User:Visviva/NYT 20070617

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This is a list of lowercase non-hyphenated single words found in the 2007-06-17 issue of the New York Times which did not have English entries in the English Wiktionary when this list was created (2009-02-04).

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171764 tokens ‧ 126149 valid lowercase tokens ‧ 12716 types ‧ 105 (~ 0.826%) words before cleaning ‧ 

2007-06-17[edit]

  1. agarita
    • 2007 June 17, Paula Disbrowe, “The Year of the Goat”, New York Times:
      (A cow would find no joy in scampering up craggy hills to nibble nothing more than an agarita bush.)
      add
  2. anticar
  3. antirejection
    • 2007 June 17, Clark Hoyt, “The Ugly Part Wasn’t His Face”, New York Times:
      He can no longer wear either because the antirejection drugs he takes since his heart transplant cause his face to swell.
      add
  4. ballerinos
    • 2007 June 17, David Colman, “The Merman of La Scala”, New York Times:
      As aware as you are, though, consider how much more keenly the leaping ballerinas and ballerinos of the world feel the tow with every move they make.
      add
  5. barehands
  6. bigs
  7. bistate
  8. blingiest
    • 2007 June 17, Rob Walker, “Donk My Ride”, New York Times:
      The second trend is rim inflation, the more recent but evidently unflagging popularity of increasingly large wheels, especially on S.U.V.’s, associated with the blingiest manifestations of hip-hop style.
      add
  9. cabrito
  10. campo *
    • 2007 June 17, Randy Kennedy, “Venice. Art. Ubiquitous.”, New York Times:
      Around the corner of almost every campo and palazzo are works of art, readymades created by time and chance, burnished by decay.
      add
  11. carnie
  12. casunziei
    • 2007 June 17, “And Still the Champion”, New York Times:
      The restaurant’s fans would justifiably squawk if they could no longer order a dish like the casunziei, house-made ravioli stuffed with a blend of roasted beets and ricotta, then coated with melted butter and poppy seeds.
      add
  13. clubhead
    • 2007 June 17, Bloomberg News, “A Japanese Club Maker Forges a Reputation for Craftsmanship”, New York Times:
      With a thin edge on the top of the clubhead and a straight connection where the shaft meets the face, the classic look of Miura clubs tends to appeal more to purists and highly skilled players than average golfers leaning toward ease of use.
      add
  14. clubheads
  15. coachable
  16. countercharge
  17. customizer
  18. delts
    • 2007 June 17, Charles Mcgrath, “Children’s Books”, New York Times:
      He has the V-shaped torso, the lats, the delts, the bulging thigh muscles of, say, Captain America or Green Arrow.
      add
  19. developable
  20. downmouthed
    • 2007 June 17, William Safire, “Tiers in My Eyes”, New York Times:
      Today, as we approach the crucial 180th day before the first caucus, the need is evident for a unified field theory of the Great Tiersperson — the shadowy force that determines who shall be hailed as top-tier and who shall be downmouthed as second-tier, supported by a dwindling band of second-class citizens.
      add
  21. downzoning
    • 2007 June 17, Jake Mooney, “Twilight of the Trainspotters?”, New York Times:
      The Smith Street building is allowed by right under existing zoning rules, but some residents at the Monday meeting advocated downzoning and landmark protection to prevent similar future developments.
      add
  22. drifty
    • 2007 June 17, Jennifer Egan, “Woman Warriors”, New York Times:
      As a result, these stories have a pleasantly drifty, off-kilter feel, with events accreting slowly and then suddenly, sometimes randomly.
      add
  23. ephemeras
  24. flirter *
  25. gallerists
    • 2007 June 17, Elizabeth Bard, “A 50-Year-Old Upstart Redefines ‘Emerging’”, New York Times:
      His approach is best described as Madison Avenue meets the Italian Renaissance: big budgets, large teams, high-tech tools and an artist-manager equally at ease with corporate sponsors and Chelsea gallerists.
