibility — and in texture and sensibility he has been a master, even if the redolently patterned verse has sometimes been laid down like linoleum.
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  65. relinquishers
    • 2007 April 8, Charles Siebert, “New Tricks”, New York Times:
      Mollaghan’s study, a joint project between Town Lake and the University of Texas’s Animal Personality Institute, makes use both of questionnaires filled out by dog relinquishers and of personality assessment forms designed for adopters in an attempt to better understand the mind-set not only of the abandoned animals but of their past and potential owners as well.
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  66. reregulated
    • 2007 April 8, Peter D. Kramer, “Hearing Voices”, New York Times:
      Imagine that years hence a person hears a voice that can be traced to a misfiring brain circuit that is easily reregulated by the application of a magnet.
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  67. restructurers
    • 2007 April 8, Conrad De Aenlle, “A (Relatively) Good Quarter for Foreign Stocks”, New York Times:
      AS far as Christopher Semenuk, manager of the TIAA-CREF International Equity fund, is concerned, time has already run out for Unilever, Siemens and others that he dismisses as serial restructurers.
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  68. retaliations
    • 2007 April 8, Kareem Fahim, “Trenton Is Tense After 9 Killings in 3 Months”, New York Times:
      But the homicides are enough: In part to prevent violent retaliations, the police have established a large presence in some parts of the city in recent weeks, especially near the housing projects.
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  69. robotlike
    • 2007 April 8, Eve Fairbanks, “Magic Words”, New York Times:
      To believe that the “enemy” frame is impossible for us to resist — that our behavior as citizens flows, robotlike, from the way we are manipulated by buzzwords — is to see us as Shakespeare saw those laughably malleable Romans in “Julius Caesar”: they are inspired first to hate Caesar by Brutus’ speech and then to love him by Antony’s, in the space of minutes.
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  70. shortcode
    • 2007 April 8, Hilary Howard, “Google Offers Flight Information by Text Message”, New York Times:
      Simply text Google by using the shortcode 466453, which spells Google on most phones, and enter the abbreviated airline (American Airlines is AA, for example) along with your flight number, and Google will respond promptly with an updated departure and arrival time, leaving a text message on your mobile device.
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  71. skordalia
    • 2007 April 8, “Bonnets at the Table”, New York Times:
      Michael Psilakis and Donatella Arpaia run this high-end Greek restaurant, where Mr. Psilakis seasons raw fish with fennel and ouzo; deconstructs skordalia, a garlicky dip, and turns it into a velvety soup; and cuts the richness of pork belly with an egg-and-lemon avgolemono sauce.
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  72. sloganeering
    • 2007 April 8, Steven Heller, “Instant Messages”, New York Times:
      Most commercial billboards aspire to the same heights — when it comes to sloganeering, anyway — attained by these religious signs.
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  73. squaresville
    • 2007 April 8, Charles Taylor, “My Favorite Spy”, New York Times:
      But too often it reads like the second-rate movies that in the ’60s tried to cash in on the Bond success, the Matt Helm and Derek Flint pictures in which 007’s cool was reduced to swinging bachelor squaresville, a place where it was believed that all the right accouterments — the right stereo system, the right booze, the right sex — equaled style and wit.
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  74. subadviser
    • 2007 April 8, William J. Holstein, “The Industry’s Critics Turn to Washington”, New York Times:
      In some cases the chairman of a mutual fund board owns the management and subadviser firms or has deep connections with them.
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  75. superagent
    • 2007 April 8, Charles Taylor, “My Favorite Spy”, New York Times:
      The plot of “Eye of the Archangel,” a workable travesty of superagent fiction, starts with one of Hitler ’s top scientists who, since the end of World War II, has been shunted from the Nazis to the Soviets to Arne Jespers, a black marketeer who wants this Teutonic Mr. Wizard to complete the fiendish thingamabob he was working on for the Führer.
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  76. supersecret
    • 2007 April 8, Charles Taylor, “My Favorite Spy”, New York Times:
      They too work as intelligence agents (for a supersecret group called the Consultancy).
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  77. tapenade
    • 2007 April 8, Christine Muhlke, “Canned Heat”, New York Times:
      Her book lures them to the stove with such gateway ingredients as olive-oil-packed tuna, cannellini beans and tapenade — items familiar to those who have dined at Campanile, the restaurant she owned with the chef Mark Peel, then her husband, or have browsed the tightly edited shelves at La Brea Bakery, which she and Peel opened in 1989 and sold for a reported $55 million in 2001 (although she still consults on how to bring their parbaked artisan-style bread to the masses).
