User:Visviva/NYT 20070429

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to: navigation, search
← Previous (2007-04-28) Words harvested from the New York Times, 2007-04-29
  • List status: open
→ Next (2007-04-30)

This is a list of lowercase non-hyphenated single words found in the 2007-04-29 issue of the New York Times which did not have English entries in the English Wiktionary when this list was created (2009-02-04).

[ see all NYT pages ] - [ see all tracking lists ]

178797 tokens ‧ 132157 valid lowercase tokens ‧ 13315 types ‧ 91 (~ 0.683%) words before cleaning ‧ 

2007-04-29[edit]

  1. antipolitical
    • 2007 April 29, Alan Riding, “My Crazy Life”, New York Times:
      I stuck to formulating and distributing antipolitical texts.”
      add
  2. automotives
    • 2007 April 29, Andrew E. Kramer, “A Russian Oligarch Goes Shopping”, New York Times:
      President Vladimir V. Putin is pursuing policies of state ownership in oil, automotives and aerospace.
      add
  3. balletmaster
    • 2007 April 29, Roslyn Sulcas, “A Year in the Life of a Ballet”, New York Times:
      But Mr. Martins, who succeeded George Balanchine as balletmaster in chief in 1983, has been brooding on “Romeo and Juliet” for years, watching DVDs of other choreographers’ versions and obsessively listening to the score.
      add
  4. balletmasters
    • 2007 April 29, Roslyn Sulcas, “A Year in the Life of a Ballet”, New York Times:
      But for the dancers, balletmasters, designers, production manager, musicians, stagehands, carpenters, fabric painters, costume-makers, sword-fighting teachers and above all the choreographer, this will be the moment when more than a year of intense thought, planning and activity is put to the test.
      add
  5. barehand
    • 2007 April 29, Pat Borzi, “Normalcy Returns: Rivera Gets First Save”, New York Times:
      Rivera retired the next three batters in order, with third baseman Alex Rodriguez contributing a nifty barehand pickup and throw on Julio Lugo’s roller.
      add
  6. bek *
    • 2007 April 29, Michael Chabon, “‘Gentlemen of the Road’”, New York Times:
      By the third hour, when the breathless messenger at last found the bek and transmitted the sealed order, two dozen long ships were rounding the headland on whose summit Buljan stood in the falling snow, waiting to see if — as every other soul on Qizl, along the river, watching from the walls of the city hoped — the Northmen meant to sail on.
      add
  7. blazingly
    • 2007 April 29, Andrew C. Revkin, “Carbon-Neutral Is Hip, but Is It Green?”, New York Times:
      Recent counts by Business Week magazine and several environmental watchdog groups tally the trade in offsets at more than $100 million a year and growing blazingly fast.
      add
  8. blurbed
    • 2007 April 29, Henry Alford, “Literary Misblurbing”, New York Times:
      On seeing the finished version of “Never Eat Your Heart Out,” a memoir by Judith Moore that he had blurbed, Bernard Cooper was surprised to see that his words of praise had been topped off with the hosanna “Bravo!”
      add
  9. bohemia
    • 2007 April 29, Ruth La Ferla, “The Pack Rat Who Supplies the Scenic Illusion”, New York Times:
      For the Roundabout Theater’s revival of the 1990 Craig Lucas romance “Prelude to a Kiss” at the American Airlines Theater, for which he created the sets, Mr. Loquasto devised a backdrop of row upon row of SoHo-style factory windows to suggest the bohemia of downtown Manhattan.
      add
  10. buildingwide
    • 2007 April 29, Stephanie Rosenbloom, “A Beautiful Day in the Neighborhood”, New York Times:
      “It’s almost impossible not to make a friend here,” said Danny SiFonte, the resident manager with a buildingwide celebrity akin to that of Norm on “Cheers.”
      add
  11. cannae *
    • 2007 April 29, Dwight Garner, “Inside the List”, New York Times:
      Here are five that seem worth preserving in print: “Better not to leave here than to have to come back” (Jonathan Franzen, “The Corrections” ); “She viewed ethnic cleansing, famine and genocide as direct threats to her furniture” (Arundhati Roy, “The God of Small Things” ); “I did not pan out” (Sam Lipsyte, “Home Land” ); “If things go a bit dodgy, ah jist cannae be bothered” (Irvine Welsh, “Trainspotting” ); and this line, spoken by a combat photographer in Rory Stewart’s “Places in Between,” when asked why he doesn’t carry a zoom lens: “I am the zoom.”
