User:Visviva/NYT 20070529

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This is a list of lowercase non-hyphenated single words found in the 2007-05-29 issue of the New York Times which did not have English entries in the English Wiktionary when this list was created (2009-02-04).

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81184 tokens ‧ 60686 valid lowercase tokens ‧ 8531 types ‧ 47 (~ 0.551%) words before cleaning ‧ 

2007-05-29[edit]

  1. acanthamoeba
    • 2007 May 29, Julie Creswell, “Recall Slows Company’s Plan to Grow in Eye Care”, New York Times:
      Officials from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention provided the company late last week with data from interviews with 46 individuals who had developed acanthamoeba keratitis, an eye infection caused by a parasite that is difficult to detect and treat, since January of 2005, in which 21 of the patients claimed they had used the Complete Moisture Plus products.
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  2. ammunitions
  3. amphinome
  4. antiamnesty
    • 2007 May 29, “Make a Bad Bill Better”, New York Times:
      The antiamnesty fringe will be pleased with itself, but it won’t be an America the rest of us will want to brag about.
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  5. antinarcotics
    • 2007 May 29, “Getting to a Colombia Trade Deal”, New York Times:
      Money for this equipment should be added to next year’s appropriation for Plan Colombia, the antinarcotics partnership which also provides funds for social and economic development.
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  6. ballclub
  7. caffeic
    • 2007 May 29, C. Claiborne Ray, “A Bitter Cup”, New York Times:
      Some of the possible chemical culprits include quinic, chlorogenic, caffeic, citric, malic, lactic, pyruvic and acetic acids; 5-hydroxymethylfurfural; methyl furan; furfuryl mercaptan; trigonelline; pyrazine; thiazole; quinoline; phenylpyridine; and caffeine itself.
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  8. cardioverter
    • 2007 May 29, Barnaby J. Feder, “An Implant for the Heart Gets a Jolt From Above”, New York Times:
      But it has been so hard to predict which patients with weakened hearts need the devices, known as implantable cardioverter defibrillators , or I.C.D.’s, that most patients who receive them end up never needing the lifesaving shock.
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  9. chlorogenic
    • 2007 May 29, C. Claiborne Ray, “A Bitter Cup”, New York Times:
      Studies reported by the institute suggest that perceived bitterness can be reduced by using hard or soft water, as opposed to distilled water; brewing at high temperatures, perhaps because more aromatic chemicals are released, canceling out the bitter ones; and using varieties other than robusta coffee, which has more caffeine and chlorogenic acid.
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  10. coachee
  11. cocoonlike
    • 2007 May 29, Christine Hauser, “For the Tiniest Babies, the Closest Thing to a Cocoon”, New York Times:
      In premature births, however, the second-best place is one where the infant develops in a cocoonlike environment that mimics as many of the womb’s qualities as possible, with uninterrupted sleep, indirect light, skin-to-skin contact and the assuring sound of parents’ voices.
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  12. cyberassaults
  13. dabbawalla
    • 2007 May 29, Saritha Rai, “In India, Grandma Cooks, They Deliver”, New York Times:
      “There is a service called FedEx that is similar to ours — but they don’t deliver lunch,” said one dabbawalla, Dhondu Kondaji Chowdhury.
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  14. dabbawallas
    • 2007 May 29, Saritha Rai, “In India, Grandma Cooks, They Deliver”, New York Times:
      Business has increased for dabbawallas in Mumbai despite the onslaught of office cafeterias, multinational food chains and restaurants.
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  15. floodwalls
    • 2007 May 29, John Schwartz, “Can Science Outwit Storms Like Katrina?”, New York Times:
      The New Orleans levees and floodwalls were built to withstand a hypothetical storm called the standard project hurricane, a model developed with the Weather Bureau beginning in 1959 and based largely on data drawn from previous storms.
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  16. frontality
    • 2007 May 29, Michael Kimmelman, “Revisiting Rouault’s Stained-Glass World”, New York Times:
      The technique was partly a response to Cubism — a strategy for looking abstract, fracturing space and fudging three dimensions, which he never mastered — at the same time that it stressed frontality, gesture and light.
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  17. glissandos
  18. hellos
    • 2007 May 29, Steve Friess, “Oh, Gosh. First, I’d Like to Thank All the Actual People.”, New York Times:
      LAS VEGAS, May 28 — Johnny Depp and Tina Turner meandered slowly through the crowded casino, their progress hindered not by screaming fans or paparazzi but by a pair of Marilyn Monroes up ahead offering each other flamboyant hellos.
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  19. impastoed
    • 2007 May 29, Michael Kimmelman, “Revisiting Rouault’s Stained-Glass World”, New York Times:
      There are a few felicitous watercolors — of a Japanese warrior, others of dancers and landscapes — and several static heads, heavily impastoed, centered and silent like Byzantine icons.
