User:Visviva/NYT 20070520

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This is a list of lowercase non-hyphenated single words found in the 2007-05-20 issue of the New York Times which did not have English entries in the English Wiktionary when this list was created (2009-02-04).

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179939 tokens ‧ 132935 valid lowercase tokens ‧ 13353 types ‧ 89 (~ 0.667%) words before cleaning ‧ 

2007-05-20[edit]

  1. afterguard
  2. anticompetitive
    • 2007 May 20, “Letters”, New York Times:
      Re “Young Lawyers Sue, and Little Changes” (Feb. 25), which described the tentative settlement of a class-action lawsuit in which BAR/BRI, the bar review company, was accused of illegal, unethical and anticompetitive acts:
      add
  3. anticonformity
    • 2007 May 20, Ruth La Ferla, “The Once and Future Pee-wee”, New York Times:
      Mr. Reubens remains the hero of legions of post-adolescents and their parents, who recall him as an anarchic imp, a shrewd merchant of anticonformity.
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  4. beachbound
    • 2007 May 20, Ben Gibberd, “For the Mugs of Brooklyn, the Bus to Bling”, New York Times:
      The service, which consists of just one beachbound bus on Fridays and one return bus on Sunday evenings, is part of a trial run, operated by Hampton Jitney through the end of the summer.
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  5. bladelike
    • 2007 May 20, Jim Lewis, “The Native Builder”, New York Times:
      From the outside, it seemed to float slightly above the land, like a metallic dragonfly, and when I walked down the hill a ways and looked back, it seemed to have disappeared to a bladelike presence.
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  6. breakbone
    • 2007 May 20, Joshua Kurlantzick, “Sometimes, Sightseeing Is a Look at Your X-Rays”, New York Times:
      Surrounded by a gaggle of nurses ready to care for my every complaint at any time of day, the doctor informed me, “We’re pretty sure you have dengue fever,” referring to a dangerous tropical disease also known as breakbone fever.
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  7. cavatappi *
    • 2007 May 20, Devan Sipher, “Alexandra Guarnaschelli and Brandon Clark”, New York Times:
      Afterward, friends, family and fellow chefs gathered upstairs in the barrel-shaped dining room, where they feasted on the bride’s creations, including Kobe beef empanadas with salsa, cavatappi pasta in a yellow tomato sauce, and roasted beef with those quiver-inducing fresh ramps.
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  8. ceanothus
    • 2007 May 20, Edward Lewine, “Hollywood and Green”, New York Times:
      I now have drought-tolerant California plants like lavender and ceanothus.
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  9. cinderblocks
  10. collectibility
    • 2007 May 20, Jerry Garrett, “Fifty, Finned and Fabulous”, New York Times:
      The enduring popularity, not to mention collectibility, of Chevrolet’s 1957 cars “speaks for itself,” he said, adding, “The ’57 Chevy was quite simply the best-looking car of the entire postwar era.”
      add
  11. commandingly
    • 2007 May 20, Nate Chinen, “Abbey Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation”, New York Times:
      Her songs are almost certainly her proudest achievement, an impression she reinforces by quoting them liberally, and commandingly, in conversation.
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  12. creaturely
    • 2007 May 20, Charles Siebert, “Falling Down Green”, New York Times:
      Thus, over the years, all of those creaturely encroachments that a house is designed to keep at bay were allowed to advance.
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  13. dramaturgical
    • 2007 May 20, Sally Mcgrane, “An Actor Out Standing in His Field”, New York Times:
      Julia Hart, the coordinator for the unusual project, responded that it was a dramaturgical decision to have Mr. Barlow mark the whole field before he started planting. Mr. Schlestein shook his head, saying: “The rain comes Monday.