      add
  12. cardplaying
    • 2007 April 29, John Anderson, “Love and Loneliness on the Las Vegas Strip”, New York Times:
      It doesn’t seem accidental that the phrase “luck of the draw” can apply equally to cardplaying or gunslinging, or that the denouement of “Lucky You” — a showdown between Mr. Bana’s character and his nemesis, L. C., played by Robert Duvall — recalls not just the 52-card catharsis of “The Cincinnati Kid” but also the showdowns that climax many great westerns.
      add
  13. carnitas
    • 2007 April 29, “Past the Bleachers”, New York Times:
      This taqueria makes gorgeously overstuffed tortas, sandwiches of carnitas (roast pork) or cecina (dried beef) with diced tomatoes, lettuce, avocado, queso fresco and pickled jalapeños, all pressed into a softball-size foil package.
      add
  14. cecina
    • 2007 April 29, “Past the Bleachers”, New York Times:
      This taqueria makes gorgeously overstuffed tortas, sandwiches of carnitas (roast pork) or cecina (dried beef) with diced tomatoes, lettuce, avocado, queso fresco and pickled jalapeños, all pressed into a softball-size foil package.
      add
  15. chesslike
    • 2007 April 29, Emily Brady, “Sweet Victories”, New York Times:
      Pierre-Louis Lempereur, a suave United Nations diplomat seated at one of the linen-clothed tables, was one of many with a chesslike voting strategy.
      add
  16. clenbuterol
    • 2007 April 29, Juliet Macur, “Records Show More to Come in Steroid Case”, New York Times:
      The Grimsley affidavit, dated May 31, 2006 — five and a half months after the Radomski affidavit — stated that Grimsley had used performance-enhancing drugs like human growth hormone, amphetamines and the anabolic steroid named clenbuterol, one of the drugs that Radomski said he had sold once a go-between in baseball had set him up with many of his clients.
      add
  17. clubbiness
    • 2007 April 29, Jon Meacham, “Friends of Winston”, New York Times:
      When Harold Nicolson spoke out against the government’s abandonment of Czechoslovakia after Munich, he was reproached on grounds of clubbiness: “The actual expression used to me was ‘You must not bat against your own side’ — as if it were a game of cricket that was being played in this most revered assembly.”
      add
  18. cocktaildom
    • 2007 April 29, Jonathan Miles, “The Real Manhattan”, New York Times:
      Unlike many other cocktails that have recently been roused from long hibernation, the Manhattan never really slumbered, having been kept drowsily awake through the lean years of cocktaildom by French-cuffed businessmen and other habitués of old-guard hotel bars and private clubs.
      add
  19. communitarianism
    • 2007 April 29, Timothy Noah, “Notes From an Ex-Senator”, New York Times:
      Bradley then answers each false narrative with a true narrative that expresses communitarianism, fiscal sobriety, respect for the environment and other social values typically neglected by the right.
      add
  20. contextualist
    • 2007 April 29, Christopher Gray, “A Man Who Minds His P’s and Q’s”, New York Times:
      He is more of a contextualist, believing that “letters are fluid, that they change with time and circumstance — the entire word is more important than a single letter, and its form can fluctuate.”
      add
  21. copperheads
    • 2007 April 29, Beverly Lowry, “The One That Got Away”, New York Times:
      He begins by tracking the thoughts of an old farmer who, while in his fields dodging copperheads and bashing at spiderwebs, envisions the catfish pond he plans to have dug and stocked on his land.
      add
  22. deadbolted
    • 2007 April 29, Stephanie Rosenbloom, “A Beautiful Day in the Neighborhood”, New York Times:
      Many get to know one another solely by what manages to permeate their deadbolted doors — an odoriferous stew, the wail of a child, the hushed sighs of intimate moments.
      add
  23. deviators
    • 2007 April 29, Jon Meacham, “Friends of Winston”, New York Times:
      For Tories like Cartland, deviating from the Chamberlain line was seen as betrayal, not disagreement, and the deviators were subjected to raw schoolboy pressure.
      add
  24. downzoning
    • 2007 April 29, Claire Wilson, “If It Stayed the Same, That Would Be Different”, New York Times:
      “All downzoning does is increase the minimum size of the lot, making the resulting lots more expensive and the houses that are built on them more expensive,” said Mr. Lee, who is also chairman of the Staten Island Economic Development Corporation.
