User:Visviva/NYT 20070506

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This is a list of lowercase non-hyphenated single words found in the 2007-05-06 issue of the New York Times which did not have English entries in the English Wiktionary when this list was created (2009-02-04).

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216826 tokens ‧ 159137 valid lowercase tokens ‧ 14835 types ‧ 134 (~ 0.903%) words before cleaning ‧ 

2007-05-06[edit]

  1. anticommercial
    • 2007 May 6, Benjamin Kunkel, “Stupid and Contagious”, New York Times:
      The one outstanding virtue of True’s book is his close attention to musical politics, especially Cobain’s ambivalent relationship to the puritanically anticommercial, do-it-yourself ethos he discovered among the musicians of Olympia, Wash., where he lived for several years.
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  2. anythings
  3. assistive
    • 2007 May 6, Denise Caruso, “Winning Isn’t Everything. Check the Periphery.”, New York Times:
      This year, some of the student designs that have resulted from the program’s assistive technology courses look so promising that N.Y.U.’s Rusk Institute of Rehabilitative Medicine wants to evaluate them for possible commercial development.
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  4. associational
    • 2007 May 6, “Get Happy”, New York Times:
      As our “central public pleasure,” she contends, shopping allows us to “communicate with each other in the symbolic associational meanings of our ever shifting wardrobes and possessions.”
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  5. basium *
    • 2007 May 6, Paul Vitello, “When a Kiss Is More Than a Kiss”, New York Times:
      (Mr. Ahmadinejad’s was a classic osculum. Mr. Gere’s was probably an osculum playfully masquerading as a basium that, unfortunately for Mr. Gere, may have looked a little too much like a savium on TV.)
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  6. bek *
    • 2007 May 6, Michael Chabon, “‘Gentlemen of the Road’”, New York Times:
      Hour after hour the two men dickered, the bek with his wife at his side, his children squalling or staring in dumb wonder at the Rus. The Northmen sprawled along the wharf like white mountains in bloodstained tunics, encouraging Ragnar Half-Face to turn the greasy Khazar upside down by the ankles and shake him until every last dirham fell out of his pockets.
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  7. bisteeya
    • 2007 May 6, Christine Muhlke, “Book of Revelations”, New York Times:
      We began serving bisteeya, torta rustica — in those days, people hadn’t heard of them.
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  8. bittercress
    • 2007 May 6, Elizabeth Giddens, “Something’s Up With the Violets”, New York Times:
      “The Pennsylvania bittercress has finished flowering, and it’s usually much later,” he said this day.
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  9. boosterized
    • 2007 May 6, “The Older Woman”, New York Times:
      Then it was boosterized by all those people who wrote these stupid books about it.
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  10. bowshot
    • 2007 May 6, Michael Chabon, “‘Gentlemen of the Road’”, New York Times:
      High up on the walls of the city another company of archers looked down, fine marksmen all and as prone to outrage at the scandal of the looting of the elephant, but their grasp of the situation at a bowshot was no doubt limited.
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  11. brutalist
    • 2007 May 6, Dave Kehr, “Old Friends? New Foes? Your Choice”, New York Times:
      Will his love for his childhood sweetheart (Adélaïde Leroux) prove to be enough to have saved him from savagery? Mr. Dumont’s stark, brutalist, sometimes comically literal work puts off many viewers, but he’s one of the few French filmmakers of his generation with a point of view.
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  12. caballitos
    • 2007 May 6, The Associated Press, “In the Waves of Peru, a Sport Isn’t Just for the Swells”, New York Times:
      In fact, fishermen from the beach town of Huanchaco, 300 miles north of Lima, still ride the waves back to shore with the day’s catch on the same long reed kayaks called caballitos, or little horses, used by the Chimu.
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  13. calzones *
    • 2007 May 6, “Eastward Ho”, New York Times:
      This Italian newcomer specializes in wood-oven-baked Sicilian pizzas, flatbreads and calzones.
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  14. charcuteries *
    • 2007 May 6, Craig S. Smith, “Forget Who’ll Win in France. Change Is a Loser.”, New York Times:
      But that has also kept neighborhood bistros and bakers and cheese shops and charcuteries in business far longer than in most other developed economies, creating a rich fabric of daily life that everyone loves.