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  14. electrolyzer
    • 2007 May 20, Mark Svenvold, “The Zero-Energy Solution”, New York Times:
      Almost everything I saw, Strizki explained, was overengineered and bigger than necessary for the job: the electrolyzer, used in industrial laboratories to generate hydrogen; the fuel cell, used by telecom companies to power remote cellphone towers; and, most conspicuously, the 10 hydrogen tanks.
      add
  15. elucidator
    • 2007 May 20, Melena Ryzik, “Nearly 60 Years and Counting, Working on the Art of Theater”, New York Times:
      “This would be a very good thing, if the theater took itself seriously as a factory of thought, an elucidator of social conscience, an armory against despair and dullness, and a temple of the ascent of man.”
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  16. fraulein
    • 2007 May 20, “A Coastline Smorgasbord”, New York Times:
      Waiters are in button-downs, and waitresses wear full-on fraulein garb.
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  17. gamelike
  18. gators
    • 2007 May 20, The Associated Press, “Ocean Course Is Back. Hold On to Your Hats.”, New York Times:
      It plays host to about 20,000 rounds of golf a year — and to the gators that skim its brackish waterways along with stalking marsh birds and drowned Titleists.
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  19. greenward
    • 2007 May 20, Charles Siebert, “Falling Down Green”, New York Times:
      But it was in the immediate numinous aftermath of that predawn visit that I first saw the next, final stage of our haplessly greenward collapse.
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  20. hangarlike
    • 2007 May 20, Randy Kennedy, “Sculpture (and Nerves) of Steel”, New York Times:
      This anecdote about artistic ritual, related in the catalog for Mr. Serra’s monumental 40-year sculpture retrospective opening June 3 at the Museum of Modern Art, may help explain why Mr. Serra, suffering from a nasty fever and sore throat, could be found early one April morning in a hangarlike open space in the museum.
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  21. hayground
    • 2007 May 20, Verlyn Klinkenborg, “The Scent of Lilacs”, New York Times:
      The snow on the nearby buttes — the gift of late April — has finally melted, and the creek bottoms and pastures and hayground are an unhoped-for green.
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  22. immunohematologist
    • 2007 May 20, “Christine Szretter, Allen Gelb”, New York Times:
      The bridegroom, 75, retired as a consulting immunohematologist in Manhattan, serving as an expert witness in paternity cases.
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  23. incentivization
    • 2007 May 20, “Quality Control in Health Care (3 Letters)”, New York Times:
      It’s about time that the sleeping giant (the health care industry) wakes up, smells the coffee and learns from other giants (like the manufacturing industry): process improvement, incentivization and healthy competition are drivers of change to control costs in the current health care system.
      add
  24. interdictions
    • 2007 May 20, David E. Sanger, “U.S. Pays Pakistan to Fight Terror, but Patrols Ebb”, New York Times:
      The administration told Congress in January that the Pakistanis performed operations that “would be difficult for U.S. Armed Forces to attain,” and the Pentagon said those included carrying out joint operations, commanding observation posts and conducting land and maritime interdictions.
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  25. interleague
    • 2007 May 20, Jack Curry, “Mlicki Still Savors Success Against Yanks”, New York Times:
      Not only did Mlicki get the chance, he was the Mets’ starting pitcher in the first interleague game between the two New York teams and produced the best outing of his career: a complete-game 6-0 victory.
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  26. kamut *
    • 2007 May 20, Amanda Hesser, “Flour Power”, New York Times:
      There are apple-miso muffins containing spelt and kamut, ginger yogurt scones and “what’s your carbon footprint? cookies” in butter and chocolate.
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  27. katsura
    • 2007 May 20, Jennifer Bleyer, “Trees They Want, but No Boys Allowed”, New York Times:
      Those are the katsura, the Kentucky coffee, the hardy rubber, the ginkgo, the European ash and the green ash trees, few if any of which are being planted in the South Bronx.
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  28. kerflooey
  29. leukodystrophy
    • 2007 May 20, Pete Thamel, “Duke Lacrosse Is Focal Point Again, This Time for the Good”, New York Times:
      The time at the Ronald McDonald House made a fan out of Rich and Kim Behnken, from Howell, N.J. The Behnkens were there with their 2-year-old daughter, Reese, who has a rare and incurable genetic disease, metachromatic leukodystrophy.