      add
  26. goopy
    • 2007 June 17, Jennifer Egan, “Woman Warriors”, New York Times:
      “She’d had some goopy notion of self-sacrifice, or maybe it was self-punishment, of making amends.
      add
  27. greenside
    • 2007 June 17, Karen Crouse, “With a Big Name Out, a New Favorite Emerges”, New York Times:
      It was a sign of how much Watson has grown as a golfer this week that he did not lose his composure in the greenside rough at No. 9.
      add
  28. guestroom
    • 2007 June 17, “Letters to the Editor”, New York Times:
      Most hotel housekeepers punch a code on the guestroom telephone, which instantly makes the room show as ready in the hotel computer.
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  29. guitarlike
  30. hambone
  31. hitless
    • 2007 June 17, Ben Shpigel, “A Final Swing Typifies Beltrán’s Struggles”, New York Times:
      This month, he is hitting .143 with one extra-base hit, a home run June 6, and is hitless in his past 15 at-bats with runners in scoring position.
      add
  32. hypergrowth
    • 2007 June 17, Erica Wagner, “Picking Up the Pieces”, New York Times:
      Online commerce has enjoyed hypergrowth, but now that growth has slowed sharply in a trend analysts call a turning point.
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  33. hyperusage
    • 2007 June 17, William Safire, “Tiers in My Eyes”, New York Times:
      An e-mailer messages: “This ‘second tier’ formulation has been around a long time, of course, but seems to be going through its hyperusage stage, which means the political P.R. people have all glommed onto it.”
      add
  34. interleague
    • 2007 June 17, The Associated Press, “10 Years On, Marlins Celebrate Unlikely Title”, New York Times:
      Many of those players — 13, to be exact — were back at the ballpark Thursday, reminiscing over that championship season and gathering for a brief on-field ceremony before the current versions of the Marlins and the Indians finished a three-game interleague series.
      add
  35. junkballers
    • 2007 June 17, Dan Rosenheck, “New Statistic Says Pitchers Need to Be Lucky and Good”, New York Times:
      Besides the occasional knuckleballer, the pitchers who dominate the leader board tend to be either extreme ground-ball pitchers, who do not give up extra-base hits (like Lowe), elite junkballers like Jamie Moyer, or simply great pitchers with moving fastballs, including Martínez, Johan Santana and Roger Clemens .
      add
  36. leatherbound
    • 2007 June 17, Dominique Browning, “Into the Wood”, New York Times:
      Then I got to the beasts — the foumart, the cur fox, the baboon, the Chillingham bull — and suddenly, gazing at a handsome illustration of a lion, I remembered, as a child, pulling down an impossibly heavy old leatherbound book of fables, full of magical drawings of wolves and crows and bears, intense in their detail while managing to leave much to the imagination.
      add
  37. lemminglike
    • 2007 June 17, William Safire, “Tiers in My Eyes”, New York Times:
      Let voters cheerfully choose their favorites with less lemminglike media intermediation.
      add
  38. liberatory
    • 2007 June 17, James Traub, “First-Family Values”, New York Times:
      The endless fight over “values” always seems to pit two idealized states against each other — the prelapsarian world of “the intact family” against the liberatory culture of “the ’60s.”
      add
  39. masa *
    • 2007 June 17, Paula Disbrowe, “The Year of the Goat”, New York Times:
      At my local supermarket in Uvalde, hindquarters of cabrito nestle alongside poultry, pork, tripe and fresh masa.
      add
  40. microcar
    • 2007 June 17, Stuart F. Brown, “Crashing Cars When They’re Still a Gleam in the Designer’s Eye”, New York Times:
      General Motors dipped its toe in these waters with a trio of pug-nosed microcar designs for the auto-show circuit this year; the tiny Mercedes-Benz Smart cars will be here next year; and Honda, Nissan and Toyota have all recently added smaller cars to their lines.