      add
  25. forechecking
  26. greenmarkets
    • 2007 April 29, “Family First, Then Task Forces”, New York Times:
      Lois Quam President of public and senior markets groups, United HealthCare BIRTH DATE June 12, 1961 PASTIME Enjoys visiting greenmarkets and cooking for family and friends.
      add
  27. grinded
    • 2007 April 29, Lola Ogunnaike, “DJ AM: His Life, Times, Shoes”, New York Times:
      He’s someone who has grinded all the way to the top, and he deserves all the attention and money he is getting right now.”
      add
  28. heirheads
    • 2007 April 29, Lola Ogunnaike, “DJ AM: His Life, Times, Shoes”, New York Times:
      It would seem easy to write him off as another playboy who has managed to date his way to B-list stardom in the sketchy tradition of pampered heirheads like Paris Latsis, Brandon Davis and Stavros Niarchos.
      add
  29. hellos
    • 2007 April 29, Stephanie Rosenbloom, “A Beautiful Day in the Neighborhood”, New York Times:
      In many new buildings, though, neighbors are venturing beyond tight-lipped hellos at the mailbox.
      add
  30. inswinging
    • 2007 April 29, Reuters, “United Wins in Frantic Comeback”, New York Times:
      Turner, in goal because Everton’s regular keeper, the American Tim Howard, is on loan this season from United and is not allowed to play against his parent club, fumbled an inswinging corner from Ryan Giggs, allowing the ball to drop at the feet of John O’Shea who lashed it into the empty net from close range.
      add
  31. kagan
    • 2007 April 29, Michael Chabon, “‘Gentlemen of the Road’”, New York Times:
      At first light, around the time that the body of the kagan — a body that had already begun to manifest decidedly uncorpselike signs of movement — was being carried by an ill-assorted trio into a springhouse near a little-used gate of the Palace through which corpses and those who tended to them traditionally passed, the watch posted atop Qizl caught sight of a scattering of black seeds against the flickering gray of the southern horizon.
      add
  32. kender *
    • 2007 April 29, Michael Chabon, “‘Gentlemen of the Road’”, New York Times:
      This faithful Wend was the one who, woken earlier in the night by an urgent pealing of his master’s bell, had conveyed from the tower apartment to the quarters of the messenger corps three sealed copies of a written fiat, to be delivered at once to the bek, to the kender and to the grand rabbi of Atil.
      add
  33. knowingness
    • 2007 April 29, Matt Steinglass, “Missing Person”, New York Times:
      It is far harder to affect the jaded knowingness of Graham Greene when you're worried that Zakes Mda will let everyone know you're talking nonsense.
      add
  34. lehua
  35. lemminglike
    • 2007 April 29, Francine Prose, “Love in a Time of Dystopia”, New York Times:
      As soon as it becomes clear that Margaret is going to live, the urgency of the lemminglike eastward migration propels the pair onto the highway, where they are assaulted by the sort of murdering, raping, greedy bad boys we may have met in other dystopias.
      add
  36. majoritarian
    • 2007 April 29, Michael Lind, “Everybody’s a Liberal”, New York Times:
      He argues persuasively that “liberalism has no way to advance without a majoritarian politics.”
      add
  37. mavenim
    • 2007 April 29, William Safire, “Fall Guy”, New York Times:
      In dealing with Standard English, lexicographers, etymologists, semanticists and usage mavenim can bring hard-earned authority to definitions, giving needed precision to the language, but when it comes to slang, the experts are the nonexperts.
      add
  38. microdistillers
    • 2007 April 29, Jonathan Miles, “The Real Manhattan”, New York Times:
      On a recent Monday, the two microdistillers introduced their latest offering at a party at the Four Seasons: Hudson Manhattan Rye, a 92-proof whiskey made with 100-percent rye ground at the Tuthilltown mill.
      add
  39. mistruths
    • 2007 April 29, Joyce Cohen, “A Surprise on the East Side”, New York Times:
      It became easy for them to spot the mistruths in online listings.
      add
  40. momo *
    • 2007 April 29, Jeff Vandam, “For a People Overlooked, a Lens at Last”, New York Times:
      THE questions began over momo, small Nepali dumplings filled with minced chicken and chives, in the mirror-lined dining room of Chilli Chicken, a restaurant on Roosevelt Avenue in Jackson Heights that is run by a Nepali man who had a Bluetooth headset attached to his ear.
      add
  41. mortarless
    • 2007 April 29, Ethan Todras-Whitehill, “Touring the Spirit World”, New York Times:
      Sites built by ancient civilizations whose construction techniques are not settled fact — like Stonehenge and the perfectly fitting but mortarless walls of the Inca at Machu Picchu , as well as the pyramids — are embraced as evidence that those civilizations had mystical powers.