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  30. mammifers
    • 2007 May 20, Mary Jo Murphy, “My Dear Fellow Species”, New York Times:
      I was so struck with distribution of Galapagos organisms &c &c & with the character of the American fossil mammifers, &c &c that I determined to collect blindly every sort of fact, which cd bear any way on what are species.
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  31. mayhemic
    • 2007 May 20, Jaime Wolf, “Le Cinéma du Blockbuster”, New York Times:
      In the United States, Mr. Besson is primarily known as a superior director of stylish, mayhemic, even soulful films like “La Femme Nikita” and “Léon: The Professional.”
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  32. megabudget
    • 2007 May 20, Jaime Wolf, “Le Cinéma du Blockbuster”, New York Times:
      In subsequent films Mr. Besson realized his ambition to meld visionary, megabudget Hollywood-style spectacle to French sensibility.
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  33. megaresorts
    • 2007 May 20, Ron Stodghill, “Who Controls Paradise?”, New York Times:
      At the same time, analysts say he is certain to face pressure from Mexico’s powerful tourism industry, which generates billions of dollars in revenue for the country but has also caused once-scenic coastlines to become clotted with megaresorts.
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  34. mepivacaine
    • 2007 May 20, Bill Finley, “Curlin’s Feat Lifts Asmussen to Top Echelon of Racing”, New York Times:
      Asmussen was well on his way to another record year last year when he was suspended six months after a horse he trained tested positive for the illegal medication mepivacaine, an anesthetic.
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  35. mercado *
    • 2007 May 20, Amy Cortese, “At the Mall, Mariachi Instead of Muzak”, New York Times:
      At Plaza Fiesta in Atlanta, there is a six-month wait for spots in the mercado, and management is considering expanding the space to accommodate more vendors.
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  36. metachromatic
    • 2007 May 20, Pete Thamel, “Duke Lacrosse Is Focal Point Again, This Time for the Good”, New York Times:
      The time at the Ronald McDonald House made a fan out of Rich and Kim Behnken, from Howell, N.J. The Behnkens were there with their 2-year-old daughter, Reese, who has a rare and incurable genetic disease, metachromatic leukodystrophy.
      add
  37. microgrin
    • 2007 May 20, James Traub, “Al Gore Has Big Plans”, New York Times:
      Every minute or so he flashed a microgrin at a passer-by without interrupting his oratorical flow.
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  38. microminiatures
    • 2007 May 20, William Grimes, “Catching Up on a Little Light Reading”, New York Times:
      In descending order, collectors categorize such books as macrominiatures (three to four inches in height), miniatures (one to three inches), microminiatures (one quarter-inch to one inch) and the greatest of the least, the ultramicrominiatures (less than one-quarter inch).
      add
  39. microparticulars
    • 2007 May 20, Mark Svenvold, “The Zero-Energy Solution”, New York Times:
      Back outside, Strizki, who is built like a bowling ball closing in on a strike, began a well-practiced patter that sprang readily from the microparticulars of photovoltaic cells and proton-exchange membranes to what he sees as the macro-, going-to-hell-in-a-handbasket range of problems that beset the globe: staggering energy demand in the face of diminishing resources; global warming ; peaking fossil-fuel production; energy insecurity; and the specter of economic collapse as the world makes the painful shift from petroleum to whatever must, of necessity, come next.
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  40. midengine
    • 2007 May 20, Ezra Dyer, “Growling at the Exotics’ Door”, New York Times:
      The R8’s midengine design echoes that of Audi’s dominant R8 racecar, which racked up 62 wins in 79 starts.
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  41. minicamp
  42. multiblock
    • 2007 May 20, C. J. Hughes, “Home of the Bronx Roar”, New York Times:
      For some, the attraction may be the new Yankee Stadium, a billion-dollar multiblock public-private behemoth whose curved bleachers are even now rising across East 161st Street from its older cousin.