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  78. torana *
    • 2007 April 8, Mia Fineman, “Travels Abroad Lead to Journeys Within”, New York Times:
      Examining the works in the galleries before the show opened, Ms. Davis said she was particularly drawn to objects with some connection to architecture, like a fragment of a metalwork mandala featuring a torana, a type of gateway common at Buddhist and Hindu shrines.
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  79. treviso
    • 2007 April 8, Christine Muhlke, “Canned Heat”, New York Times:
      4 heads treviso (radicchio may be substituted)
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  80. typologically
    • 2007 April 8, Michael Marissen, “Unsettling History of That Joyous ‘Hallelujah’”, New York Times:
      Jennens had the discernment to see that he couldn’t thwart his adversaries simply by producing reading matter insisting that biblical texts be understood both typologically and as Jesus-centered.
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  81. unconflicted
    • 2007 April 8, Andrew Ross Sorkin, “When a Bank Works Both Sides”, New York Times:
      Vice Chancellor Leo E. Strine Jr., who often presides over big deal-related cases at the Delaware Court of Chancery, said at the Tulane conference, "The idea that you get someone who’s unconflicted and has no experience is an idiotic notion."
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  82. uncredentialed
    • 2007 April 8, Dave Kehr, “Restless Innovations From Alain Resnais”, New York Times:
      He, and contemporaries like Agnes Varda and Chris Marker , came from the liberal intellectual establishment of the Left Bank, while Truffaut and many of his colleagues were uncredentialed Right Bank outsiders, whose politics, at least in the early days, tended toward Catholic conservatism.
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  83. underfinancing
  84. underperformance
    • 2007 April 8, Tim Gray, “Yes, It’s a 7-Year Streak, but No, They’re Not Bragging”, New York Times:
      Most funds on the underperformance list share this trait: their managers focus on buying large-capitalization growth stocks — shares in big companies whose earnings they expect to grow at above-average rates.
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  85. undertreated
    • 2007 April 8, “About the Series”, New York Times:
      Yet, in many instances, patients are undertreated or treated inappropriately.
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  86. underworkmen
    • 2007 April 8, Michael Marissen, “Unsettling History of That Joyous ‘Hallelujah’”, New York Times:
      The Anglican bishop Richard Kidder, for example, claimed in his huge 1690s treatise on Jesus as the Messiah that “the deists among us, who would run down our revealed religion, are but underworkmen to the Jews.”
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  87. unfunky
  88. unhip
    • 2007 April 8, Charles Taylor, “My Favorite Spy”, New York Times:
      It’s the unhip side of the latter, unfortunately, that seems to predominate.
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  89. unpatrolled
  90. unromanticized
    • 2007 April 8, Liesl Schillinger, “Get Out. No, Wait, Come Back!”, New York Times:
      THAT unromanticized wisdom should console the authors of “The Empty Nest,” a book of essays by parents who (mostly) mourn the departure of their young, even as they take guilty pleasure in being able (at last) to buy a red sports car, or walk around the living room naked.
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  91. unserved
    • 2007 April 8, Pamela Paul, “Proceed to Checkout”, New York Times:
      According to Barber, global inequality has left the planet with two kinds of potential customers: the poor of the undeveloped world, with vast and unserved needs but not the means to fulfill them, and the first-world rich, who have scads of disposable income but few real needs.
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  92. upzoning
    • 2007 April 8, Jeff Vandam, “Thinking Big at a Time Others Are Thinking Small”, New York Times:
      Instead, local residents want upzoning, a much less frequently requested designation, which would make possible larger structures, at least on certain specified streets.
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  93. yummo
    • 2007 April 8, Christine Muhlke, “Canned Heat”, New York Times:
      The chef admits that she was not familiar with Rachael Ray’s “30 Minute Meals” when she started the project, or at least she’s too polite to say that hers are 30-minute meals that would make Thomas Keller say yummo: orzo with dried porcini mushrooms, radicchio and aged balsamic vinegar; white asparagus in brown butter topped with a fried egg and capers; key lime custards with crème fraîche.
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Sequestered[edit]

  1. ahms
    • 2007 April 8, Thomas Vinciguerra, “Mrs. Wiseguy”, New York Times:
      I could do the best accent: ‘Raise yaw ahms up!
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  2. faw
    • 2007 April 8, Thomas Vinciguerra, “Mrs. Wiseguy”, New York Times:
      Reach faw da sky!’ ”
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  3. impressario = impresario
  4. ministrelsy = minstrelsy
    • 2007 April 8, The New York Times, “Jolly Good Show ... Or Was It?”, New York Times:
      Acting British is in effect a form of camp or ministrelsy, in which certain vocal and gestural traits stereotypically identified as national characteristics are exaggerated for easy, pleasing effect: the rolling, quasi-Shakespearean diction; the imperious eyebrows; the ability to pace and turn as if the studio back-lot soundstage were the boards of the Old Vic.
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