User:Visviva/NYT 20070624

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This is a list of lowercase non-hyphenated single words found in the 2007-06-24 issue of the New York Times which did not have English entries in the English Wiktionary when this list was created (2009-02-04).

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167456 tokens ‧ 123545 valid lowercase tokens ‧ 12987 types ‧ 118 (~ 0.909%) words before cleaning ‧ 

2007-06-24[edit]

  1. adventurings
    • 2007 June 24, David Leavitt, “Still More Tales of the City”, New York Times:
      Shawna has grown up into a sort of Outward Bound explorer of the erotic wilderness, whose adventurings — recounted on a widely read blog — include a stint working at “the Lusty Lady, a peep show in North Beach that recently became the nation’s first worker-owned strip club.”
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  2. agritourists
  3. antiestablishment
    • 2007 June 24, Joe Rhodes, “A Nerd Gone Wild Gives Voice to His Inner Rat”, New York Times:
      Asked whether he worries about losing his antiestablishment aura or, worse yet, being accused of selling out, he said: “I think it depends on what you do with your success.
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  4. artisanship
    • 2007 June 24, Tania Leah Haas, “In Homage to Buddha, a Splash of Freedom”, New York Times:
      Because Gyatso and his wife worship at home, they have converted the modest room into a showroom of Tibetan artisanship and veneration.
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  5. autospeak
    • 2007 June 24, Nick Kurczewski, “A Minivan That Is Actually Mini”, New York Times:
      WHAT you call the Kia Rondo depends on how far you bend to the fickle winds of autospeak.
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  6. bierstube
    • 2007 June 24, “Letters to the Editor”, New York Times:
      Downstairs was a bierstube, where Cologne’s signature beer, Kölsch, was served in small, cylindrical glasses.
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  7. bohemia
  8. brut *
    • 2007 June 24, Howard G. Goldberg, “Effervescence From Bordeaux”, New York Times:
      Jaillance’s nonvintage Cuvée de l’Abbaye, produced there, is a smarter buy than many costly brut Champagnes.
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  9. buyable
    • 2007 June 24, Rob Walker, “Trading Partners”, New York Times:
      Meanwhile, they need to make a living — possibly by finding an audience for some buyable form of that creativity.
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  10. candylike
    • 2007 June 24, Phil Patton, “Cars for Girls: Dolls Are Included”, New York Times:
      This may be so, but Mattel is taking no chances: each car comes with a doll, the colors are candylike tones accented with glitter and names include the cosmetic-sounding Bling ’N Blush, Glitter Peach and Splashin’ Pink.
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  11. clubbable
  12. collegebound
    • 2007 June 24, Peter Sagal, “Former-Self Defense”, New York Times:
      One summer evening , years ago, when I was a nice, collegebound high-school senior, my girlfriend and I were wandering around the sidewalks of a closed shopping center along with some other nice, collegebound seniors.
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  13. corndogs
  14. cousinhood
    • 2007 June 24, Christopher Gray, “A Preservation Handbook in a Few Short Blocks”, New York Times:
      At 100th Street, 801 and 817 West End, both designed in 1910 for Arlington and Harvey Hall by Neville & Bagge, show how a pair of identical twins can get to distant cousinhood in a generation or two.
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  15. crosspipes
    • 2007 June 24, Michael Pollak, “Graffiti Secrets”, New York Times:
      The English sparrow, another abundant city species, also loves streetlights and lampposts, especially those with crosspipes open at the ends.
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  16. cyberconflict
    • 2007 June 24, John Schwartz, “When Computers Attack”, New York Times:
      An all-out cyberconflict could “could have huge impacts,” said Danny McPherson, an expert with Arbor Networks.
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  17. darty
    • 2007 June 24, Nick Kurczewski, “A Minivan That Is Actually Mini”, New York Times:
      Still, while darty steering is fun in a sports car like the Miata, in a people mover like the Mazda 5 you may come to feel you are being pulled by an overeager puppy on a short leash.
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  18. deteriorative
    • 2007 June 24, Paul Von Zielbauer, “A Marine Tutorial on Media ‘Spin’”, New York Times:
      This schema is especially fruitful for Mr. McGirk because if he tries to adapt our situation to this model it simultaneously exposes a “war crime cover-up” and shows the deteriorative (albeit exaggerated) effects of war on U.S. marines (the best of the best), which could be expanded by the general press as a testament for why the U.S. should pull out of Iraq.