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  15. cluelessly
    • 2007 May 6, David Browne, “The D.J. Rocked, and TV Shook”, New York Times:
      Rock stars are featured in reality shows and tabloids; previously sacrosanct Led Zeppelin and Nirvana songs are plugged into commercials and soundtracks; “American Idol” has devoted an entire evening to cluelessly sung renditions of British Invasion hits.
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  16. concours *
    • 2007 May 6, Robert Peele, “A Season of Events for Auto Lovers”, New York Times:
      Whether it’s a concours or a swap meet, or some of the world’s most prestigious races, spring brings more than enough activities to keep an auto enthusiast happy — and busy.
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  17. coverstock
    • 2007 May 6, Brendan I. Koerner, “A Bowling Ball With Snap (and Scent)”, New York Times:
      For the Shift’s outer shell, Storm chose a particle coverstock — polyurethane studded with tiny fragments of ceramic or glass — to increase the ball’s grip on oily lanes.
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  18. cusse
    • 2007 May 6, Mary Jo Murphy, “Dear Anne, Not Ready to Kill You Yet”, New York Times:
      But now that I am coming towards you, methinketh my pains be half removed; and also I am right well comforted in so much that my book maketh substantially for my matter; in looking whereof I have spent above four hours this day, which causeth me now to write the shorter letter to you at this time, because of some pain in my head; wishing myself (specially an evening) in my sweetheart’s arms, whose pretty dukkys I trust shortly to cusse.
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  19. disinhibit
    • 2007 May 6, Toni Bentley, “Secrets and Lies”, New York Times:
      To see just how far Ron took revenge, read her collection “Love Trouble,” a compendium of such militant satire and wicked irony that it will disinhibit your serotonin without a prescription.
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  20. distractible
    • 2007 May 6, Kelefa Sanneh, “And Now, a Few Words in Defense of Nostalgia”, New York Times:
      We fans are a flighty, easily distractible, gossipy, hopelessly sentimental bunch; our fondness for reunions only underscores the point.
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  21. drawerful
  22. dukkys
    • 2007 May 6, Mary Jo Murphy, “Dear Anne, Not Ready to Kill You Yet”, New York Times:
      But now that I am coming towards you, methinketh my pains be half removed; and also I am right well comforted in so much that my book maketh substantially for my matter; in looking whereof I have spent above four hours this day, which causeth me now to write the shorter letter to you at this time, because of some pain in my head; wishing myself (specially an evening) in my sweetheart’s arms, whose pretty dukkys I trust shortly to cusse.
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  23. elengeness
    • 2007 May 6, Mary Jo Murphy, “Dear Anne, Not Ready to Kill You Yet”, New York Times:
      Mine own sweetheart, this shall be to advertise you of the great elengeness that I find here since your departing ...
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  24. encoring
    • 2007 May 6, Julie Bosman, “Ah, the Days of Spectacle and Bad Taste”, New York Times:
      “Of course the show was mostly girls and glitter, music and rapid action, but the crowd liked it, welcoming the favorites and encoring everything they did.”
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  25. ethnobotanist
    • 2007 May 6, Diane Johnson, “Sex, Drugs and Hot Tubs”, New York Times:
      (The extraterrestrial, to the amateur ethnobotanist and Esalen stalwart Terence McKenna, represented “the human soul exteriorized into three-dimensional space as a religious experience,” in Kripal’s paraphrase.)
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  26. exteriorized
    • 2007 May 6, Diane Johnson, “Sex, Drugs and Hot Tubs”, New York Times:
      (The extraterrestrial, to the amateur ethnobotanist and Esalen stalwart Terence McKenna, represented “the human soul exteriorized into three-dimensional space as a religious experience,” in Kripal’s paraphrase.)
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  27. extramusical
  28. flagsticks
    • 2007 May 6, Damon Hack, “College Rival Welcomes Another Shot at Woods”, New York Times:
      CHARLOTTE, N.C., May 5 — On the soggy grounds of the Quail Hollow Club, where pine needles gathered in bunches and fans did likewise, a cluster of golfers spent a gray Saturday afternoon stirring up shouts and knocking down flagsticks.
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  29. flyout
  30. goopier
    • 2007 May 6, Susannah Meadows, “Pocahontas II”, New York Times:
      The East River is goopy (or goopier).
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  31. goopy
    • 2007 May 6, Susannah Meadows, “Pocahontas II”, New York Times:
      The East River is goopy (or goopier).