      add
  41. micropurchases
  42. midconstruction
  43. midmarket
    • 2007 June 17, Eric Wilson, “Can You Be Too Fashionable?”, New York Times:
      Long lines for the latest Karl Lagerfeld , Stella McCartney or Viktor & Rolf designs at H&M, or Vivienne Westwood shoes for Nine West at Macy’s, or for offerings from budding designers making clothes for Gap and Uniqlo, have helped midmarket stores increase sales and gain more cachet with consumers.
      add
  44. midsentence
    • 2007 June 17, Charles Mcgrath, “Endings Without Endings”, New York Times:
      Equally famously, “Finnegans Wake” ends midsentence, and so does “The Tale of Genji,” the 11th-century Japanese novel, though scholars are still debating whether that’s intentional or the result of an unfinished manuscript.
      add
  45. minicamp
  46. needlelike
    • 2007 June 17, Charles Mcgrath, “Children’s Books”, New York Times:
      Grendel here bears a passing relationship to the monster in the “Alien” movies: he has the same elongated snout, the same dripping, needlelike teeth.
      add
  47. neurotology
    • 2007 June 17, Eilene Zimmerman, “Turning Down the Volume in the Next Cubicle”, New York Times:
      A. Yes. People who have an impaired inner ear because of aging, chemotherapy, genetics or exposure to noise may not be able to hear how loud they are, said Hamid Djalilian, an assistant professor and director of otology and neurotology at the University of California , Irvine, medical center. Dr. Djalilian, who studies the ear, hearing and balance, said, “You set your voice level based on how well you actually hear yourself.”
      add
  48. noncouples
    • 2007 June 17, James Traub, “First-Family Values”, New York Times:
      Strictly for entertainment value, any of these couples, or even noncouples, should be preferable to George and Laura and Barney.
      add
  49. nonmarriages
    • 2007 June 17, James Traub, “First-Family Values”, New York Times:
      Some have quasi marriages or even nonmarriages: the recent presidential election in France pitted a man whose wife had apparently abandoned him for a fling against a woman who hasn’t married the father of her children.
      add
  50. nonshoe
    • 2007 June 17, Michael Fitzgerald, “The Shoe Changes, but the Fit Doesn’t. He Can Explain.”, New York Times:
      He says that “only a nonshoe guy” like Mr. Klein, who was watching the customization trend not just in computers but also across things like cars (Toyota ’s Scion) and television (via TiVo ), would have thought to do it.
      add
  51. opines *
    • 2007 June 17, William Safire, “Tiers in My Eyes”, New York Times:
      “The labels are made by the pundit class,” John Zogby opines.
      add
  52. opiumlike
    • 2007 June 17, Tina Rosenberg, “When Is a Pain Doctor a Drug Pusher?”, New York Times:
      But for many people in severe chronic pain, an opioid (an opiumlike compound) like OxyContin, Dilaudid, Vicodin, Percocet, oxycodone, methadone or morphine is the only thing that allows them to get out of bed.
      add
  53. overheatedness
    • 2007 June 17, Lee Siegel, “A History of Violence”, New York Times:
      But if something unreal hangs about Oates’s overheatedness, then that is what also keeps her true to the overheated, unreal-seeming nature of American life, in which Hollywood movies seem less entertainments than actual experiences.
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  54. pedestrianly
    • 2007 June 17, Lee Siegel, “A History of Violence”, New York Times:
      Her latest novel, “The Gravedigger’s Daughter,” springs to life when its central character, Rebecca Schwart, becomes pedestrianly shrewd rather than remaining superhumanly afflicted.
      add
  55. pergolalike
    • 2007 June 17, Valerie Cotsalas, “The Green Home of Their Dreams”, New York Times:
      There are solar panels built into the roof, and below the roof on the south-facing side of the house is a pergolalike ledge that is covered with a thin film that helps improve the solar panels’ output on cloudy days.
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  56. phrasemaker
    • 2007 June 17, Mary Jo Murphy, “Let Me Compare Thee to a Feral Beast”, New York Times:
      Every major point in Mr. Blair’s speech has its echo in Crabbe’s verse. Mr. Blair is no mean phrasemaker, but just as Ginger Rogers did everything Fred Astaire did only backwards and in high heels, the Reverend Crabbe gave Blair’s speech in rhymed heroic couplets.
      add
  57. pillish
    • 2007 June 17, Jennifer Egan, “Woman Warriors”, New York Times:
      One night, after What’s-his-name has been especially pillish, the young women begin picking up chunks of broken sidewalk and hurling them at him.
