User:Visviva/NYT 20070603

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to: navigation, search
← Previous (2007-06-02) Words harvested from the New York Times, 2007-06-03
  • List status: open
→ Next (2007-06-04)

This is a list of lowercase non-hyphenated single words found in the 2007-06-03 issue of the New York Times which did not have English entries in the English Wiktionary when this list was created (2009-02-04).

[ see all NYT pages ] - [ see all tracking lists ]

202096 tokens ‧ 150603 valid lowercase tokens ‧ 14843 types ‧ 129 (~ 0.869%) words before cleaning ‧ 

2007-06-03[edit]

  1. aestheticizing
    • 2007 June 3, Danielle Chapman, “Howl”, New York Times:
      But with its breathless aestheticizing of dog life, its melodrama and its rehashing of old material, “Dog Years” often comes dangerously close to parodying Doty’s best work.
      add
  2. articulacy
    • 2007 June 3, Sarah Churchwell, “Breakdown”, New York Times:
      And this is a pity because Kavenna writes with elegance and flair, endowing Rosa with a graceful articulacy.
      add
  3. bamboozler
  4. basepaths
  5. baserunning
    • 2007 June 3, The Associated Press, “Two Cubs Make Their Peace as Manager Fights a Battle”, New York Times:
      PIRATES 3, DODGERS 1 Ian Snell (5-4) shook off a run of subpar starts to limit Los Angeles to one run over eight innings and host Pittsburgh overcame more baserunning blunders.
      add
  6. bicoastal
  7. boundariless
    • 2007 June 3, Walter Kirn, “In the Wee Small Hours”, New York Times:
      “After Dark,” Murakami’s latest novel, is a streamlined, hushed ensemble piece built on the notion that very late at night, after the lamps of logic have been snuffed and rationality has shut its eyes, life on earth becomes boundariless and blurred.
      add
  8. brickyard
    • 2007 June 3, Somini Sengupta, “In a New India, an Old Industry Buoys Peasants”, New York Times:
      Since Vanita was a child, the family has roamed the country in search of work — in construction and road-building, and finally, here to this brickyard.
      add
  9. brickyards
    • 2007 June 3, Somini Sengupta, “In a New India, an Old Industry Buoys Peasants”, New York Times:
      The lure of steady work is drawing more and more migrants like the Khabhus, who come to brickyards like this one around the country because they can no longer sustain themselves by farming.
      add
  10. bronzy
    • 2007 June 3, Liesl Schillinger, “In Pursuit of Beauty”, New York Times:
      For porcelain-skinned redheads she recommends “soft peaches, coppers, bronzy tones.”
      add
  11. camos
    • 2007 June 3, Field Maloney, “Demolition Man”, New York Times:
      Rant’s girlfriend, Echo Lawrence, describes her first Party Crash, pursuing a mock deer hunter in camos, with a Styrofoam buck on top of his sedan.
      add
  12. chawanmushi
    • 2007 June 3, Amanda Hesser, “1989: Spinach Roman Style”, New York Times:
      The nori, shallot and garlic mixture reminded him of a nori purée they had been making at the restaurant for spooning on top of chawanmushi, a delicate egg-and-dashi custard.
      add
  13. chenna
    • 2007 June 3, Amanda Hesser, “Cooking”, New York Times:
      (His fortune cookies are made with a chocolate batter; chenna, an Indian cheese, is enhanced with sake, cherries, balsamic vinegar and orange-blossom water.)
      add
  14. clanless
    • 2007 June 3, John Green, “Children’s Books”, New York Times:
      It tells the story of Melinda Sordino, a clanless outcast who barely endures her freshman year at a suburban high school, and it features one of the best young narrative voices this side of Holden Caulfield.
      add
  15. cologned
    • 2007 June 3, Allen Salkin, “Lower East Side Is Under a Groove”, New York Times:
      As some of the early bohemian hangouts are being overwhelmed by a decidedly high-heeled and cologned crowd, and others give way to hotels and luxury rentals like the Ludlow, a 23-story brick-and-glass giant that looms over Katz’s Delicatessen, Mr. Misrahi finds himself vilified by some longtime Lower East Side watchers (even though the Ludlow, the most visible symbol of gentrification, is one of the few projects he had nothing to do with).
