User:Visviva/NYT 20070612

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This is a list of lowercase non-hyphenated single words found in the 2007-06-12 issue of the New York Times which did not have English entries in the English Wiktionary when this list was created (2009-02-04).

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98167 tokens ‧ 73378 valid lowercase tokens ‧ 9022 types ‧ 39 (~ 0.432%) words before cleaning ‧ 

2007-06-12[edit]

  1. acrosome
    • 2007 June 12, Natalie Angier, “Sleek, Fast and Focused: The Cells That Make Dad Dad”, New York Times:
      At the tip of the sperm head is the acrosome, a specialized sack of enzymes that help the sperm penetrate through what Joseph S. Tash, a male fertility expert at the University of Kansas Medical Center, calls the “forest” of ancillary cells and connective tissue that surrounds the ripe, ready egg.
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  2. boinging
    • 2007 June 12, Neil Genzlinger, “Oh, the Songs Shine Bright in Some Old Kentucky Homes”, New York Times:
      Many, many strings are plucked in “The Rhythm of My Soul: Kentucky Roots Music,” a documentary by Roger Sherman tonight on PBS , but all that boinging never really convinces you that Kentucky has anything more to boast about musically than assorted other states.
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  3. breathlike
  4. cartoonlike
  5. eleutherodactylines
    • 2007 June 12, Henry Fountain, “Warming in the Arctic? Blame the Snow. The Dirty Snow, That Is.”, New York Times:
      Scientists at Penn State have penciled in the branches of the evolutionary tree of a major group of frogs, the eleutherodactylines, in the process making a surprising discovery: the species dispersed from South America to Central America and the Caribbean over water, not land.
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  6. grindhouse
    • 2007 June 12, Dave Kehr, “New DVDs”, New York Times:
      GHOST RIDER Nicolas Cage ’s bid for grindhouse immortality, in which he plays a vengeful biker back from the dead, reissued in a double-disc set with nine minutes of new footage, $34.95; and a single-disc version for $28.95.
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  7. hitless
    • 2007 June 12, Ben Shpigel, “Their Season in an Ebb, the Mets Show No Panic”, New York Times:
      Even with Carlos Delgado hitless in his last 16 at-bats with runners in scoring position, there are too many good hitters, Manager Willie Randolph has said, for the lineup to stay cold for too long.
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  8. kilocalories
    • 2007 June 12, Anahad O’Connor, “The Claim: Brown Sugar Is Healthier Than White Sugar”, New York Times:
      According to the United States Department of Agriculture , brown sugar contains about 17 kilocalories per teaspoon, compared with 16 kilocalories per teaspoon for white sugar.
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  9. midjump
    • 2007 June 12, Alastair Macaulay, “Save the Last Dance for Covent Garden”, New York Times:
      I love the way it makes its dancers look ahead and then behind them in series, sometimes in midjump (future, past).
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  10. midpiece
    • 2007 June 12, Natalie Angier, “Sleek, Fast and Focused: The Cells That Make Dad Dad”, New York Times:
      Below the head is the midpiece, which is packed with the tiny engines called mitochondria that lend the sperm its motility, and below the midpiece is the tail, a bundle of 11 entwined filaments that thrashes and propels a sperm forward at the estimable pace of one-twelfth of an inch per minute, the equivalent of a human striding at four miles an hour.
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  11. mondongo
    • 2007 June 12, Simon Romero, “Venezuela Dances to Devilish Beat to Promote Tourism”, New York Times:
      With small crosses made from palm fronds pinned to their shirts, the devils sweated and danced into a trancelike state before resting at midday for a meal of mondongo, a soup made with slow-cooked beef tripe and pigs’ feet.
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  12. mongalla
  13. noncontact
    • 2007 June 12, Liz Robbins, “Sports Briefing”, New York Times:
      McNabb, a five-time Pro Bowl quarterback, participated in noncontact drills in his first action on the field since he tore the anterior cruciate ligament in his right knee last Nov. 19.
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  14. nonspermic