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  43. nondonors
  44. nonpolluters
    • 2007 May 20, Arthur Lubow, “The Road to Curitiba”, New York Times:
      In the early 1970s, when Brazil was welcoming any industry, no matter how toxic its byproducts, Curitiba decided to admit only nonpolluters; to accommodate them, it constructed an industrial district that reserved so much land for green space that it was derided as a “golf course” until it succeeded in filling up with major businesses while its counterparts in other Latin American cities were flagging.
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  45. overengineered
    • 2007 May 20, Mark Svenvold, “The Zero-Energy Solution”, New York Times:
      Almost everything I saw, Strizki explained, was overengineered and bigger than necessary for the job: the electrolyzer, used in industrial laboratories to generate hydrogen; the fuel cell, used by telecom companies to power remote cellphone towers; and, most conspicuously, the 10 hydrogen tanks.
      add
  46. pillared
    • 2007 May 20, James Traub, “Al Gore Has Big Plans”, New York Times:
      The Gores live in a whitewashed neoclassical mansion with a pillared portico in the ritzy Nashville neighborhood of Belle Meade.
      add
  47. pixielike
    • 2007 May 20, Dave Kehr, “Anime Dreams, Transformed Into Nightmares”, New York Times:
      But when four of the prototype devices are stolen, a wave of madness breaks out among the research crew and slowly spreads into the Japanese population. Dr. Chiba joins a thoroughly rational policeman, Detective Konakawa, to track down the mysterious malefactor who is holding the sanity of Japan in his hands; they are joined in their quest by the title character, a pixielike redhead (drawn in a more traditional, wide-eyed anime style than the rest of the cast) who acts as a dream guide and trip doctor for those undergoing DC therapy.
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  48. postpresidential
    • 2007 May 20, Patrick Healy, “Clinton Accepts Aid From a Divisive Figure”, New York Times:
      At the University of New Hampshire, meanwhile, the two former presidents recalled their collaboration raising and disbursing more than $115 million for Hurricane Katrina relief efforts, and they also reveled in their postpresidential friendship.
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  49. prestart
  50. recladding
    • 2007 May 20, Suzanne Slesin, “Two Opposites, Neither Perfect”, New York Times:
      “We’re bringing back the early storefronts with their curved glass, recladding the copper roof and repairing and replacing the terra cotta, stone and brick details of the Beaux-Arts facade that have not been there for 75 years,” said Nancy Ruddy, a partner in the architectural firm.
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  51. reflectiveness
    • 2007 May 20, “Letters”, New York Times:
      They defined wisdom as a happy marriage between reflectiveness and judgment.
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  52. ridable
    • 2007 May 20, Terrence Rafferty, “Building the Duke, Film by Film”, New York Times:
      The home-video outfits that control most of the Wayne catalog have been furiously clearing their vaults, repackaging and gift-boxing previously released films, and preparing DVDs of the “special,” “deluxe” and “collector’s” variety, in an effort to catch what might be the last ridable wave of Dukemania in our lifetimes.
      add
  53. runnings
    • 2007 May 20, Frank Litsky, “Sports Briefing”, New York Times:
      Craig Mottram of Australia, who won this race in its two previous runnings, finished second in 28:25.
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  54. semidetached
    • 2007 May 20, Jim Lewis, “The Native Builder”, New York Times:
      He works out of a neat semidetached house in a suburb northeast of Sydney, with no one to keep him company except his wife, Wendy Lewin, who collaborates with him on some projects but otherwise pursues her own architecture career at a drawing table right next to his.
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  55. semimythological
    • 2007 May 20, Terrence Rafferty, “Building the Duke, Film by Film”, New York Times:
      It’s a perfect setting for a fantastic, semimythological creature like the Duke to cavort in.
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  56. semiserious
  57. sideblades
    • 2007 May 20, Ezra Dyer, “Growling at the Exotics’ Door”, New York Times:
      My test car also had enhanced leather ($5,500), a navigation system ($2,000), a 465-watt Bang & Olufsen sound system ($1,800), metallic paint ($650) and carbon fiber sideblades ($2,000).
