User:Visviva/NYT 20070415

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This is a list of lowercase non-hyphenated single words found in the 2007-04-15 issue of the New York Times which did not have English entries in the English Wiktionary when this list was created (2009-02-04).

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182197 tokens ‧ 134674 valid lowercase tokens ‧ 13212 types ‧ 113 (~ 0.855%) words before cleaning ‧ 

2007-04-15[edit]

  1. afterguard
  2. albondigas
    • 2007 April 15, “Expanding the Options”, New York Times:
      Tapas selections like Spanish omelets, mussels romesco, ceviche, jumbo shrimp with garlic, and albondigas — meatballs with tomato mint sauce — share the menu with larger plates like chicken and wild mushroom paella, and grilled pork chop with savoy cabbage, bacon and apple puree.
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  3. anticircumcision
    • 2007 April 15, Donald G. Mcneil Jr., “Preventing H.I.V., but at What Price?”, New York Times:
      (Circumcision ’s effect on sex is a white-hot issue in the United States for the small but vocal anticircumcision lobby.
      add
  4. antihumanism
    • 2007 April 15, Ken Kalfus, “They Had a Hammer”, New York Times:
      In his frigid antihumanism, Sorokin parts company with Russian satirists like Gogol, Bulgakov, Yuri Olesha and, more recently, Viktor Pelevin.
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  5. banlieues *
    • 2007 April 15, David Rieff, “Battle Over the Banlieues”, New York Times:
      We were in Les Bosquets, one of the impoverished housing projects that are scattered across the banlieues, the heavily immigrant working-class suburbs that surround Paris.
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  6. basepaths
    • 2007 April 15, Jake Mooney, “The Bat Spat”, New York Times:
      Still, practices for the new season had begun, and the sounds of spring were in the air: somebody heckling the pitcher, two infielders calling for a popup, and the thud of spiked shoes around the basepaths.
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  7. basmati
  8. bek *
  9. blanchingly
    • 2007 April 15, Sophie Harrison, “Memoirs of a Geisha’s Sister”, New York Times:
      “Grotesque” is full of schoolgirls in long socks but blanchingly free of cuteness, a combination we might call Uh-Oh Kitty.
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  10. bootprints
    • 2007 April 15, Karen Durbin, “A Director, and Mother, Confronts Infanticide”, New York Times:
      But almost from the first moments — ski-booted feet trudging through snow, then faltering as blood seeps into the bootprints — what drives the narrative is a single question: What has she done?
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  11. bronzey
    • 2007 April 15, Lynn Hirschberg, “Late Bloomer”, New York Times:
      For unexpected drama, Pair red lipstick, like Lancôme le rouge absolu in jezabel, with bronzey eyes and nails lacquered in a wine Polish, like Lancôme vernis magnétic nail polish in molten.
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  12. casitas
    • 2007 April 15, Jennifer Conlin, “A Hot Hotel Town in the Arizona Desert”, New York Times:
      It hasrefurbished the mountain casitas overlooking Paradise Valley to go with the largest infinity pool in Arizona , an indoor-outdoor Asian-inspired spa and a meditation garden .
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  13. clearheadedness
    • 2007 April 15, “‘Once Upon a Country’”, New York Times:
      There are many other voices of reason in the sad but vibrant internal debate among Palestinians, but Wieseltier gives the backhanded compliment to Nusseibeh of saying his clearheadedness is “exceptional.”
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  14. cobwebbed
    • 2007 April 15, Fernanda Eberstadt, “La Vida Loca”, New York Times:
      They live crammed into one filthy, dimly lit, cobwebbed half of the apartment, which is crammed with a grand piano and gilt mirrors attached to candelabra — relics of their former wealth that they sell off in weekly installments to an itinerant ragman in order to survive.
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  15. cocktailery
    • 2007 April 15, Jonathan Miles, “Tequila’s New Take on the Old-Fashioned”, New York Times:
      Death & Co., a Lower East Side cocktailery that opened in January, serves the Oaxaca Old-Fashioned, in which tequila and its more rough-and-tumble cousin, mezcal, steal the starring role that bourbon plays in a traditional Old-Fashioned, with agave nectar standing in for simple syrup in the sweetener role.