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  32. headphonelike
    • 2007 May 6, Dave Kehr, “Old Friends? New Foes? Your Choice”, New York Times:
      PAPRIKA From one of Japan’s masters of anime, Satoshi Kon , comes a many-layered science fiction tale, built around a headphonelike device that allows scientists to tap into and influence people’s dreams.
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  33. hitless
    • 2007 May 6, Jack Curry, “Wang Keeps Demeanor Calm and Sinker Low”, New York Times:
      “I was kind of hoping that I would be the one to get the hit,” said Suzuki, who was also hitless in three at-bats against Wang.
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  34. hootiness
    • 2007 May 6, Joe Queenan, “Why Not the Worst?”, New York Times:
      And, by virtue of its faux Hellenic inanity and all-purpose Delphic hootiness, it is also a powerful weapon in the hands of those of us who work night and day to resist the tyranny of the good.
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  35. hymned
    • 2007 May 6, The New York Times, “The Week Ahead: May 6 - 12”, New York Times:
      Is paralyzing romantic two-mindedness — the kind Stephen Sondheim hymned as the “God-why-don’t-you-love-me-oh-you-do-I’ll-see-you-later blues” — the same in every culture?
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  36. inchlong
    • 2007 May 6, Susannah Meadows, “Pocahontas II”, New York Times:
      In it a smiling dog gives birth to a string of blind, inchlong puppies through its penis.
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  37. influxes
  38. involvements
    • 2007 May 6, “The Faith of Obama (1 Letter)”, New York Times:
      I hope that there will be as much attention given to the religious sentiments and involvements of the other presidential candidates as there is to Senator Obama’s church affiliation.
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  39. jashivgar
    • 2007 May 6, Michael Chabon, “‘Gentlemen of the Road’”, New York Times:
      For half a day the captain of archers — a jashivgar in the Army of the Khazar with 15 years of service to the candelabrum flag — had suffered, shifting from foot to foot, pulling now at his mustache, now at the fingers of his glove, as the warrior king to whom he had sworn loyalty by oaths so ancient and binding they resisted even the power of the autumnal Disavowal haggled and pleaded for the safety of the house of Buljan with a barbarous swaggering Rus butcher whom the vicissitudes of the plunderous life had left only half a face.
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  40. kaganate
    • 2007 May 6, Michael Chabon, “‘Gentlemen of the Road’”, New York Times:
      When the captain had last seen the beast she was caparisoned and painted like a whore at carnival, but now she came wearing nothing but the rich gray terrain of her hide, scarred and dignified and so replete with power in the shifting under the skin of her monstrous musculature that she seemed to the captain to embody the antiquity and might of the kaganate — and in her imminent journey from the embankment to the barge that stood waiting to tow her up the river to the home of the Northmen, where she would surely perish in the cold and the dark, that empire’s passing.
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  41. kvetcher
    • 2007 May 6, Tom Carson, “Mr. Bad Example”, New York Times:
      After all, Parker doesn’t belong to literature so much as she plays the part of our fantasy kvetcher and aspirant rolled into one.
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  42. lamby
    • 2007 May 6, “Eastward Ho”, New York Times:
      The resulting sausages, incorporated into various dishes or grilled on their own, are plump torpedoes of lamby goodness, aggressively and expertly spiced.
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  43. loserdom
    • 2007 May 6, Sharon Waxman, “Giving the Last Laugh to Life’s Losers”, New York Times:
      But “Knocked Up,” whose main promotional image is a close-up of Seth Rogen as the pudgy, pot-smoking, porn-addled, job-free hero of the tale, Ben, may well take its celebration of American schlubitude (loserdom? schlemieliness?) to a new level.
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  44. losingest
    • 2007 May 6, Dave Kehr, “August”, New York Times:
      THE COMEBACKS The losingest college football coach in recorded history (David Koechner) assembles a new team of misfits and losers, hoping for the best.
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  45. mastman
  46. methedrine
    • 2007 May 6, Toni Bentley, “Secrets and Lies”, New York Times:
      Back in the States, Geng is soon on the lam in San Francisco for hot-wiring and crashing a car with a friend while high on methedrine.
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  47. mezuzahs
    • 2007 May 6, Joyce Cohen, “A Crystal Ball Would Have Been Nice”, New York Times:
      At the walk-through, the sellers said they would be leaving mezuzahs, or cases of scriptural scrolls that indicate God’s presence, on the doorposts, as required by Jewish law when a Jewish family moves in.