      add
  42. multibedroom
    • 2007 April 29, Jeff Vandam, “Park Condos, but the Park Comes Later”, New York Times:
      The building will ultimately have a wide variety of apartment configurations, from high-ceilinged 588-square-foot studios to multibedroom penthouses with up to 4,638 square feet — as well as those town houses, on the west side, nearest to the water.
      add
  43. multicamera
    • 2007 April 29, Andrew Wallenstein, “How YouTube Helped LisaNova Start HerCareer”, New York Times:
      Mr. Blasucci said he was increasingly willing to unleash his cast for segments without the multicamera setup that has been de rigueur for sketch comedy going back to the 1970s.
      add
  44. nonactors
    • 2007 April 29, Greg Evans, “‘Dragnet’ With Leis, and the Occasional Ghost”, New York Times:
      McGarrett’s lieutenants (Kam Fong as Chin Ho Kelly, Zulu as Kono Kalakaua) offered steady if not always electrifying support, while lesser roles were often filled with local nonactors, lending more diversity than skill.
      add
  45. noncandidate
    • 2007 April 29, Timothy Noah, “Notes From an Ex-Senator”, New York Times:
      On the other hand, Bradley the noncandidate is now willing to recognize as a “potential approach” to the health care crisis what he calls Medicare for All — that is, socialized medicine.
      add
  46. noncrime
    • 2007 April 29, William Safire, “Fall Guy”, New York Times:
      And here’s a Democratic senator saying of Scooter Libby , convicted of lying about what turned out to be an unprosecuted noncrime, agreeing with an outspoken juror that the vice president’s aide had been made “ a fall guy .”
      add
  47. noninnovative
    • 2007 April 29, Rob Walker, “Buzz Factor”, New York Times:
      The company even sent me a photograph of Spykes surrounded by other tiny liquor bottles with names like Blue 100 and 99 Bananas Schnapps to suggest just how thoroughly noninnovative this particular product is.
      add
  48. nonmessengers
    • 2007 April 29, Jocko Weyland, “Unstoppable”, New York Times:
      Messengers are big fixie aficionados, but more and more fixed-gear bikes are being ridden by nonmessengers, most conspicuously the kind of younger people to whom the term “hipster” applies and who emanate from certain neighborhoods in Brooklyn.
      add
  49. nonmortgage
    • 2007 April 29, John Leland, “Turning to Churches or Scripture to Cope With Debt”, New York Times:
      As Americans have run up nonmortgage debt of more than $2.4 trillion, churches and Christian radio stations are supplementing their spiritual counseling with financial counseling, often using programs developed by other Christian organizations and marketed in church circles or over the Internet.
      add
  50. nonrecipient
    • 2007 April 29, Randy Cohen, “Teacher, Jeweler”, New York Times:
      And not the nonrecipient.
      add
  51. nonregulated
  52. oppositional
    • 2007 April 29, Alan Riding, “My Crazy Life”, New York Times:
      “Too lazy and inept to handle the organization that went with oppositional activities,” he writes, “I did not get much involved, especially since political activism started early in the morning — my best time of day — which I never would have considered giving up.
      add
  53. outhitting
    • 2007 April 29, Jeff Z. Klein And Karl-Eric Reif, “These Are the Saves to Remember”, New York Times:
      ¶Further evidence that outhitting your opponent does nothing to increase your chances of winning: In the first playoff round, teams that outhit their opponents by a significant margin (nine or more hits a game) had a record of 7-8.
      add
  54. outraised
    • 2007 April 29, Matt Bai, “The Post-Money Era”, New York Times:
      Ask Howard Dean , who outraised all his 2004 primary opponents and ended up winning one state: his own.
      add
  55. overnighters
    • 2007 April 29, Jennifer Steinhauer, “For $82 a Day, Booking a Cell in a 5-Star Jail”, New York Times:
      Many of the overnighters are granted work furlough, enabling them to do most of their time on the job, returning to the jail simply to go to bed (often following a strip search, which granted is not so five-star).
      add
  56. pluckings
    • 2007 April 29, Ben Ratliff, “Swinging to Beats in the Past and Present Tense”, New York Times:
      There’s the plump, easy swing of the Chocolate Dandies records of 1933, directed by Benny Carter; the extreme toughness of Bessie Smith singing “I’m Down in the Dumps”; the manic energy of Gene Krupa’s Swing Band in 1936; the intensive, percussive authority of Clyde Hart’s piano soloing in Lionel Hampton’s sextet; and Milt Hinton’s hummingbird bass pluckings with Cab Calloway ’s orchestra.