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  16. counterplay
  17. counterreaction
  18. counterriot
    • 2007 April 15, Michael Chabon, “‘Gentlemen of the Road’”, New York Times:
      For two days and nights, since rumors first stole across the bridge with whispers of 500 rebel Arsiyah put to death in the yard of the Qomr, the fugitive partners had been trapped by riot and counterriot with 15 whores, male and female, among them Hanukkah’s beloved Sarah; the procuress Celestial Hind, supposedly a bastard half-sister of the kagan; a cat; a weasel; and an ill-tempered macaque called Fortunatus, a name that delighted Amram, being “Zelikman” put into Latin.
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  19. cukes
    • 2007 April 15, Serge Schmemann, “Dispatches From the Front Line of the Great Vodka War”, New York Times:
      The Eurocrats in Brussels are paid princely salaries to decide whether feta has to come from Greece (yes) or how curved cucumbers can be (Class I cukes are allowed a bend of 10 millimeters per 10 centimeters of length, according to Commission Regulation No. 1677/88).
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  20. deveining
    • 2007 April 15, Allen Salkin, “Fire, the Wheel and, of Course, Mop Slippers”, New York Times:
      The drawers of her recently remodeled kitchen in Clinton Hill, Brooklyn, are so full she is now stuffing a hall closet with gadgets, among them a shrimp deveining knife and a marinade injector.
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  21. dosshouse
    • 2007 April 15, Michael Chabon, “‘Gentlemen of the Road’”, New York Times:
      It was the profoundest hour of the night, their third as inmates of Princess Celestial Hind’s dosshouse, a converted wool factory fronting on an alley off Sturgeon Street, not far from the Caspian wharfs.
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  22. emblematize
    • 2007 April 15, James Wood, “The Visceral Realist”, New York Times:
      The book is narrated by Father Urrutia, a dying priest and conservative literary critic, a member of Opus Dei, who comes to emblematize, by the novella's end, the silent complicity of the Chilean literary establishment with the murderous Pinochet regime.
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  23. galelike
  24. geoeconomic
    • 2007 April 15, Thomas L. Friedman, “The Power of Green”, New York Times:
      I want to rename it geostrategic, geoeconomic, capitalistic and patriotic.
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  25. glorias *
  26. grotesqueries
    • 2007 April 15, Sam Tanenhaus, “Playing Along With Imus”, New York Times:
      Of course, I was hearing other things, too, and they were disturbing at times: slurs against black athletes, an “impersonation” of Clarence Thomas that didn’t sound like him at all (unlike the impersonations of white figures), but instead drew on the stalest of the “here come de judge” grotesqueries of a previous era; the almost continual soundtrack of leering sexual comments.
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  27. hipsterish
    • 2007 April 15, Dennis Lim, “Explaining Movies by Jumping Right Inside Them”, New York Times:
      Attracting hipsterish crowds at speaking engagements around the world — one of the trendiest new night spots in Buenos Aires is named for him — Mr. Zizek is a bona fide intellectual celebrity.
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  28. hitless
  29. hyperaggressive
    • 2007 April 15, David Rieff, “Battle Over the Banlieues”, New York Times:
      A lot of this was bravado, of course, friends showing off for friends in the disaffected, hyperaggressive macho style that now predominates among France’s disenfranchised suburban young.
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  30. icelike
    • 2007 April 15, Ken Kalfus, “They Had a Hammer”, New York Times:
      It also revolves around a symbolic essential substance: in this case, a crystalline icelike material, mined from a meteor, that can awaken the power of speech in selected human hearts.
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  31. imaginer *
    • 2007 April 15, James Wood, “The Visceral Realist”, New York Times:
      This wonderfully strange Chilean imaginer, at once a grounded realist and a lyricist of the speculative, who died in 2003 at the age of 50, has been acknowledged for a few years now in the Spanish-speaking world as one of the greatest and most influential modern writers.