      add
  16. commodified
    • 2007 June 3, Robert Simonson, “Techno-Touches”, New York Times:
      But Mr. Tresnjak fully integrated them into his vision of a modern-day Venice as chilly, sleek and calculating as any Wall Street house: a world where all exchanges — monetary, marital, fraternal, emotional — are coolly commodified, and where any weakness is quickly exploited and the raid then rationalized as “just business.”
      add
  17. composter
    • 2007 June 3, “Letters”, New York Times:
      Well, I have it in my will that my cremains will become part of the compost heap in the backyard of my son, who is a serious composter and gardener.
      add
  18. countywide
    • 2007 June 3, Ralph Blumenthal, “For Dallas, New Prosecutor Means an End to the Old Ways”, New York Times:
      In addition to the upset by Mr. Watkins, a 6-foot-5 defense lawyer who had never prosecuted a case, Democrats won every contested countywide race, and all 42 judgeships at stake.
      add
  19. crabcakes
    • 2007 June 3, “Menus and Summer Music”, New York Times:
      The menu includes New Zealand venison sausage with red cabbage and apple-cherry chutney; New Zealand style crabcakes with lemon and citrus tartar sauce; lamb or fisherman’s pot pie; and grilled items like lamb chops, salmon or chicken.
      add
  20. deadliner
  21. divil
    • 2007 June 3, Jon Glaser, “A Fully Grown Adult Baby”, New York Times:
      Jist havin’ a divil of a time tryin’ to figgerout these lay-buls.”
      add
  22. dopily
    • 2007 June 3, Holly Morris, “Water World”, New York Times:
      Euphorically succumbing to nitrogen narcosis, I was drawn to the sharks, dopily fixated on the commingling of species, wondering why we couldn’t all just get along, until my dive master dragged me to safety.
      add
  23. engrained
  24. exonerations
    • 2007 June 3, Ralph Blumenthal, “For Dallas, New Prosecutor Means an End to the Old Ways”, New York Times:
      Now, many more DNA exonerations could be in store under a review of more than 400 other cases ordered by Mr. Watkins, 39, who made history last November by eking out a second-try victory in a Democratic landslide to become Texas’s first black district attorney.
      add
  25. farness
    • 2007 June 3, Heather Rogers, “Current Thinking”, New York Times:
      The system would allow the prospective homeowner to be, according to The New York Times, “utterly and for all time independent of the nearness or farness of the big electric companies.”
      add
  26. fermentable
    • 2007 June 3, Jason Pontin, “First, Cure Malaria. Next, Global Warming.”, New York Times:
      So far, most biofuel ventures have tried to create better ethanol fuels by converting different kinds of “biomass” — everything from corn to sugar cane to switchgrass and jatropha trees — to fermentable sugars.
      add
  27. festoonery
    • 2007 June 3, ZoË Wolff, “North American Songbird”, New York Times:
      Earlier that day, seeking festoonery, she tore the trim from a dress.
      add
  28. flagstick
    • 2007 June 3, Charles Mcgrath, “Just Like Us — Only Better”, New York Times:
      The sensible thing, the smart thing, was for him to hit a wedge back onto the fairway and then nail his third shot close enough to the flagstick for a one-putt par or, worst case, a two-putt bogey and a playoff.
      add
  29. geekdom
  30. gingered
    • 2007 June 3, Amanda Hesser, “Cooking”, New York Times:
      (There’s nothing like a state dinner to get my mouth watering — gingered pheasant consommé!)
      add
  31. glamorizer
    • 2007 June 3, Terrence Rafferty, “A Jazzman So Cool You Want Him Frozen at His Peak”, New York Times:
      Maybe you had to have grown up in that nervous decade, as Mr. Weber did, to find Mr. Baker’s ostentatious laid-backness subversive, to imbue it with so much bad-boy allure. Mr. Weber, who is also a fashion photographer, is a glamorizer both by trade and by nature, and when something imprints itself as strongly on his fantasy life as the image of the young Chet Baker clearly did, he holds onto it tightly — cherishes it, embellishes it, uses it to transport himself back to his own hard-dreaming youth.