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  19. exonerations
    • 2007 June 24, Adam Liptak, “Prosecutor Becomes Prosecuted”, New York Times:
      There have been about 120 death-row exonerations since the Supreme Court reinstituted the death penalty in 1976, said Samuel R. Gross, a law professor at the University of Michigan .
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  20. experimentalism
    • 2007 June 24, Tina Brown, “Couples”, New York Times:
      These unions were not arrangements in any static sense; they were vibrant works in progress, exercises in passionate experimentalism.
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  21. fairylike
    • 2007 June 24, George Johnson, “Meta Physicists”, New York Times:
      Faust’s tormented love, Gretchen, appeared as the fairylike neutrino.
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  22. fixedness
    • 2007 June 24, Christopher Clarey, “Where the America’s Cup First Set Sail”, New York Times:
      “The men were motionless as statues, with their eager eyes fastened upon the Laverock with a fixedness and intensity that seemed almost unnatural,” Stevens said, adding: “We worked quickly and surely to windward of her wake.
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  23. flirtier
    • 2007 June 24, Ellen Tien, “A Weekend Retreat”, New York Times:
      In knits and weaves, these cool little numbers are flirtier than denim, breezy to reach for and easy to pack.
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  24. flourlike
    • 2007 June 24, Jay Romano, “Beating Insects to the Punch”, New York Times:
      Signs of infestation are small round holes, ranging in size from a pinhead to a BB, with fine, flourlike wood powder coming out of them.
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  25. frontotemporal
    • 2007 June 24, Katherine Nichols, “Diminishing Returns”, New York Times:
      I’d never heard of primary progressive aphasia, a type of frontotemporal dementia that can devastate language skills and incite behavior mistaken for psychiatric disorders.
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  26. fusionlike
  27. gabacho *
    • 2007 June 24, Mireya Navarro, “The Mexican Will See You Now”, New York Times:
      Yet when Mexicans follow in the footsteps of our gabacho forefathers, we accuse them of lacking self-motivation and want to shut down the border.”
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  28. ganas *
    • 2007 June 24, Emily Brady, “When the Diploma Is Just a Dream”, New York Times:
      “It’s an immigrant community that has a lot of ganas — a lot of desire to move ahead,” Professor Smith said of Mexicans in New York.
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  29. graspingly
    • 2007 June 24, A. A. Gill, “Tony Blair, Three-Time Loser”, New York Times:
      British political scandals tend to be contemptibly below the belt, sniggerably spittle-flecked and seedy, rather than graspingly venal or power-crazed.
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  30. groanworthy
  31. groundout
    • 2007 June 24, The Associated Press, “Cox Ties Record for Ejections as Braves Lose to the Tigers”, New York Times:
      Alfonso Soriano led off the game with a homer for the second straight day, and the White Sox tied the score in the bottom of the first when Scott Podsednik scored on Jim Thome’s groundout.
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  32. grumbly
    • 2007 June 24, Joshua Yaffa, “The Greenest Thumb”, New York Times:
      If, as its practitioners are fond of claiming, gardening is the slowest-moving fine art, Mr. Ramlakhan is its Jackson Pollock , grumbly and cocksure, producing brilliant work while alienating many of those who could appreciate it.
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  33. gutturals
    • 2007 June 24, Ian Rankin, “‘Doors Open’”, New York Times:
      Since then it had been the grunts and gutturals and a steady stream of nicotine.
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  34. intercommunal
    • 2007 June 24, Noah Feldman, “Piece Process”, New York Times:
      We are far enough into the Baghdad surge to know that the most it will accomplish is to slow down the internecine conflict and perhaps contain the intercommunal violence so as to avoid all-out genocidal war.
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  35. interleague
    • 2007 June 24, The Associated Press, “Reliever Comes Clean, Then Comes Through”, New York Times:
      In his first 10 outings and heading into a weekend interleague series with the Mets at Shea Stadium, he had not allowed a run over 12 1/3 innings, had stranded all seven of his inherited base runners and had saved two games in two opportunities.