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  20. isolette *
    • 2007 May 29, Christine Hauser, “For the Tiniest Babies, the Closest Thing to a Cocoon”, New York Times:
      In the six months that Mrs. Johnson sat by Ellie’s isolette, she began to understand firsthand the jarring discrepancy between the aquatic nest that her daughter had left too early and the new environment into which she had been thrust and was now expected to grow.
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  21. isolettes
  22. janjaweed
    • 2007 May 29, Sheryl Gay Stolberg, “Bush to Tighten Fiscal Penalties Against Sudan”, New York Times:
      The decision makes good on a threat the president made nearly six weeks ago. Mr. Bush warned then that the United States would act if Sudan’s president, Omar Hassan al-Bashir, did not permit a full deployment of United Nations peacekeeping forces, allow aid to reach the Darfur region and end his support for the janjaweed, the militias that have been systematically killing civilians there.
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  23. neuroplasticity
    • 2007 May 29, Abigail Zuger, M.D., “The Brain: Malleable, Capable, Vulnerable”, New York Times:
      He is one of the first patients to enroll in a rehabilitation clinic guided by principles of neuroplasticity: his good arm and hand are immobilized, and he is set cleaning tables.
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  24. nonpolluted
  25. nonwinning
    • 2007 May 29, The Associated Press, “Sports Briefing”, New York Times:
      Andretti, 45, has led more laps (426) at Indy than any other nonwinning driver.
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  26. overcleaned
    • 2007 May 29, Holland Cotter, “James Beck, 77, Art Scholar and Critic of Conservation, Is Dead”, New York Times:
      He argued that the Michelangelo frescos were being drastically overcleaned — a process that not only erased some of the subtle volumetric painting, he contended, but also exposed the entire surface to modern pollution.
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  27. phenylpyridine
    • 2007 May 29, C. Claiborne Ray, “A Bitter Cup”, New York Times:
      Some of the possible chemical culprits include quinic, chlorogenic, caffeic, citric, malic, lactic, pyruvic and acetic acids; 5-hydroxymethylfurfural; methyl furan; furfuryl mercaptan; trigonelline; pyrazine; thiazole; quinoline; phenylpyridine; and caffeine itself.
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  28. postmarketing
    • 2007 May 29, Denise Grady, “Effective, Yes, but Is It Safe? A Drug’s Risks”, New York Times:
      For years, researchers and government officials have been saying that the solution lies at least in part in continuing to study drugs after they are marketed — a process called postmarketing surveillance, or Phase 4 studies.
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  29. primidone
    • 2007 May 29, Jane E. Brody, “Finding Some Calm After Living With ‘the Shakes’”, New York Times:
      They include beta blockers like propranolol, marketed as Inderal, used mainly to control high blood pressure ; primidone, found in Mysoline; and topiramate, or Topamax, used mainly to treat epilepsy .
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  30. restrictionist
    • 2007 May 29, “Make a Bad Bill Better”, New York Times:
      Their emotions still seem vastly overmatched by the ferocity of the opposition from the restrictionist right, with talk radio lighting up over “amnesty,” callers spitting out the words with all the hate they can pour into it.
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  31. scootering
  32. soundman
    • 2007 May 29, Kathryn Shattuck, “What’s on Tonight”, New York Times:
      Her colleagues Paul Douglas, a cameraman, and James Brolan, a soundman, as well as Capt.
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  33. telepresence
    • 2007 May 29, Paul Burnham Finney, “Telepresence TV”, New York Times:
      But telepresence technology comes at a high price: up to $300,000 to $400,000 a studio.
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  34. tipoff
  35. tollhouse
    • 2007 May 29, Andy Newman, “Beneath the Speeding Cyclone, a Look Back in Time”, New York Times:
      It once hung outside the first structure erected by Europeans on Coney Island — a tollhouse, fittingly enough, through which carriages passed in 1824 on their way to the island’s unspoiled beaches.
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  36. trigonelline
    • 2007 May 29, C. Claiborne Ray, “A Bitter Cup”, New York Times:
      Some of the possible chemical culprits include quinic, chlorogenic, caffeic, citric, malic, lactic, pyruvic and acetic acids; 5-hydroxymethylfurfural; methyl furan; furfuryl mercaptan; trigonelline; pyrazine; thiazole; quinoline; phenylpyridine; and caffeine itself.
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  37. uninterest
  38. unscratchable
  39. walla
    • 2007 May 29, Saritha Rai, “In India, Grandma Cooks, They Deliver”, New York Times:
      The word comes from tiffin dabba, a colonial reference to a box containing a light meal, and walla, the man who carries.
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  40. wallas
    • 2007 May 29, Saritha Rai, “In India, Grandma Cooks, They Deliver”, New York Times:
      A network of wallas picks up the boxes from customers’ homes or from people who cook lunches to order, then delivers the meals to a local railway station.
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Sequestered[edit]

  1. shhhhhhh