      add
  32. gobsmacking
    • 2007 June 3, Candice Millard, “Pirates of the Caribbean”, New York Times:
      The Americas were, as Talty puts it, “a place of gobsmacking riches,” and England wanted a larger share.
      add
  33. groundout
    • 2007 June 3, The Associated Press, “Struggling White Sox Promise Bullpen Changes Are Coming”, New York Times:
      ATHLETICS 1, TWINS 0 Joe Blanton pitched a career-best three-hitter, Shannon Stewart broke a scoreless tie with a double play groundout in the sixth, and host Oakland snapped Minnesota’s season-best five-game winning streak.
      add
  34. handblown
    • 2007 June 3, David Colman, “When in the Netherlands...”, New York Times:
      But of all the extravagances that reflected the country’s new wealth and glory, Mr. Giunta became most fixated on the bouquets’ vases: typically baroque handblown Venetian goblets of sap-green glass.
      add
  35. heliboarding
  36. hipification
    • 2007 June 3, Allen Salkin, “Lower East Side Is Under a Groove”, New York Times:
      He is, in large part, responsible for the hipification (some may say the crassification) of the neighborhood, a district east of SoHo and south of the East Village.
      add
  37. identitarians
    • 2007 June 3, Ginia Bellafante, “A Dialogue Between Plays and the World”, New York Times:
      In the play Mr. Wilson regressively casts his lot with the identitarians of that period, who saw assimilation as the great potential undoing of black culture.
      add
  38. impersonality
    • 2007 June 3, Will Blythe, “Innocents Lost”, New York Times:
      There’s an impersonality to Englander’s voice that reads as an act of homage to the Jewish past.
      add
  39. inlanders
    • 2007 June 3, Mireya Navarro, “Surf’s Up, but the Water Is Brown”, New York Times:
      Among the fearless: inlanders escaping the suffocating heat; tourists who don’t know any better; and die-hard surfers who try to protect themselves by taking vitamins, by making sure their hepatitis and tetanus vaccinations are up to date, and by rinsing body cavities with hydrogen peroxide.
      add
  40. integrationist
  41. jivest
  42. judgeships
    • 2007 June 3, Ralph Blumenthal, “For Dallas, New Prosecutor Means an End to the Old Ways”, New York Times:
      In addition to the upset by Mr. Watkins, a 6-foot-5 defense lawyer who had never prosecuted a case, Democrats won every contested countywide race, and all 42 judgeships at stake.
      add
  43. kewpie
    • 2007 June 3, John Hodgman, “Comics”, New York Times:
      Deitch’s stories get progressively grander and weirder, flying forward in time to Ledicker’s widow’s roadside museum of the odd, and back again to his father’s adventures with a group of tiny mystics who are as obsessed with old silent films as Deitch is, and then up to the stars, where the whole drama is observed by aliens the size of kewpie dolls.
      add
  44. klutzier
    • 2007 June 3, Robert Christgau, “Combat Rocker”, New York Times:
      I’ve paged through music biographies far klutzier than Salewicz’s and gratefully come away with what I needed.
      add
  45. kulfi
    • 2007 June 3, Amanda Hesser, “Cooking”, New York Times:
      That recipe and those for other Spice Market desserts, like Ovaltine and milk chocolate kulfi, and jasmine rice pudding, are also included here.
      add
  46. landmarked
    • 2007 June 3, Jake Mooney, “Before the Cobblestones Vanish, a Push to Preserve”, New York Times:
      “Dumbo west of Jay was successfully developed and invested in without being landmarked, while still preserving the overall historic nature,” said Peter Forman, who is a co-owner of two buildings on Jay Street that would probably be in the proposed district.
      add
  47. litigatory
    • 2007 June 3, Kevin Baker, “Modernist Times”, New York Times:
      Glazer echoes the lament of his friend and collaborator, Daniel Patrick Moynihan , for the Westway project, supposedly a victim of New York’s “regulatory and litigatory maze.”
      add
  48. matcha
    • 2007 June 3, Amanda Hesser, “Cooking”, New York Times:
      But although he introduces ingredients like red sala syrup, matcha (green tea powder), Horlicks (powdered malted barley) and mukwa (candied fennel seeds) as if they should be new friends in your life, he doesn’t force them on you.