      add
  57. podiatric
    • 2007 April 29, “Shawn Reiser, Sean Orzol”, New York Times:
      She graduated from the University of Michigan and received her degree in podiatric medicine from Temple University .
      add
  58. pouf
    • 2007 April 29, Michael Chabon, “‘Gentlemen of the Road’”, New York Times:
      At first the seeds drifted nearly motionless as milkweed pouf but as they blew nearer they cut long, slow grooves in the water.
      add
  59. pregentrified
    • 2007 April 29, Mireya Navarro, “A Lost New York as Seen From Way Out West”, New York Times:
      So at times does the portrait’s artist, Justin Bua, whose characters are from a world far away in place and time: the pregentrified streets of the Upper West Side of Manhattan in the 1970s and ’80s.
      add
  60. prestart
    • 2007 April 29, Agence France-Presse, “Oracle Loses for First Time but Finishes Round With Lead”, New York Times:
      BMW Oracle Racing seemed to have the prestart advantage after its skipper, Chris Dickson, locked the Kiwis out in front of the line, but the Emirates Team New Zealand skipper, Dean Barker, managed to steer his boat ahead of the Americans.
      add
  61. quotably
    • 2007 April 29, Rob Walker, “Buzz Factor”, New York Times:
      “They make a living preying upon the good nature of reporters like you, who give their cause prominence,” she argues, adding (rather quotably) that they also prey upon “that portion of the population that thinks Prohibition might not have been a bad idea.”
      add
  62. regilding
    • 2007 April 29, Christopher Gray, “A Man Who Minds His P’s and Q’s”, New York Times:
      But subsequent transoms in the series reveal regilding, repainting and mass-produced modern lettering.
      add
  63. renamings
  64. reshufflings
    • 2007 April 29, David Shaftel, “A Borough President Who Wields a Big Broom”, New York Times:
      As they shuffled into an auditorium at St. Vincent’s Hospital Manhattan on West 12th Street, returning members had to meet no fewer than 11 new members, appointed by Borough President Scott Stringer in one of the largest reshufflings of a borough’s community boards in recent memory.
      add
  65. revenging
    • 2007 April 29, Michael Chabon, “‘Gentlemen of the Road’”, New York Times:
      He tucked one end of the carpet under this side of the body, careful not to allow even the tips of his fingernails to brush against the flesh, lest he be pursued through the fogbound eternity of his Wendish ancestors by the misplaced and revenging shade of his master, heaved the great bulk to the floor and rolled the dead emperor up in the Tabriz rug, leaving a long flap at the head and feet to facilitate lifting.
      add
  66. rootedness
    • 2007 April 29, Alan Riding, “My Crazy Life”, New York Times:
      Yes, he had had an image of the fatherland as “the good place,” a place of safety and rootedness.
      add
  67. safarigoers
    • 2007 April 29, Marianne Rohrlich, “The Couple Who Travel Together ...”, New York Times:
      Inspired by safarigoers in South Africa, this rooftop tent fits onto the roof rack of a car and gives you a platform to see anything that comes your way, not only lions or elephants.
      add
  68. shiitakes
    • 2007 April 29, Amanda Hesser, “Stalk of the Town”, New York Times:
      Add the shiitakes, season with salt and sauté until lightly browned and just softened.
      add
  69. snailing
    • 2007 April 29, Joel Brouwer, “Fields of Memory”, New York Times:
      The violin, unpracticed, burned”) and the mischievous rhymes of the poem’s final lines (“the hooks of the waves twist / and desist, twist and insist, / like coats hung out beneath / the snailing clouds to dry”) seem oddly aloof choices given the seriousness of the poem’s inciting incident.
      add
  70. sorries
  71. springhouse
    • 2007 April 29, Michael Chabon, “‘Gentlemen of the Road’”, New York Times:
      At first light, around the time that the body of the kagan — a body that had already begun to manifest decidedly uncorpselike signs of movement — was being carried by an ill-assorted trio into a springhouse near a little-used gate of the Palace through which corpses and those who tended to them traditionally passed, the watch posted atop Qizl caught sight of a scattering of black seeds against the flickering gray of the southern horizon.
      add
  72. stayer
    • 2007 April 29, Jim Squires, “Money for Nothing on Triple Crown Trail”, New York Times:
      Modern medical science can now measure heart and lung capacity and identify the best ratio of short “fast” muscle needed for speed to the long “slow” muscle of the stayer.