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  58. pityingly
    • 2007 June 17, Starlee Kine, “Chasing the Dragon”, New York Times:
      I imagine if the first-best had asked her out, or even the third-, she would have just looked at him pityingly.
      add
  59. ponytailed
    • 2007 June 17, “Love Is All Around”, New York Times:
      The couples emerge into a courtyard, where a ponytailed man named David is waiting with a Polaroid camera and an arbor of flowers; photos are $10.
      add
  60. pornophilia
    • 2007 June 17, Orlando Patterson, “Thomas Agonistes”, New York Times:
      He frequently preaches the virtues of honesty and truthfulness, yet there is now little doubt that he lied repeatedly during his confirmation hearings — not only about his pornophilia and bawdy humor but, more important, about his legal views and familiarity with cases like Roe v.
      add
  61. possesst
  62. postadolescent
    • 2007 June 17, Michael Goldfarb, “Where the Arts Were Too Liberal”, New York Times:
      The let’s-try-anything, free-thinking society of 1968 evolved into a catastrophic blend of legitimate paranoia (Nixon did keep enemies lists, and the F.B.I. did infiltrate campuses) and postadolescent melodrama.
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  63. postmatinee
  64. poufy
    • 2007 June 17, “Lauren Doyle, Andrew Exnicios”, New York Times:
      The bride who said she had always envisioned “a large church wedding with lots of attendants and big poufy dresses” scaled back her plans to a small family event at her in-laws’ house.
      add
  65. primitivist
    • 2007 June 17, Alastair Macaulay, “Design Meets Dance, and Rules Are Broken”, New York Times:
      You could make a seriously impressive pure-art show just from the posters designed for Cunningham seasons over the decades: a famous Jasper Johns target poster; a darkly primitivist one by Morris Graves; a brilliant array of concentric semicircles in primary colors by Frank Stella for a 1968 Latin American tour; a vivid abstraction by Joan Miró for a Spanish tour; a whole series by Mr. Rauschenberg; and many more.
      add
  66. promotable
    • 2007 June 17, Allen Salkin, “Manny and the Socialites: Let’s Roll”, New York Times:
      “One of the main things publishers look for, especially with potentially commercial books,” said Sara Nelson, the editor of Publishers Weekly, “is a promotable author, an author who is attractive, an author who is connected, an author who has some sort of platform and might be able to get some coverage for the book, and this author has all that.
      add
  67. readymades
    • 2007 June 17, Randy Kennedy, “Venice. Art. Ubiquitous.”, New York Times:
      Around the corner of almost every campo and palazzo are works of art, readymades created by time and chance, burnished by decay.
      add
  68. reporterly
  69. semicommercial
    • 2007 June 17, Joyce Cohen, “Roommates Who Almost Weren’t”, New York Times:
      A Havemeyer Street apartment was near popular bars, but it was in a walk-up; An apartment on South First Street was still being renovated; A Maujer Street apartment was spacious, though also on a semicommercial block; Chris Roan, left, and Justin Fluck settle into their Brooklyn flat after a long search.
      add
  70. shticky
    • 2007 June 17, Bob Morris, “Mirth, in Honor of Dad”, New York Times:
      So I handed out lyrics by Allan Sherman, the shticky 1960s parody writer who my father revered and channeled to the end.
      add
  71. sinkerball
  72. sixtyish
    • 2007 June 17, Alessandra Stanley, “In the Prime of Their Time”, New York Times:
      Then Diane Keaton , sixtyish, made a comeback with AARP romantic comedies, from “Something’s Got to Give” to “Because I Said So.”