      add
  49. minicamp
    • 2007 June 3, The Associated Press, “Packers Rookie Carries Playbook to Photo Shoot”, New York Times:
      But when the N.F.L. told the Packers rookie running back Brandon Jackson that he was essentially being forced to accept an invitation to a photo shoot in Los Angeles instead of attending the Packers’ minicamp two weeks ago, Jackson went kicking and screaming.
      add
  50. minitour
  51. mukwa
    • 2007 June 3, Amanda Hesser, “Cooking”, New York Times:
      But although he introduces ingredients like red sala syrup, matcha (green tea powder), Horlicks (powdered malted barley) and mukwa (candied fennel seeds) as if they should be new friends in your life, he doesn’t force them on you.
      add
  52. multicar
  53. multilocked
    • 2007 June 3, Ian Fisher, “Fingers That Keep the Most Treasured Violins Fit”, New York Times:
      Every morning, Mr. Mosconi, the city’s official musical conservationist, stands before pristine, multilocked glass cases and faces three violins by the Amatis (one of the first makers of the modern violin, from the mid-16th century), two by the Guarneris and four instruments — three violins and a cello — by Stradivari. Mr. Mosconi has no favorite: The very question is a mild affront.
      add
  54. mumming
    • 2007 June 3, Barbara Ehrenreich, “Dance, Dance, Revolution”, New York Times:
      Facing what he saw as an epidemic of melancholy, or what we would now call depression, the 17th-century English writer Robert Burton placed much of the blame on the Calvinist hostility to “dancing, singing, masking, mumming and stage plays.”
      add
  55. muscadelle
    • 2007 June 3, Howard G. Goldberg, “A French White Under the Radar”, New York Times:
      Lamothe’s bone-dry version, blended from sauvignon blanc, sémillon and muscadelle grapes, pretty much typifies the genre at its best.
      add
  56. nonentrepreneurial
  57. nonjournalistic
  58. nonpayers
    • 2007 June 3, Teri Karush Rogers, “When It’s Time to Pay the Piper”, New York Times:
      “If the board wants to voluntarily allow nonpayers to slide, they can do so,” said Aaron Shmulewitz, a real estate lawyer at Belkin Burden Wenig & Goldman, a Manhattan firm that represents more than 250 co-op and condo boards in New York City .
      add
  59. nonsolicited
  60. nosybodies
    • 2007 June 3, Tina Kelley, “Company for an Only Child, and for Parents, Peace of Mind”, New York Times:
      Which leaves one as a pretty lonely number for some here at Fuddruckers, who complain that they face ever more pressure — from relatives, nosybodies, and their own children — to produce siblings.
      add
  61. outfinesse
  62. outhandle
  63. outpointed
    • 2007 June 3, The Associated Press, “Ibragimov Easily Takes W.B.O. Title From Briggs”, New York Times:
      Shannon Briggs ’s hold on his World Boxing Organization heavyweight title slipped away Saturday night at the quick hands of Sultan Ibragimov, who easily outpointed him over 12 rounds.
      add
  64. overcaffeinated
    • 2007 June 3, Audrey Davidow, “So, Sweetie, I Quit to Bake Cupcakes”, New York Times:
      Blame it on a culture where the BlackBerry-obsessed run around like overcaffeinated track stars, but there is a tremendous craving for comfort, particularly in fast-paced cities like Los Angeles, said Grant McCracken, the author of the book “Culture and Consumption II: Markets, Meaning and Brand Management.”
      add
  65. overdriven
    • 2007 June 3, Ben Ratliff, “The Heroic, the Hermetic and the Honky-Tonk”, New York Times:
      On “Régléman”(Mi5), his first album, Mr. Josué engages in what he calls “electro-vodou,” which means juxtaposing voodoo-ritual chants with synthesizer tones, overdriven thumb-piano riffs, Afro-funk guitar rhythm, echoey textures.
      add
  66. overresearched
    • 2007 June 3, Robert Christgau, “Combat Rocker”, New York Times:
      Writing music bios is hard — even generous advances have a way of disappearing before the job is done right, with overresearched childhoods and rushed endgames common, especially if the writer has no academic salary to fall back on.