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  58. situationally
    • 2007 May 20, “Letters”, New York Times:
      There is a big difference between a situationally stressed depression (relating to, in Bruce Stutz’s case, his father’s death, marriage failing, financial problems, lost job) and intractable lifelong sentences to hell and therapy because of major depression, bipolar illness or other conditions.
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  59. sloganed
    • 2007 May 20, Joanna Kavenna, “While You Were Out”, New York Times:
      Scottie, a precocious 10-year old, wears provocatively sloganed T-shirts and harasses her peers by text message.
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  60. stalwartly
    • 2007 May 20, Jon Pareles, “Bois Sec Ardoin, Musician and Nurturer of Creole Tradition, Dies at 91”, New York Times:
      Alphonse Ardoin, a Louisiana Creole accordionist and singer nicknamed Bois Sec whose music stalwartly sustained South Louisiana tradition, died Wednesday of natural causes in Eunice, La., where he had been living in a nursing home, said his son Morris.
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  61. stingingly
    • 2007 May 20, Brent Staples, “Visible Man”, New York Times:
      By the 1970s, he had evolved, or declined, into what one of those successors, Toni Morrison , stingingly described as “a black literary patrician.”
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  62. supergeeky
    • 2007 May 20, Anthony Ramirez, “Looking at the Subway From Every Angle”, New York Times:
      “Being interested in trains seems to be like a supergeeky kind of thing, and kind of a boy’s thing,” said Hadassah Max, 30, laughing.
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  63. tangoers
  64. thermopane
    • 2007 May 20, Mark Svenvold, “The Zero-Energy Solution”, New York Times:
      There was nothing odd, or futuristic, or exotically “eco” about the house — no solar panels to be seen, no giant arrays of thermopane windows passively drinking up light and heat; yet here, I’d been told, in the Sourland Mountains in New Jersey, an hour from Manhattan, was a house that had the potential — not long from now, not 20 years from now, but maybe within 5 to 10 years — to help turn millions of American homes into fully self-sustaining power plants, each one capable of producing hydrogen to fuel cars as well.
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  65. unbreachable
    • 2007 May 20, Arthur Lubow, “The Road to Curitiba”, New York Times:
      So he contrived an unbreachable defense.
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  66. unbundling
    • 2007 May 20, Dalton Conley, “Spread the Wealth of Spousal Rights”, New York Times:
      But rather than argue about whether gay or lesbian couples should be allowed to tie the knot, or be granted any marital rights at all, perhaps it is time to do an end run around the culture wars by unbundling the marriage contract into its constituent parts.
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  67. unscrutinized
  68. untouchably
  69. wheatboard
    • 2007 May 20, Amanda Hesser, “Flour Power”, New York Times:
      The wall behind the cubbies is made of wheatboard, an environmentally friendly equivalent of plywood containing processed wheat.
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  70. woolsheds
    • 2007 May 20, Jim Lewis, “The Native Builder”, New York Times:
      The Marie Short House evokes the woolsheds of New South Wales.
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  71. yuks

Sequestered[edit]

  1. macrominiatures
    • 2007 May 20, William Grimes, “Catching Up on a Little Light Reading”, New York Times:
      In descending order, collectors categorize such books as macrominiatures (three to four inches in height), miniatures (one to three inches), microminiatures (one quarter-inch to one inch) and the greatest of the least, the ultramicrominiatures (less than one-quarter inch).
      add
  2. thoroughily
    • 2007 May 20, Mary Jo Murphy, “My Dear Fellow Species”, New York Times:
      If I could be convinced thoroughily that life & mind was in an unknown way a function of other imponderable forces, I shd. be convinced.
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  3. ultramicrominiatures
    • 2007 May 20, William Grimes, “Catching Up on a Little Light Reading”, New York Times:
      In descending order, collectors categorize such books as macrominiatures (three to four inches in height), miniatures (one to three inches), microminiatures (one quarter-inch to one inch) and the greatest of the least, the ultramicrominiatures (less than one-quarter inch).
      add