      add
  73. subbasement
    • 2007 April 29, Jon Mooallem, “A Disciplined Business”, New York Times:
      At the time the deed transferred in December, the basement pumps had shut off, and the creek that rushes through the armory subbasement had filled the old shooting range with several feet of water.
      add
  74. thrifting
    • 2007 April 29, Ruth La Ferla, “The Pack Rat Who Supplies the Scenic Illusion”, New York Times:
      Chiding himself for his incessant shopping, he explained that the playful Greek hunting scene that hangs above his mantel was unearthed during one of his frequent thrifting trips to upstate New York.
      add
  75. thuggy
    • 2007 April 29, Jeffrey Gettleman, “The Perfect Weapon for the Meanest Wars”, New York Times:
      “These are brutally thuggy people who don’t want to rule politically and have no strategy for winning a war,” Dr. Boothby said.
      add
  76. torrentially
    • 2007 April 29, Tibor Fischer, “Hungarian Graffiti”, New York Times:
      His characters tend to be either laconic or torrentially talkative.
      add
  77. unaged
    • 2007 April 29, Jonathan Miles, “The Real Manhattan”, New York Times:
      Their two-man operation, Tuthilltown Spirits, is based out of a converted granary and 18th-century gristmill in Gardiner, N.Y., near New Paltz, that has so far yielded small artisanal batches of bourbon, vodka and the sort of unaged corn whiskey sometimes referred to as moonshine.
      add
  78. uncallused
    • 2007 April 29, Chip Brown, “The Confessor”, New York Times:
      The injustice of any one unsolved murder probably looms larger in a community where murders are rare, but the cold-case unit informally established in the county sheriff’s office in 2001 owes its existence less to the expressed values of an uncallused electorate than to the zeal and friendship of three retired volunteers: Scott Fischer, Lou Smit and Charlie Hess.
      add
  79. uncorpselike
    • 2007 April 29, Michael Chabon, “‘Gentlemen of the Road’”, New York Times:
      At first light, around the time that the body of the kagan — a body that had already begun to manifest decidedly uncorpselike signs of movement — was being carried by an ill-assorted trio into a springhouse near a little-used gate of the Palace through which corpses and those who tended to them traditionally passed, the watch posted atop Qizl caught sight of a scattering of black seeds against the flickering gray of the southern horizon.
      add
  80. unillusioned
    • 2007 April 29, James Traub, “Who Put the ‘Cold’ in Cold War?”, New York Times:
      Kennan’s unillusioned and often bleak assessment of America’s capacity to shape the world according to its wishes was, save for a brief period at the dawn of the cold war, too harsh a medicine for Washington’s policy makers to swallow.
      add
  81. universalist
    • 2007 April 29, Steve Coates, “Decline and Fall”, New York Times:
      Its “open and composite” governing class promoted a universalist “melting pot” ideology, and the army, Barbero shows, was an assimilation machine, efficiently melding willing barbarians into its multiethnic, multicultural polity.
      add
  82. unjinxing
    • 2007 April 29, Lisa Carver, “Desperado Housewife”, New York Times:
      I guess I thought that by being haphazard and isolated and gloomy, by doing the wedding ceremony all wrong, I was unjinxing the marriage, or at least freeing it up and freeing myself from becoming “a married woman.”
      add
  83. unpretentiousness
    • 2007 April 29, Jesse Green, “Surprising Herself, a Class Act Returns”, New York Times:
      Whether because of her talent, her endurance or her militant unpretentiousness — what reads as hauteur in other English-born actresses reads in her as hausfrau dignity — audiences and critics have accepted her in all kinds of roles in all mediums at all ages.
      add
  84. yahooism
  85. yardwork
    • 2007 April 29, Lois Smith Brady, “Patricia Durkin and Kenneth Wignall”, New York Times:
      After about 12 years together, Ms. Durkin and Mr. Wignall, who continues to operate the beauty products company, still laugh easily, shrug things off easily and say they can overcome most problems by doing yardwork or the dishes.
      add

Sequestered[edit]

  1. intrepreter = interpreter
    • 2007 April 29, Natasha Singer, “Phil Spector’s Greatest Hair”, New York Times:
      With the help of Mr. Warren, an experienced intrepreter of hair trends, we followed the timeline of Mr. Spector’s tonsorial hits and misses.
      add
  2. misblurbing
  3. uncoolth