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  32. indecencies
    • 2007 April 15, Lucy Ellmann, “Under the Sea”, New York Times:
      His translator, Laurie Thompson, has presumably tried to replicate Mankell’s style, or lack of it, and can’t be held responsible for indecencies like “Her tears seemed to tiptoe out of her eyes” and “The lead breathed.
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  33. intertribal
    • 2007 April 15, Lydia Polgreen, “Militia Talks Could Reshape Conflict in Darfur”, New York Times:
      Here in eastern Chad, where the intertribal violence gripping Darfur has spilled over, Arab tribes have found themselves victims of non-Arab militias armed by Chad’s government, according to tribal leaders.
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  34. janjaweed
    • 2007 April 15, Lydia Polgreen, “Militia Talks Could Reshape Conflict in Darfur”, New York Times:
      The main perpetrators of some of the worst atrocities have been government-sponsored Arab militias that have come to be known by a local epithet, janjaweed.
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  35. kaffeeklatsch *
  36. kagan
    • 2007 April 15, Michael Chabon, “‘Gentlemen of the Road’”, New York Times:
      For two days and nights, since rumors first stole across the bridge with whispers of 500 rebel Arsiyah put to death in the yard of the Qomr, the fugitive partners had been trapped by riot and counterriot with 15 whores, male and female, among them Hanukkah’s beloved Sarah; the procuress Celestial Hind, supposedly a bastard half-sister of the kagan; a cat; a weasel; and an ill-tempered macaque called Fortunatus, a name that delighted Amram, being “Zelikman” put into Latin.
      add
  37. kasbah
    • 2007 April 15, Taylor Holliday, “Learning at the Stoves of the Masters”, New York Times:
      Guests learn two dishes they’ve chosen from the hotel restaurant’s menu — perhaps a beef tagine with dates and almonds or a lamb couscous with seven vegetables — and enjoy the fruits of their labor under the kasbah garden’s olive and fig trees.
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  38. magnificats
  39. magno *
    • 2007 April 15, Michael Patrick Hearn, “Children’s Books / Young Adult”, New York Times:
      All the marvelous gadgets and vehicles that Owen discovers, like magno guns and Q-cars (with wheels nearly as high as a three-story building), could have come out of George Lucas’s storehouse.
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  40. mahimahi *
    • 2007 April 15, The Associated Press, “Major Effort Is Under Way to Revive and Preserve Hawaii’s Native Tongue”, New York Times:
      While fluency is still rare — just 1 percent of the state’s 180,000 public school students attend immersion programs — Hawaiian words are commonplace around the islands, from vowel-filled town names such as Ka’a’awa and ‘Aiea to popular fish like mahimahi.
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  41. marathoning
  42. mechanicals
    • 2007 April 15, Jerry Garrett, “Another Angle on the V-Twins”, New York Times:
      The lean 473-pound Griso features an exposed twin-spar frame that serves not just as a rock-solid platform for the mechanicals, but also as a wrap-around showcase for Italian design.
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  43. milonga
    • 2007 April 15, “Kimberly Young, Stefano Rivella”, New York Times:
      “In Argentina, you often go to the milonga by yourself and look for ladies to dance with there,” Dr. Rivella said.
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  44. milongas
  45. mineworkers
    • 2007 April 15, Ruth Conniff, “Children’s Books”, New York Times:
      In “Chase,” Haas strikes a balance between evoking the brutal lives of the exploited mineworkers and acknowledging the murderousness of some of their deeds.
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  46. moonshiners
  47. multicharacter
    • 2007 April 15, “Handel and the Jews; Foreign Treasures; Accents and Acting”, New York Times:
      I invite readers to sample Emma Thompson ’s odious multicharacter turn in “Angels in America” or Anthony Hopkins in, well, anything, to get a sense of just how awful (and thus fabulously entertaining) bad British acting can be.