    • 2007 June 12, Natalie Angier, “Sleek, Fast and Focused: The Cells That Make Dad Dad”, New York Times:
      The average ejaculation consists mostly of a teaspoon’s worth of nonspermic seminal fluid, a viscous mix of sugars, citric acid and other ingredients designed to pamper and power the sperm cells and prepare them for difficult times ahead; the sperm proper account for only about 1 percent of the semen mass.
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  15. overallotment
  16. paradegoers
  17. partitas
    • 2007 June 12, “Arts, Briefly”, New York Times:
      Starting out last week with an empty wallet on what he calls his “Round the World and Bach” tour, Mr. Juritz, who was heard on the soundtrack of “The Last King of Scotland” and has recorded with the Sugarbabes , said he would play mainly Bach partitas.
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  18. pitchout
    • 2007 June 12, Ben Shpigel, “Celebrities Are Present; Mets Are Absent”, New York Times:
      The Mets shrewdly called a pitchout as the Dodgers squeezed, and Duca corralled Tony Abreu’s bunt and tagged out the charging Loney.
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  19. postmarketing
    • 2007 June 12, “Misdirected Studies on Avandia”, New York Times:
      The clearest lesson is that the F.D.A. needs the power to demand adequate postmarketing studies and the resources to analyze the results.
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  20. postround
  21. preshot
    • 2007 June 12, Karen Crouse, “Pettersen Adds Mind Game to Her Golf Game”, New York Times:
      When she studied the tape of those last 18 holes with her coaches, Pia Nilsson and Lynn Marriott, whose emphasis is the mental side of the game, Pettersen noticed that her preshot routine changed as the round went on.
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  22. reclad
    • 2007 June 12, David W. Dunlap, “Peel Off the Layers, and Tiffany Peeks Out”, New York Times:
      In 1953, after a passer-by was fatally injured by a piece of loose cast iron, Amalgamated had the structure stripped and reclad.
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  23. reinterviewed
  24. resentencing
    • 2007 June 12, Linda Greenhouse, “Court to Weigh Disparities in Cocaine Laws”, New York Times:
      The United States Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit, in Richmond, rejected Judge Jackson’s reasoning and ordered resentencing.
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  25. retagging
  26. signees
  27. spacewalkers
    • 2007 June 12, John Schwartz, “Shuttle Mission Extended to Fix Insulation Blanket”, New York Times:
      The shuttle brought the 17.5-ton truss up in its payload bay, and the shuttle pilot, Col. Lee Joseph Archambault of the Air Force, connected the truss to the station using the station’s robot arm before the spacewalkers stepped outside to do their electrical work.
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  28. speakership
    • 2007 June 12, Alissa J. Rubin, “Iraqi Parliament Votes to Oust Speaker Who Intimidated Members”, New York Times:
      Under the political bargain struck among Iraq’s religious and ethnic groups, the Sunni Arabs hold three leadership positions: one vice presidential slot, one deputy prime minister slot and the speakership.
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  29. suburbanization
  30. superspecialization
    • 2007 June 12, Natalie Angier, “Sleek, Fast and Focused: The Cells That Make Dad Dad”, New York Times:
      As the scientists who study male germ cells will readily attest, sperm are some of the most extraordinary cells of the body, a triumph of efficient packaging, sleek design and superspecialization.
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  31. tiang
  32. underemphasized
  33. universalist
  34. watermilfoil
    • 2007 June 12, Lisa W. Foderaro, “Battling a Nasty Green Invader From the Deep”, New York Times:
      At Augur Lake, where Mr. LaMere was hired to combat its Eurasian watermilfoil infestation, hundreds of sterile grass carp were released several years ago to eat the plants.
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Sequestered[edit]

  1. fallopian
  2. supplyin
  3. xemenia = ximenia
    • 2007 June 12, Jane E. Brody, “When School Is Out, Getting Good Food In”, New York Times:
      Part 1 is a series of easy-reader alphabet poems about common and uncommon produce, from apples to zucchini and including (wild) xemenia for the “X” page.
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