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  48. microtrend
    • 2007 May 6, Guy Trebay, “Gay Art: A Movement, or at Least a Moment”, New York Times:
      MAYBE it doesn’t signal the arrival of a major arts movement and maybe it is just a symptom of another consumer-driven microtrend, but it would seem that something is afoot in the contemporary art world and it concerns what you could call, for lack of more comprehensive terminology, a burgeoning of gay male art.
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  49. midlifer
    • 2007 May 6, William Safire, “Halfway Humanity”, New York Times:
      As a vigorous, mature midlifer, you own your vocabulary; it doesn’t own you.
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  50. midster
    • 2007 May 6, William Safire, “Halfway Humanity”, New York Times:
      A better possibility is built on oldster, which was coined on the analogy of youngster; that suggests the future development of midster, though its confusion with mister would pose a pronunciation problem.
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  51. minicamp
    • 2007 May 6, The Associated Press, “Sports Briefing”, New York Times:
      The team said it would decide after this weekend whether to sign Gatlin and bring him back for the club’s next minicamp.
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  52. molassesed
    • 2007 May 6, Susannah Meadows, “Pocahontas II”, New York Times:
      “The smoked air of the great hall by now had molassesed my brain.”
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  53. neuroplasticity
    • 2007 May 6, Rob Walker, “Muscular Metaphor”, New York Times:
      Recent research in the field of neuroplasticity (the ability of the brain to change with determined effort), some of it by Merzenich, has fueled this trend; the Posit Science Web site is crammed with research backing the company’s approach.
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  54. nonaficionados
    • 2007 May 6, Anne Midgette, “Home in the Range? Who Can Sing What”, New York Times:
      The horror-stricken warnings of opera purists about the perils of singing roles too large for one’s voice may make nonaficionados only more eager to stir things up.
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  55. nondeaf
    • 2007 May 6, The New York Times, “The Week Ahead: May 6 - 12”, New York Times:
      Two voice actors will be on hand to interpret for nondeaf audience members.
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  56. nondrafted
  57. nonenvironmentally
    • 2007 May 6, Susannah Meadows, “Pocahontas II”, New York Times:
      Gluttonous, warmongering, nonenvironmentally conscious bad.
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  58. nonheavyweight
  59. nonriders
  60. operagoers
    • 2007 May 6, Anthony Tommasini, “At City Opera, an Innovator Bows Out”, New York Times:
      Early in this process he convinced many operagoers, including me, that the biggest impediment to the City Opera was its location: an auditorium designed for dance, situated in the shadow of the intimidating Metropolitan Opera House.
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  61. oropharynx
    • 2007 May 6, Lisa Sanders, M.D., “A Nervous Case”, New York Times:
      He snaked the flexible endoscope into the patient’s nose, through the oropharynx and then down his throat.
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  62. outpitched
  63. overinflated
    • 2007 May 6, Manohla Dargis, “Defending Goliath: Hollywood and the Art of the Blockbuster”, New York Times:
      Critics, including, yes, yours truly, often use blockbuster as easy (too easy) shorthand for overinflated productions that rely more on special effects than words and characters, and that distract rather than engage the audience.
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  64. overreporting
    • 2007 May 6, Penelope Green, “Mad, Mad Magazine”, New York Times:
      Gruner & Jahr sued for breach of contract, Rosie countersued and a judge ruled in favor of no one, though during the trial it was revealed that Gruner & Jahr had doctored the magazine’s newsstand sales, overreporting the figures.
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  65. paunchiness
    • 2007 May 6, William Safire, “Halfway Humanity”, New York Times:
      That’s because the noun, by virtue of its use as a hyphenated compound adjective in middle-age spread, creates nail-nibbling self-doubt amid visions of muffin-top midriffs and the realization that paunchiness precludes raunchiness.
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  66. philematologists
    • 2007 May 6, Paul Vitello, “When a Kiss Is More Than a Kiss”, New York Times:
      But anthropologists and philematologists (people who study kissing) say the harsh reactions to Mr. Ahmadinejad’s and Mr. Gere’s kisses underline a certain cultural and political mystery about the seemingly simple act of kissing.
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  67. physiatrist
    • 2007 May 6, “Helena Yu and Anthony Yu”, New York Times:
      The bridegroom’s mother is a medical technologist in a chemistry laboratory at Winthrop-University Hospital in Mineola, N.Y. His father, a physiatrist, retired as the assistant chief of physical medicine and rehabilitation at the Veterans Affairs Medical Center in Chillicothe, Ohio.