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  48. multidepartment
    • 2007 April 15, Cassi Feldman, “Casino-Bound, Complaints in Their Wake”, New York Times:
      After speeches from neighbors and parents, Lolita Jackson, Manhattan director of the Mayor’s Community Assistance Unit, announced plans for a multidepartment meeting this week on how to better regulate Chinatown transportation.
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  49. murderousness
    • 2007 April 15, Ruth Conniff, “Children’s Books”, New York Times:
      In “Chase,” Haas strikes a balance between evoking the brutal lives of the exploited mineworkers and acknowledging the murderousness of some of their deeds.
      add
  50. mythmaking
    • 2007 April 15, Polly Shulman, “Children’s Books”, New York Times:
      At least in this book, Leavitt’s mythmaking is more gripping than the specifics of her story.
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  51. nonhockey
    • 2007 April 15, Jon Glaser, “Tough Guy”, New York Times:
      It looks as if I stole the regular, nonhockey backpack of a giant.
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  52. nonhyphenated
    • 2007 April 15, “Stateless No More (1 Letter)”, New York Times:
      Despite 40 years of being a Bosnian, after being “ethnically cleansed” from our Sarajevo home at the beginning of the Bosnian civil war and then erased from government records, my family and I now celebrate the day when we arrived in the United States and became — in our hearts, and soon thereafter in American government records — nonhyphenated Americans.
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  53. noninterview
  54. nonischemic
    • 2007 April 15, Nate Chinen, “Don Ho, Hawaiian Musician, Dies at 76”, New York Times:
      Late in 2005, Mr. Ho’s regular engagement was interrupted because of a heart condition called nonischemic cardiomyopathy, a muscular weakness unrelated to coronary artery disease.
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  55. nonunionized
  56. overcorrected
    • 2007 April 15, David Kocieniewski, “Police Find Pickup Driver Who Left Site”, New York Times:
      But when the pickup slipped off the pavement, the driver overcorrected into traffic, causing the crash, the statement said.
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  57. overprotection
  58. pelletized
    • 2007 April 15, Jay Romano, “Giving the Lawn What It Needs”, New York Times:
      If lime is called for, Mr. Sawchuck recommends the pelletized type, as opposed to the powdery kind, because it is less messy.
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  59. piquillo
    • 2007 April 15, “Expanding the Options”, New York Times:
      The small plates employ plenty of simple riffs on good Spanish ingredients, among them bruschetta-like tapas of white anchovies and tomato; and a portion of piquillo peppers — plenty likable on their own — from which spills an overstuffed filling of blood sausage, pine nuts and capers.
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  60. pivotable
    • 2007 April 15, Jon Pareles, “Just Feist. Just Wait.”, New York Times:
      Feist named the album “The Reminder” as “a pivotable riddle: something that could change and feed in and didn’t necessarily have a concrete point to it,” she more or less explained.
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  61. predraft
  62. presentencing
    • 2007 April 15, “Did Anyone Ask About a Yacht?”, New York Times:
      Mr. Scrushy has been on presentencing release since a federal jury in Montgomery last year convicted him of bribing former Gov. Don Siegelman of Alabama.
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  63. psychopathologies
    • 2007 April 15, “Fiction Chronicle”, New York Times:
      But that strategy goes awry — the prostitute he selects as his victim is at least as disturbed as Kawashima, and their combined psychopathologies keep getting in the way.
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  64. rallygoers
    • 2007 April 15, Manny Fernandez, “For the Environment, Rallies Great and Small (and Unusual Attire)”, New York Times:
      Many rallygoers said yesterday’s actions reflected a widespread resurgence of the environmental movement, boosted in part by former Vice President Al Gore ’s documentary, “An Inconvenient Truth,” which was shown at many of the gatherings.
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  65. rearticulated
    • 2007 April 15, Liesl Schillinger, “The Night Train to Bucharest”, New York Times:
      Can such a child be ennobled by the passage of time, his struggles granted retroactive gravitas and his childish confusions rearticulated with adult clarity?
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  66. recountings
    • 2007 April 15, Sam Tanenhaus, “Playing Along With Imus”, New York Times:
      Months after his first mention of the book he was still obsessing, daily it seemed, about minutiae of the Chambers-Alger Hiss espionage confrontation, while his sidekicks histrionically greeted his recountings with a chorus of groans and protests of the “not-again” variety.