      add
  67. partitas
  68. pictureless
    • 2007 June 3, Steven Heller, “Visuals”, New York Times:
      The first pictureless postcard was produced in Austria in 1869, and by the end of the century picture cards had been introduced, setting off a rash of collecting.
      add
  69. pitbull *
  70. planelike
    • 2007 June 3, Sarah Towers, “Shattered”, New York Times:
      (The cover of “Underworld,” to name one uncanny example, had a planelike bird flying toward the twin towers.)
      add
  71. poundcake
    • 2007 June 3, Amanda Hesser, “Cooking”, New York Times:
      Most recipes can be shopped for at a typical grocery store — a condensed-milk poundcake, for instance.
      add
  72. preadults
    • 2007 June 3, Field Maloney, “Demolition Man”, New York Times:
      This point of view — which Palahniuk has a knack for expressing in bumper-stickerlike rallying cries — is catnip to preadults (these days, just about everyone under 45), which helps explain why his books are best sellers.
      add
  73. prestart
  74. primitivism
    • 2007 June 3, Kaiama L. Glover, “Postmodern Homegirl”, New York Times:
      Adorned with only a few beads and feathers placed around her hips and ankles, dancing suggestively on and around the large, black, equally underdressed Joe Alex, she gave the audience, hopped up on Picasso’s primitivism and its attendant “escapist colonialist and modernist fantasies,” something that appeared to have emerged straight from the deepest African jungle.
      add
  75. psilocin
    • 2007 June 3, Dick Teresi, “Do You Believe in Magic?”, New York Times:
      The psilocybes, containing psilocybin and psilocin, are the friendlier magic mushrooms.
      add
  76. psilocybe
    • 2007 June 3, Dick Teresi, “Do You Believe in Magic?”, New York Times:
      Another psilocybe, cubensis, is less potent than the Liberty Cap, but easier to grow and more popular.
      add
  77. psilocybes
    • 2007 June 3, Dick Teresi, “Do You Believe in Magic?”, New York Times:
      The psilocybes, containing psilocybin and psilocin, are the friendlier magic mushrooms.
      add
  78. pummelings
    • 2007 June 3, Walter Kirn, “Boys Gone Mild”, New York Times:
      I’m as romantic as any middle-aged man about the formative pummelings of my playground days.
      add
  79. racialized
    • 2007 June 3, Kaiama L. Glover, “Postmodern Homegirl”, New York Times:
      Balancing the playful native girl and the Parisian sophisticate was crucial to the “image invention and racialized gender transcoding” that kept Baker in the spotlight.
      add
  80. reconviction
    • 2007 June 3, Ralph Blumenthal, “For Dallas, New Prosecutor Means an End to the Old Ways”, New York Times:
      Only Illinois and New York, besides Texas, have had more convictions overturned by genetic testing than Dallas County, a fact attributable in part to evidence retained to assure reconviction in the event of a successful appeal.
      add
  81. regressively
    • 2007 June 3, Ginia Bellafante, “A Dialogue Between Plays and the World”, New York Times:
      In the play Mr. Wilson regressively casts his lot with the identitarians of that period, who saw assimilation as the great potential undoing of black culture.
      add
  82. rehydrations
    • 2007 June 3, Ben Ratliff, “The Heroic, the Hermetic and the Honky-Tonk”, New York Times:
      Among the recent rehydrations of aging and wizened honky-tonk singers, “Wagonmaster” (Anti- ) is one of the best. Mr. Wagoner’s voice was never that lithe to begin with, so it sounds natural at 79, and his centered charisma remains intact.
      add
  83. sabayon *
    • 2007 June 3, Amanda Hesser, “Cooking”, New York Times:
      An orange-blossom-water sabayon is thickened in the microwave (and I will never again make finicky sabayon any other way).
      add
  84. sahel
  85. sala *
    • 2007 June 3, Amanda Hesser, “Cooking”, New York Times:
      But although he introduces ingredients like red sala syrup, matcha (green tea powder), Horlicks (powdered malted barley) and mukwa (candied fennel seeds) as if they should be new friends in your life, he doesn’t force them on you.