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  68. pinscher
    • 2007 May 6, The Associated Press, “After 9 Die in Kansas, a New Wave of Tornadoes”, New York Times:
      Even with that heads-up, Frank Gallant said he had no place to go. Mr. Gallant, who uses a wheelchair, moved to the center of his house with his miniature pinscher, No. 5.
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  69. pintxos
    • 2007 May 6, “Eastward Ho”, New York Times:
      This popular place has a homey feel and a lot of snacks (called pintxos) for remarkably reasonable prices.
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  70. plunderous
    • 2007 May 6, Michael Chabon, “‘Gentlemen of the Road’”, New York Times:
      For half a day the captain of archers — a jashivgar in the Army of the Khazar with 15 years of service to the candelabrum flag — had suffered, shifting from foot to foot, pulling now at his mustache, now at the fingers of his glove, as the warrior king to whom he had sworn loyalty by oaths so ancient and binding they resisted even the power of the autumnal Disavowal haggled and pleaded for the safety of the house of Buljan with a barbarous swaggering Rus butcher whom the vicissitudes of the plunderous life had left only half a face.
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  71. poisonousness
  72. postperformance
    • 2007 May 6, The New York Times, “The Week Ahead: May 6 - 12”, New York Times:
      In an unusual collaboration the WENDY OSSERMAN DANCE COMPANY will dance amid the exhibition “Fairy Tales,” a photographic series by MIWA YANAGI at the Chelsea Art Museum. Ms. Osserman’s “Disguised” will explore themes in Ms. Yanagi’s photographs, and the intriguing question of musical and physical responses to visual art will be the subject of a postperformance discussion.
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  73. prankishly
    • 2007 May 6, Tom Carson, “Mr. Bad Example”, New York Times:
      At least until the making of “The Wind,” when this prankishly death-obsessed songwriter movingly tested his mettle against the real thing.
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  74. pregrill
    • 2007 May 6, Richard Sandomir, “Worshiping at the Altar of Pay-Per-View”, New York Times:
      It was reasonable to assume, or pray, that if the Holyfield-Buster Douglas bout a few months earlier could attract 1.06 million buys, then one starring Holyfield and Foreman, the popular pregrill preacher in the midst of an improbable comeback as a chubby pugilist, would do better.
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  75. primitivism
    • 2007 May 6, The New York Times, “The Week Ahead: May 6 - 12”, New York Times:
      In so doing, he opened a universe of savagery and primitivism.
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  76. princeling
    • 2007 May 6, Dave Kehr, “July”, New York Times:
      HARRY POTTER AND THE ORDER OF THE PHOENIX It’s Harry’s fifth year at Hogwarts (already!) and the princeling wizard must confront both a renewed threat from the evil Lord Voldemort (Ralph Fiennes ) and an outbreak of academic rivalry among the staff.
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  77. protofeminist
    • 2007 May 6, Julia Scheeres, “Promiscuities”, New York Times:
      Trapped between two eras, Kate is both a prototypical 1950s woman, measuring her self-worth by the status of her male companions, and a protofeminist who freely indulges her carnal desires.
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  78. psychopharmacological
    • 2007 May 6, Diane Johnson, “Sex, Drugs and Hot Tubs”, New York Times:
      Though the first experiments with LSD were conducted at respectable universities like the University of California , Los Angeles, Esalen was famously a laboratory for the psychopharmacological inquiries of the period.
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  79. pulpish
    • 2007 May 6, Charles Mcgrath, “A Prince of Pulp, Legit at Last”, New York Times:
      Part of why Mr. Dick’s work appeals so much to moviemakers is his pulpish sensibility.
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  80. railyards
    • 2007 May 6, Sam Lubell, “Paris Gives Itself a Futuristic Transplant”, New York Times:
      The project won city approval in 1991 after the city signed off on the construction of a large deck for development over the Gare d’Austerlitz station’s railyards and most of the mills and factories in the neighborhood had pulled out of town.
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  81. reconstitutional
    • 2007 May 6, Kelefa Sanneh, “And Now, a Few Words in Defense of Nostalgia”, New York Times:
      Fans of punk and postpunk once thought of themselves as different, but the current reconstitutional convention makes it clear that Pixies fans aren’t so different from Fleetwood Mac fans (except that, as Ben noted, the Pixies 2.0 are probably more popular than the original band was).