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  67. reknit
    • 2007 April 15, Thomas L. Friedman, “The Power of Green”, New York Times:
      We will need to find a way to reknit America at home, reconnect America abroad and restore America to its natural place in the global order — as the beacon of progress, hope and inspiration.
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  68. repointed
    • 2007 April 15, Christopher Gray, “Where Town Met Country”, New York Times:
      The town house is now being cleaned and repointed, and the turret is being rebuilt.
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  69. repointing
    • 2007 April 15, Christopher Gray, “Where Town Met Country”, New York Times:
      There, Joakim Aspegren, a principal in the Manhattan firm of Architecture Restoration Conservation, is supervising a program of cleaning, repointing, replacing copper trim, installing a new slate roof and completely reconstructing the turret.
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  70. retaliations
    • 2007 April 15, Ruth Conniff, “Children’s Books”, New York Times:
      As Haas writes in an end note, labor unrest had erupted in a series of murders and brutal retaliations.
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  71. serrano *
  72. stalwartly
    • 2007 April 15, Fernanda Eberstadt, “La Vida Loca”, New York Times:
      While the old folks writhe in a hell of their own making, Andrea stalwartly goes about the business of being young: studying for exams, befriending a group of would-be Bohemian student-painters, attending her first dance, getting kissed by a boy she doesn’t like.
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  73. steamlining
    • 2007 April 15, Bob Golfen, “Showing Off Cars With Real Curves”, New York Times:
      A more down-to-earth vehicle is the ’34 Chrysler Imperial, a bold attempt to bring steamlining to the showroom.
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  74. stylization
    • 2007 April 15, Bob Golfen, “Showing Off Cars With Real Curves”, New York Times:
      The actual science of aerodynamics was having an impact, but ultimately, it’s the stylization of that.”
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  75. subkiloton
    • 2007 April 15, David E. Sanger, “North Korea Misses Important Deadline”, New York Times:
      The test was something of a fizzle, a subkiloton explosion, but it was enough to win unanimous passage of a resolution that imposes new economic sanctions on the North.
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  76. superhigh
    • 2007 April 15, Ben Stein, “Yes, Wall St. Still Gets Some Things Right”, New York Times:
      Sometimes they have to pour immense amounts of sand — like a million pounds in a six-hour period — into a well under superhigh pressure to break up the rock and release the oil to flow to the surface.
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  77. superromantic
  78. supertough
    • 2007 April 15, Jon Glaser, “Tough Guy”, New York Times:
      A face that makes me look supertough in the minds of my fellow passengers.
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  79. symbolist
    • 2007 April 15, Randy Kennedy, “When Picasso and Braque Went to the Movies”, New York Times:
      The general picture that has emerged is one of Cubism bubbling up out of a thick Parisian stew of symbolist poetry, Cézanne, cafe society, African masks, absinthe and a fascination with all things mechanical and modern, mostly airplanes and automatons.
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  80. thuddingly
    • 2007 April 15, James Wood, “The Visceral Realist”, New York Times:
      Likewise, this fantasia about falcons in every European city might have been thuddingly allegorical or irritatingly whimsical, and isn't.
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  81. trailerlike
    • 2007 April 15, Phil Patton, “Airstream: The Concept Travels Well”, New York Times:
      Mr. Larsen also related the Airstream to the work of artists like Andrea Zittel, who builds trailerlike works, installed in galleries or outdoor installations.
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  82. undereducated
    • 2007 April 15, “‘Once Upon a Country’”, New York Times:
      How convenient that young, armed, undereducated males of Palestine stand in for an entire population.
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  83. unknowables
    • 2007 April 15, Donald G. Mcneil Jr., “Preventing H.I.V., but at What Price?”, New York Times:
      Because of these unknowables, no domestic medical authority, from the New York City Health Department to the American Urological Association, has a policy on adult circumcision yet.
