User:Visviva/NYT 20070606

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This is a list of lowercase non-hyphenated single words found in the 2007-06-06 issue of the New York Times which did not have English entries in the English Wiktionary when this list was created (2009-02-04).

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94762 tokens ‧ 69373 valid lowercase tokens ‧ 8766 types ‧ 44 (~ 0.502%) words before cleaning ‧ 

2007-06-06[edit]

  1. antituberculosis
    • 2007 June 6, Lawrence K. Altman, “Agency Warns of Surge in Drug-Resistant TB”, New York Times:
      About 420,000, or 5 percent, of the estimated 8.8 million new cases of tuberculosis in the world are now resistant to many standard antituberculosis drugs, Dr. Mario C. Raviglione, who directs the W.H.O.’s tuberculosis department, said in an interview.
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  2. caipirinha *
    • 2007 June 6, “Dining Briefs”, New York Times:
      When somebody asked for a caipirinha last week, the bartender said apologetically that he could make one but that it wouldn’t be authentic because he didn’t have the right kind of sugar.
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  3. chiffonade
  4. crustless
  5. cukes
    • 2007 June 6, Mark Bittman, “In Paris, Bringing Vegetables Out to Play”, New York Times:
      On display are not only deep black radishes, the darkest green savoy cabbage and the to-be-expected but nevertheless mind-boggling cheese assortment, but also plate-size scallops replete with roe, a dozen types of oysters — including the coveted but increasingly rare Belon — crème fraîche, yogurt that looks just as rich as crème fraîche, and the herbs and vegetables Patricia Wells craves: cress (there are two kinds), lemon thyme, spinach, zucchini, fennel, baby cukes, fresh garlic (with stalks), spring onions and more.
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  6. danciness
    • 2007 June 6, Alastair Macaulay, “The Many Lives of a Dancer, Explored Upon the Stage”, New York Times:
      As the two principals — roles that in the 1980s still proved stylistic challenges to such experienced stars as Mr. Lavery and Merrill Ashley — Sara Adams, 17, and Zachary Catazaro Clark, 18, (first cast) and Kristen Segin, 17, and Joshua Thew, 19, (second cast) showed a few rough edges but, more important, real danciness. Ms. Adams showed particular brio in the long, amazingly brisk pas de deux.
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  7. designative
  8. flipness
    • 2007 June 6, Neil Genzlinger, “The Wounded Return Home, and Another Battle Begins”, New York Times:
      No flipness is intended; one man profiled in the program, which chronicles the rehabilitation of several American soldiers severely wounded in Iraq , makes a similar observation himself.
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  9. flyout
    • 2007 June 6, Ben Shpigel, “Glavine Does His Part, but the Mets Don’t Help Him Out”, New York Times:
      Freely admitting he was not playing at full strength, Beltrán went 0 for 5, including a flyout to the left-field fence in the seventh that could have propelled Glavine toward victory.
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  10. frikadell
  11. geekdom
    • 2007 June 6, Eric Asimov, “To the Envelope Pushers, Cheers!”, New York Times:
      Wines like those might be considered “spoofulated,” a geekdom term for engineered wines that, in another vernacular, is a synonym for gag-me-with-a-spoon.
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  12. improvisationally
    • 2007 June 6, Jennifer Dunning, “Vignettes That Wind Lusciously in and Out of the Music”, New York Times:
      The dancers slipped in and out of the music, winding lusciously and for the most part improvisationally through bluesy and comical sounds accented by Mr. Dara’s drawling banter.
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  13. jazziness
    • 2007 June 6, Alastair Macaulay, “The Many Lives of a Dancer, Explored Upon the Stage”, New York Times:
      The centerpiece was Balanchine’s “Four Temperaments,” staged by Suki Schorer in an account that, with its qualities of jazziness and attack, made the masterpiece seem as cutting-edge as it surely was when new in 1946.
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  14. judgeships
  15. keftedes
  16. kofte
  17. kottbuller
  18. lovefest
    • 2007 June 6, Richard Sandomir, “To an Equine Athlete Dying Young”, New York Times:
      They chose a course that extended the lovefest, bonded Barbaro to his fans and cemented his appeal as a documentary subject.
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  19. massaman
    • 2007 June 6, “Dining Briefs”, New York Times:
      That’s how you get avocado in massaman curry and tomato in a green papaya salad, though a friend told me the tomato in the salad was not uncommon in Thailand.
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  20. microgreens
  21. minerality
    • 2007 June 6, Eric Asimov, “To the Envelope Pushers, Cheers!”, New York Times:
      Wine geeks are not a monolithic group, although certain characteristics emerge, like a preference for minerality and acidity in a wine over soft fruitiness, an abhorrence for new oak flavors and a reverence for terroir and traditional methods.
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  22. minimarkets
    • 2007 June 6, Craig S. Smith, “British Grocer Set to Dip Toe in U.S. Market”, New York Times:
      Its direct competition, analysts say, include Trader Joe’s and Famima minimarkets, both also foreign-owned, by Germans and Japanese, respectively.
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  23. mostarda *
  24. nevirapine
    • 2007 June 6, Sharon Lafraniere, “New AIDS Cases in Africa Outpace Treatment Gains”, New York Times:
      Preventing them from infecting their babies is relatively simple: a single antiretroviral pill called nevirapine — or better yet, a combination of drugs — is given at the onset of labor.
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  25. nonchef
    • 2007 June 6, Mark Bittman, “In Paris, Bringing Vegetables Out to Play”, New York Times:
      Perhaps most impressively, she became the American to whom Americans (and often the French as well) turn when they want to know about French food, one of the few nonchef icons in the world of good cooking, and the envy of practically everyone.
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  26. oleocanthal
    • 2007 June 6, Harold Mcgee, “Extra Virgin Anti-Inflammatories”, New York Times:
      He, Dr. Breslin and several collaborators confirmed that the pungent substance in olive oil is a phenolic chemical, which they named oleocanthal.
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  27. overpopularized
  28. panko
    • 2007 June 6, “Dining Briefs”, New York Times:
      Peekytoe crab meat was bound with matzo meal, shrimp chips and panko and coated with a saffron and red bell pepper aioli.
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  29. perfusionists
    • 2007 June 6, Nick Bunkley, “Transplant Team Dies in Jet Crash; Mechanical Problems Suspected”, New York Times:
      The doctors were joined several hours later by two perfusionists, Richard Chenault II and Richard Lapensee, and all four sped to Willow Run Airport, a cargo terminal in Ypsilanti, Mich., about 15 miles east of the hospital.
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  30. picual
    • 2007 June 6, Harold Mcgee, “Extra Virgin Anti-Inflammatories”, New York Times:
      An oil from the Spanish picual variety smelled startlingly of tomato leaf, then green herbs: sage and rosemary and basil and mint and eucalyptus.
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  31. pitmasters
    • 2007 June 6, Florence Fabricant, “Food Calendar”, New York Times:
      More than a dozen pitmasters from New York and around the country will be serving their specialties, and there will also be seminars, cooking demonstrations and merchandise for sale.
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  32. plancha *
    • 2007 June 6, “Dining Briefs”, New York Times:
      “Spiced chicken lollipops” ($16) consisted of skewered wing meat marinated in sumac and wild thyme and then grilled on a plancha with a bracing tamarind glaze.
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  33. predraft
  34. riesling
    • 2007 June 6, Eric Asimov, “To the Envelope Pushers, Cheers!”, New York Times:
      Some are in the business, sommeliers like Paul Grieco of Hearth and Insieme in New York, who worships at the altar of riesling and plies a willing clientele with such oddball grapes as savagnin, rkatsiteli, romorantin and others even harder to pronounce.
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  35. rkatsiteli
    • 2007 June 6, Eric Asimov, “To the Envelope Pushers, Cheers!”, New York Times:
      Some are in the business, sommeliers like Paul Grieco of Hearth and Insieme in New York, who worships at the altar of riesling and plies a willing clientele with such oddball grapes as savagnin, rkatsiteli, romorantin and others even harder to pronounce.
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  36. romorantin
    • 2007 June 6, Eric Asimov, “To the Envelope Pushers, Cheers!”, New York Times:
      Some are in the business, sommeliers like Paul Grieco of Hearth and Insieme in New York, who worships at the altar of riesling and plies a willing clientele with such oddball grapes as savagnin, rkatsiteli, romorantin and others even harder to pronounce.
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  37. savagnin
    • 2007 June 6, Eric Asimov, “To the Envelope Pushers, Cheers!”, New York Times:
      Some are in the business, sommeliers like Paul Grieco of Hearth and Insieme in New York, who worships at the altar of riesling and plies a willing clientele with such oddball grapes as savagnin, rkatsiteli, romorantin and others even harder to pronounce.
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  38. toothachingly
    • 2007 June 6, Melissa Clark, “Sweet and Sour Sit Down to Dessert”, New York Times:
      These two truths coexisted in my mind without overlapping until I bit into a piece of crumb cake so texturally perfect (soft sliver of cake topped by a deep layer of grape-size crumbs), yet so toothachingly sweet that the only antidote was sucking on the lemon in my seltzer.
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  39. tsukune

Sequestered[edit]

  1. domoic
    • 2007 June 6, Regan Morris, “Sea Lions Hit by High Levels of Acid Poison in California”, New York Times:
      Peter Wallerstein of the Whale Rescue Team, a private group authorized by Los Angeles to rescue whales and other marine mammals, said he had found the sea lion on the sand in nearby Manhattan Beach. Mr. Wallerstein said he feared she could have been poisoned by domoic acid, a toxin released by large blooms of algae that causes seizures in sea lions.
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  2. wakka