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  82. rhapsodically
    • 2007 May 6, Alex Williams, “Vivaldi Arrives Fashionably Late”, New York Times:
      Her design partner, Keren Craig, spoke rhapsodically about the first time she saw “Tosca” at age 11.
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  83. rugelach
    • 2007 May 6, Jeff Vandam, “A Generation of Strivers Sits for Its Portrait”, New York Times:
      They had met up in the past, of course, sharing rugelach on a walk through the neighborhood or chatting across the world on the phone, but Monday night was different.
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  84. runup
  85. savium
    • 2007 May 6, Paul Vitello, “When a Kiss Is More Than a Kiss”, New York Times:
      (Mr. Ahmadinejad’s was a classic osculum. Mr. Gere’s was probably an osculum playfully masquerading as a basium that, unfortunately for Mr. Gere, may have looked a little too much like a savium on TV.)
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  86. sharptonguedness
    • 2007 May 6, Michael Chabon, “‘Gentlemen of the Road’”, New York Times:
      The captain of archers fidgeted and coughed and rolled his eyes at his men, as if such cupidity and dishonor were an inevitable but minor aspect of the human predicament akin to sharptonguedness in a wife, but felt a hot needle of outrage sounding his belly.
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  87. smirkiness
    • 2007 May 6, A. O. Scott, “Why the Movies Keep Digging Into TV’s Bottomless Dustbin”, New York Times:
      In the movies, though, that mild, occasionally thrilling sense of subversion is betrayed not only by the overblown scale but also by a tone of vulgar smirkiness that makes the grown-ups feel smarter than they should and the kids feel dumber than they need to.
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  88. sopas
    • 2007 May 6, Tim Murphy, “Immigrants’ Hopes, and Their Fears, Change a Westchester Town”, New York Times:
      In their new cafe, full of simple, blond-wood tables and chairs, the couple hopes to serve the town’s sizable Latino immigrant population, as well as its more established non-Latino population, such Latin American staples as tacos, quesadillas, sopas (soups) and Guatemala-style tamales.
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  89. spastically
    • 2007 May 6, “The Future of P.E. (2 Letters)”, New York Times:
      Although I understand that it must be hard for gym teachers to stimulate an increasingly tech-dependent and inactive generation, I don’t know what children and young adults are expected to take away from staring at a TV screen and spastically moving their feet.
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  90. spydom
    • 2007 May 6, Glenn Dixon, “Busted at the Regal”, New York Times:
      We were seconds away from making it all the way through “Breach,” a five-hour picture about precisely how dull it is to catch one of the biggest moles in the history of spydom without submarine cars or ballpoint-pen lasers or any of the other usual tools of the trade.
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  91. strawberrylike
    • 2007 May 6, Howard G. Goldberg, “Alternatives That Sparkle”, New York Times:
      The brisk, salmon-colored crémant rosé, fully pinot noir and strawberrylike, costs $18 at Pour, which opened in December at 321 Amsterdam Avenue (75th Street).
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  92. stultifyingly
    • 2007 May 6, Sharon Waxman, “Matchmakers Know Superstars Need Love, Too”, New York Times:
      And sometimes the choices seem stultifyingly narrow: Vince Vaughn , Jennifer Aniston , Reese Witherspoon , Kevin Federline, Jessica Simpson , Paris Hilton .
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  93. subfloor
  94. superassassin
    • 2007 May 6, Karen Durbin, “How to Leap Into Fame and Keep Your Head”, New York Times:
      His next project, scheduled to start shooting in Prague this month, is the fantasy action-adventure “Wanted,” in which Mr. McAvoy plays a onetime wimp who becomes a secret superassassin under the tutelage of Morgan Freeman and Angelina Jolie .
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  95. supercolossus
    • 2007 May 6, Manohla Dargis, “Defending Goliath: Hollywood and the Art of the Blockbuster”, New York Times:
      In the 1950s the faltering movie industry went into the business of the supercolossus, delivering epic-size stories on ever-widening big screens in part to distinguish itself from that small-screen menace called television.
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  96. supercrunchy
    • 2007 May 6, David Colman, “One Plate the Ceramist Doesn’t Throw”, New York Times:
      Mr. Silverman has since gotten out of X-Large and started throwing and showing a line of supercrunchy ceramics, Atwater Pottery, named after his Los Angeles neighborhood.