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  84. unmollified
  85. unrelievedly
    • 2007 April 15, Fernanda Eberstadt, “La Vida Loca”, New York Times:
      The idea that there might be a lone woman in what seems the unrelievedly male pantheon of Spanish novelists of the post-Civil War era — an era which to outsiders, as Mario Vargas Llosa writes in his introduction to “Nada,” seems to reek of “fustiness, sacristy and Francoism” — was like discovering an extra story built in a house you thought you knew.
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  86. verdejo
    • 2007 April 15, Howard G. Goldberg, “A Riot of Flavor From Spain”, New York Times:
      The grassy bouquet and mouth-filling melon flavor result from a blend of native verdejo and viura grapes and sauvignon blanc harvested in Rueda, in northwestern Spain.
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  87. villagelike
    • 2007 April 15, David Mcaninch, “A Road Not Taken, Much”, New York Times:
      They are signs of a street life that, though distinctly urban in its grit and rough edges, is more villagelike than cosmopolitan, a life lived beyond the reach of large-scale gentrification, a long way from the tourist traps and even the most far-flung outposts of hip New York.
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  88. viura
    • 2007 April 15, Howard G. Goldberg, “A Riot of Flavor From Spain”, New York Times:
      The grassy bouquet and mouth-filling melon flavor result from a blend of native verdejo and viura grapes and sauvignon blanc harvested in Rueda, in northwestern Spain.
      add
  89. warung
    • 2007 April 15, Calvin Sims, “Indonesia: Gambling That Tolerance Will Trump Fear”, New York Times:
      A 43-year-old man named Rudy, who runs my favorite warung, or food stall, in Jakarta, put it this way: “Indonesians are turning to Islam for help because everything else we have tried has failed us — the Dutch, the military dictatorships, even democracy.
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Sequestered[edit]

  1. cabaceo
    • 2007 April 15, “Kimberly Young, Stefano Rivella”, New York Times:
      That look — officially called the cabaceo — was successful and when she saw it, Ms. Young responded with an affirmative nod.
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  2. panzerdivizion
    • 2007 April 15, Charles Duhigg, “The Pilotless Plane That Only Looks Like Child’s Play”, New York Times:
      In 1940, Germany toppled France in 20 days and the panzerdivizion symbolized war’s shift from drawn-out conflicts using massive fortifications to rapid-fire engagements built around manned, motorized armor.
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  3. musicalizable: protologism
    • 2007 April 15, Jesse Green, “Grown-Up Chorus Boy’s Big Leap Forward”, New York Times:
      Not only is it the first Broadway show he’s directed, it’s also a ridiculously high-profile property: the $13 million jewel in the crown of MGM’s musicalizable film catalog.
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  4. panzerdivizions
    • 2007 April 15, Charles Duhigg, “The Pilotless Plane That Only Looks Like Child’s Play”, New York Times:
      Using new technologies — like radio and fast-moving armored vehicles — they created the blitzkrieg, or “lightning war,” a strategy that allowed them to end-run their enemies’ trenches by using panzerdivizions — small, sprightly forces that revolutionized how battles were fought.
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  5. reconstuction = reconstruction
    • 2007 April 15, “‘Radicals for Capitalism’”, New York Times:
      In 2004, The New Republic magazine noted: “As early as December 2001, Cato Institute scholars were writing op-eds urging the administration not to go to war against Saddam Hussein ; when it did, Cato was one of the first think tanks to warn that lack of postwar planning would doom the reconstuction effort.”
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  6. savoy *
    • 2007 April 15, “Expanding the Options”, New York Times:
      Tapas selections like Spanish omelets, mussels romesco, ceviche, jumbo shrimp with garlic, and albondigas — meatballs with tomato mint sauce — share the menu with larger plates like chicken and wild mushroom paella, and grilled pork chop with savoy cabbage, bacon and apple puree.
      add
  7. wooooo
  8. wreckest
    • 2007 April 15, Kathryn Shattuck, “What’s on Sunday Night”, New York Times:
      No. 1: “Check thyself before thou wreckest thyself.”
      add