      add
  73. snakeskin
    • 2007 June 17, Allen Salkin, “Manny and the Socialites: Let’s Roll”, New York Times:
      Ms. Peterson paid the socialites, who also include Jennifer Creel and Cristina Greeven Cuomo, the vice chairwoman of Niche Media, in a form of currency she said they would understand: She bought them each a snakeskin clutch from Bergdorf Goodman.
      add
  74. sogari
    • 2007 June 17, Sung J. Woo, “Like Father?”, New York Times:
      In those family photo albums from Korea, there were a large number of my father fishing in freestone rivers for sogari, the mandarin fish, and now, on our days off from the store, we drove to the piers of Long Branch and fished.
      add
  75. songful
  76. spiegeltent
    • 2007 June 17, Joy Goodwin, “Willkommen! Life Is a Spiegeltent, Old Chum”, New York Times:
      Inside the ornate, intimate spiegeltent (from the Flemish for “tent of mirrors”) none of the 250 chairs ringing the stage was more than 20 feet from the performers, and a mood of Weimar decadence prevailed.
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  77. spiegeltents
  78. storybookish
    • 2007 June 17, Charles Mcgrath, “Children’s Books”, New York Times:
      The illustrations, by Michael Foreman, are a little pallid and storybookish, with at least one — a depiction of Grendel’s mother as a grass-skirted fashion disaster with scaly green breasts — that is apt to elicit snickers rather than shudders.
      add
  79. superhumanly
    • 2007 June 17, Lee Siegel, “A History of Violence”, New York Times:
      Her latest novel, “The Gravedigger’s Daughter,” springs to life when its central character, Rebecca Schwart, becomes pedestrianly shrewd rather than remaining superhumanly afflicted.
      add
  80. swoony
    • 2007 June 17, Alessandra Stanley, “In the Prime of Their Time”, New York Times:
      (“Grey’s Anatomy” tried to fill the “Sex and the City” gap by mixing a playful approach to sex with a swoony look at love, and ended up taking adult romance so seriously that it veered into ludicrous melodrama.)
      add
  81. tiersmanship
    • 2007 June 17, William Safire, “Tiers in My Eyes”, New York Times:
      3) Is upward or downward mobility possible in a polity afflicted with tiersmanship?
      add
  82. tonier
    • 2007 June 17, Dominique Browning, “Into the Wood”, New York Times:
      There was a time when the woodcut (and its tonier relative, the copperplate) was the only way to illustrate anything from a book to a bar bill to a bank note.
      add
  83. treasurable
    • 2007 June 17, The New York Times, “While Lyrical Moments Abound, Tension Sometimes Simmers”, New York Times:
      Last encountered in a treasurable recording of Albéniz’s “Iberia” from Hyperion, Mr. Hamelin has based a highly productive career mostly on big Romantic and 20th-century works, often little known if at all.
      add
  84. uncollaborative
    • 2007 June 17, Kevin Phillips, “Reagan on Reagan”, New York Times:
      Reagan thought Kemp was particularly uncollaborative and unhelpful.
      add
  85. underheard
  86. unpersuasively
    • 2007 June 17, “Why Protect Shady Gun Dealers?”, New York Times:
      Supporters of the Tiahrt amendment contend, unpersuasively, that broader release of the dealer information would jeopardize investigations.
      add
  87. unpickled
  88. unrufflable
    • 2007 June 17, Robert Sullivan, “Air Power”, New York Times:
      Even for a wind book, there’s too much about Romney’s unrufflable hair.
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  89. unspiced
  90. vends *
  91. veritas *
    • 2007 June 17, Dwight Garner, “Inside the List”, New York Times:
      Eisler is willing to suffer for veritas.
      add
  92. waspy

Sequestered[edit]

  1. blooperization
    • 2007 June 17, William Safire, “Tiers in My Eyes”, New York Times:
      Answers: Media “buzz”; a hot issue or Reaganesque phrase in the “cattle show” appearances; a bounce in fund-raising; or the blooperization of a top-tier candidate followed by the Great Tiersperson’s need to fill that third slot.
      add
  2. frindle
  3. huckapoo (pop group, should be capitalised)
  4. zion