      add
  86. semifictional
    • 2007 June 3, Natasha Wimmer, “Parallel Paths”, New York Times:
      Cercas could say the same for his own career as a Spanish novelist — until that book, a stealthily brilliant semifictional account of the Spanish Civil War, became an unexpected best seller in Spain and abroad.
      add
  87. sharpish
  88. shmattes
    • 2007 June 3, Allen Salkin, “Lower East Side Is Under a Groove”, New York Times:
      That four-part history of one address — from shmattes to hipsters to bulldozers to tourists — is a summary of much of the recent evolution of the Lower East Side.
      add
  89. siblinged
    • 2007 June 3, Tina Kelley, “Company for an Only Child, and for Parents, Peace of Mind”, New York Times:
      Only children also have a slight advantage in terms of vocabulary and math readiness over their siblinged counterparts, though “by the time they’re 25 or so, it’s pretty much dissipated,” according to Toni L. Falbo, a psychology professor at the University of Texas at Austin who has studied only children for decades.
      add
  90. siblingless
    • 2007 June 3, Tina Kelley, “Company for an Only Child, and for Parents, Peace of Mind”, New York Times:
      A magazine called Only Child, which features articles on caring for aging parents solo along with profiles of famous siblingless people like Robin Williams and Rudolph W. Giuliani , has had a spurt in circulation this year.
      add
  91. slingbacks
    • 2007 June 3, Liza Weisstuch, “Boho in Boston”, New York Times:
      Baby-doll dresses, anything lace-trimmed, slingbacks for women.
      add
  92. spectatorship
    • 2007 June 3, Liz Brown, “Funny as All Get-Out”, New York Times:
      For “Bullethead,” as Frank Sinatra called this bald, yapping comic, spectatorship is the sport.
      add
  93. sriracha
  94. stepmotherhood
    • 2007 June 3, Anne Mendelson, “Ladies Who Read”, New York Times:
      Lissy, who never makes it through any of the assigned books, nonetheless wrestles with Angela’s claims about art as life lesson and ends up with a stronger lease on marriage and stepmotherhood as well as miraculous recompense for a never-healed childhood loss.
      add
  95. stultifyingly
    • 2007 June 3, Alix Browne, “The Strong, Not So Silent Type”, New York Times:
      Augustyniak and Amzalag met in the late ’80s, when they were both students at L’École Nationale Supérieure des Arts Décoratifs in Paris, a place they describe as having a stultifyingly classical approach to the practice of art but a surprisingly progressive one when it came to theory.
      add
  96. subcastes
    • 2007 June 3, Amelia Gentleman, “Indian Shepherds Stoop to Conquer Caste System”, New York Times:
      India has more than 6,000 castes and subcastes, 3,743 of which are designated “backward” on the grounds of social and educational deprivation.
      add
  97. subjectivities
    • 2007 June 3, Jonathan Lethem, “Edward’s End”, New York Times:
      That horror is located in the distance between two selves, two subjectivities: humans who will themselves to be “as one,” and fail miserably.
      add
  98. symbolist
    • 2007 June 3, Danielle Chapman, “Howl”, New York Times:
      Being given a tomato-juice bath after being sprayed by a skunk, “Arden is positively symphonic with scent, like that fantasy creation of the decadent symbolist des Esseintes, in Huysman’s 19th-century novel, the perfume organ.”
      add
  99. tankmen
  100. tentlike
    • 2007 June 3, Nicolai Ouroussoff, “The Best Buildings You’ll Ever Hear”, New York Times:
      Draped over this interior, the strange yellow, tentlike skin was a joyfully democratic expression of the hall’s public character and a landmark of communal solace in a divided city.
      add
  101. unblown
    • 2007 June 3, Dick Teresi, “Do You Believe in Magic?”, New York Times:
      Fortunately, for this, his first book, Letcher’s mind has remained unblown.
      add
  102. underbody
    • 2007 June 3, Joseph Siano, “533,000 Miles and It Runs Like a Top”, New York Times:
      Vladimir Samarin, a mechanic in Toronto who has a car-care Web site at samarins.com , suggested that drivers living where the humidity was high or the winters were harsh get underbody rustproofing when they buy a new car.