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  97. superugly
  98. superwelterweight
    • 2007 May 6, Richard Sandomir, “Mayweather Wins Decision Over De La Hoya”, New York Times:
      LAS VEGAS, May 5 — Floyd Mayweather Jr. had just defeated Oscar De La Hoya in their superwelterweight title bout in a split decision Saturday night when a controversy threatened to delay, if not upend, his victory.
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  99. symmetrists
  100. tarkhan
    • 2007 May 6, Michael Chabon, “‘Gentlemen of the Road’”, New York Times:
      The tarkhan, leader of the Khazar army, meets Amram, Zelikman and a green-eyed young person who claims to be Alp, the brother of Filaq.
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  101. tipoff
  102. tonsillar
    • 2007 May 6, Lisa Sanders, M.D., “A Nervous Case”, New York Times:
      So can a tonsillar abscess.
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  103. trackman
  104. ultratraditional
    • 2007 May 6, Michael Slackman, “The (Not So) Eagerly Modern Saudi”, New York Times:
      SAUDI ARABIA, home of Islam’s holiest sites, flush with oil revenue, and increasingly the most influential player among Arab countries, has long resisted changing its ultratraditional ways.
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  105. unrelievedly
    • 2007 May 6, “An Extra Story”, New York Times:
      Fernanda Eberstadt, writing about Carmen Laforet’s post-Spanish Civil War novel, “Nada” (April 15), remarks that “the idea that there might be a lone woman in what seems the unrelievedly male pantheon of Spanish novelists of the post-Civil War era ... was like discovering an extra story built in a house you thought you knew.”
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  106. unsentimentally
    • 2007 May 6, George Prochnik, “Hail to the Analysand”, New York Times:
      But what Freud did believe was that governments — like individuals — must strive to examine and to acknowledge as clearly and unsentimentally as possible the motivations behind policy.
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  107. untroubling
    • 2007 May 6, Conrad De Aenlle, “When Words Speak Louder Than Actions”, New York Times:
      Any softening of the statement’s language should help stocks, Mr. Herrmann said, because it would convince traders that the Fed will remain untroubled and untroubling.
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  108. usefulism
  109. whens
    • 2007 May 6, Danielle Trussoni, “Bad Behavior Within Reason”, New York Times:
      There is not much psychological examination, no ifs, whens or whys about the waves of love and anger seething through Lucy’s.
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Sequestered[edit]

  1. clownwear
    • 2007 May 6, Charles Mcgrath, “A Prince of Pulp, Legit at Last”, New York Times:
      Except for the odd hovercar or rocket ship, there aren’t many gizmos in his fiction, and many of his details are satiric, like the household appliances in “Ubik” that demand to be fed with coins all the time, or put-ons, like the bizarre clownwear that is apparently standard office garb in the same book (which is set in 1992, by the way; so much for Dick the prophet): “natty birch-bark pantaloons, hemp-rope belt, peekaboo see-through top, and train engineer’s tall hat.”
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  2. eeeevil
    • 2007 May 6, Susannah Meadows, “Pocahontas II”, New York Times:
      War for oil = bad; corporations = eeeevil.
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  3. noncommital = noncommittal
    • 2007 May 6, Eric Ormsby, “From Arabic to Hebrew”, New York Times:
      Only 13 of Dunash’s poems survive, along with one by his wife (whose name is lost), and it seems improbable that out of such feeble stuff — Sa’adia was right to be noncommital — a poetic renaissance might take flight.
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  4. protoblockbusters
  5. schlemieliness
    • 2007 May 6, Sharon Waxman, “Giving the Last Laugh to Life’s Losers”, New York Times:
      But “Knocked Up,” whose main promotional image is a close-up of Seth Rogen as the pudgy, pot-smoking, porn-addled, job-free hero of the tale, Ben, may well take its celebration of American schlubitude (loserdom? schlemieliness?) to a new level.
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  6. schlubitude
    • 2007 May 6, Sharon Waxman, “Giving the Last Laugh to Life’s Losers”, New York Times:
      But “Knocked Up,” whose main promotional image is a close-up of Seth Rogen as the pudgy, pot-smoking, porn-addled, job-free hero of the tale, Ben, may well take its celebration of American schlubitude (loserdom? schlemieliness?) to a new level.
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