      add
  103. undercovers
    • 2007 June 3, Emily Brady, “A Corner Once Sunny, Made Dreary by Drugs”, New York Times:
      He added, “We have even invited the police to put undercovers in the store; we offered to put them behind the counter.”
      add
  104. unfractured
    • 2007 June 3, Walter Kirn, “Boys Gone Mild”, New York Times:
      I would rather that his head remain unfractured, even if that means his psyche remains unchallenged.
      add
  105. uninvolving
    • 2007 June 3, Charles Isherwood, “Imported Doesn’t Always Mean Important”, New York Times:
      As a director Mr. Hare must take his share of the responsibility for the theatrical nonevent that was “The Year of Magical Thinking,” the uninvolving stage adaptation of Joan Didion ’s memoir.
      add
  106. unprescribed
    • 2007 June 3, Walter Kirn, “Boys Gone Mild”, New York Times:
      The essence of what we called play, as I recall, was not danger but the fact that it came unprescribed.
      add
  107. vanitas
    • 2007 June 3, David Colman, “When in the Netherlands...”, New York Times:
      Their fragility nicely illustrates another Dutch painting tradition: the vanitas, a lovely still life to which the painter added a skull as a reminder that, well, you can’t take it with you.
      add
  108. vanning
    • 2007 June 3, Robert Christgau, “Combat Rocker”, New York Times:
      There was also a superb album’s worth of singles and, oh yes, the best-selling “Combat Rock” (1982), which made the Clash almost as rich as they were famous — not to mention their intense live show, with Strummer’s possessed theatrics the focus whether they were vanning through England or headlining Japan.
      add
  109. vessell
    • 2007 June 3, Candice Millard, “Pirates of the Caribbean”, New York Times:
      Its commissions entitled, and encouraged, privateers to “attaque, fight with or surprise any vessell or vessells whatsoever belonging to the King of Spain or any of his subjects.”
      add
  110. vessells
    • 2007 June 3, Candice Millard, “Pirates of the Caribbean”, New York Times:
      Its commissions entitled, and encouraged, privateers to “attaque, fight with or surprise any vessell or vessells whatsoever belonging to the King of Spain or any of his subjects.”
      add
  111. washdays
    • 2007 June 3, Jay Romano, “Making Accidents Less Likely to Happen”, New York Times:
      “If you have rubber water-supply hoses, you should replace them with braided metal hoses sold at home-improvement centers,” Mr. Kraeutler said, adding that owners should also shut off the water between washdays.
      add

Sequestered[edit]

  1. crassification: protologism
    • 2007 June 3, Allen Salkin, “Lower East Side Is Under a Groove”, New York Times:
      He is, in large part, responsible for the hipification (some may say the crassification) of the neighborhood, a district east of SoHo and south of the East Village.
      add
  2. croissanwich: Burger King trademark, doesn't seem very attestable in this spelling
    • 2007 June 3, Amanda Hesser, “Cooking”, New York Times:
      With Web sites like allrecipes.com and epicurious.com serving up a bottomless stockpot of potential dinner menus, and countless blogs detailing the culinary adventures of cooks just like you, it would seem that cookbooks would be destined to join milkmen and the croissanwich in the culinary graveyard.
      add
  3. desnobbed
    • 2007 June 3, Rob Walker, “Vintage Trend”, New York Times:
      Each chain emphasizes a desnobbed lexicon for wine discussion, a heavily edited selection of relatively low-priced bottles and an emphasis on the shop as a location for events and socializing.
      add
  4. mycomania
    • 2007 June 3, Dick Teresi, “Do You Believe in Magic?”, New York Times:
      In “Shroom” he rewrites the history of magic mushrooms, systematically destroying the myths festered by pioneers like McKenna, R. Gordon Wasson, Robert Graves, Aldous Huxley and others, while recognizing their heroic efforts in promoting mycomania.
      add
  5. myconaut
    • 2007 June 3, Dick Teresi, “Do You Believe in Magic?”, New York Times:
      One myconaut reported that the freckles on her arm “got up and danced away.”
      add