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  36. interreligious
    • 2007 June 24, The Associated Press, “Blair and Pope Discuss Future of the Mideast”, New York Times:
      ROME, June 23 (AP) — The Vatican bid farewell on Saturday to Tony Blair as prime minister of Britain, wishing him well on what it said were his plans to work for Middle East peace and interreligious dialogue.
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  37. judgeships
  38. karmas
    • 2007 June 24, Tania Leah Haas, “In Homage to Buddha, a Splash of Freedom”, New York Times:
      As he did so, he murmured the words “Om mani padme hum,” the mantra of compassion, for liberation from all negative karmas.
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  39. keiretsu
  40. keyless
  41. knickknack *
    • 2007 June 24, Peter Sagal, “Former-Self Defense”, New York Times:
      I asked the instructor if there was a proper technique for defending yourself against an attacker who had you by the throat and was holding you up against a knickknack shop.
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  42. lexie
    • 2007 June 24, William Safire, “One-Off”, New York Times:
      That lone lexie of the future, desperately trying to marshal resistance to the Visigoths of vocabulary, will be hooted at as a one-off .
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  43. masaledar
    • 2007 June 24, “All the World’s a Menu”, New York Times:
      The lamb chops masaledar luxuriate in a bath of yogurt, garlic, ginger, ground cashews and spices for more than a day before they are skewered and plunged into the tandoor.
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  44. megacorporations
    • 2007 June 24, “Letters”, New York Times:
      Continuing with his example, it is worth noting that Clemens works for an association that has a virtual monopoly on professional baseball and that a few dozen megacorporations and their major shareholders effectively control the viewing rights to ballgames, the teams, the stadiums, advertising space during games and most other major profit opportunities associated with it.
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  45. midstride
    • 2007 June 24, Ron Stodghill, “The Florsheims, Back in Their Own Shoes”, New York Times:
      AS Mr. Florsheim paces around his hotel room, he stops midstride and points at the calfskin toe of his 10-D, low-slung brown leather loafer.
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  46. minicamp
  47. multicar
  48. multiroom
    • 2007 June 24, Michelle Higgins, “The Accountants Have Taken Over the Pool”, New York Times:
      Canoe Bay, the small luxury resort in Wisconsin , has added new multiroom cottages that come with meeting spaces and kitchens for catering.
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  49. muntins
    • 2007 June 24, Suzanne Slesin, “Two Loft Conversions, Two Points of View”, New York Times:
      Stephen Byrns, one of the partners in BKSK Architects, the New York firm that handled the building’s renovation, pointed out the oil-rubbed bronze doorknobs as well as his favorite architectural detail: the metal-frame windows’ muntins, their metal crossbars.
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  50. nonconfrontational
    • 2007 June 24, Pam Belluck, “Catholic Lay Group Tests a Strategy Change”, New York Times:
      Formed five years ago when two dozen suburban Boston parishioners gathered in anguish over the emerging abuse crisis, its message — “Keep the Faith, Change the Church” — and nonconfrontational approach to church leaders attracted 35,000 worldwide members, according to the group.
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  51. nonmarket
    • 2007 June 24, “Letters”, New York Times:
      In fact, it is arguably the nonmarket orientation (monopoly characteristics) of professional baseball that has sent players’ earnings, team owners’ profits and companies’ market valuations (and dividends) into the stratosphere.
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  52. nonskiers
  53. operagoing
    • 2007 June 24, Anne Midgette, “Music That Thinks Outside the Chamber”, New York Times:
      MY epiphany came when I told a friend I was going to a chamber music concert, and she — well-educated, well-heeled, operagoing — made a throwing-up gesture into her hand.
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  54. ovaryless
    • 2007 June 24, Kate Mcgovern, “My Virginity Went From Choice to Burden”, New York Times:
      When I returned to his office, he laughed — a haughty kind of chuckle that made me momentarily hate him and all his ovaryless kind.
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  55. panoramically
    • 2007 June 24, A. A. Gill, “Tony Blair, Three-Time Loser”, New York Times:
      After 10 years of economic growth, social ease, gently rising aspiration, cultural exuberance, financial security, dropping unemployment, manageable taxes and record spending on education and health, 10 years in which the biggest disturbances had been over fox hunting, Mr. Blair has managed to get himself roundly, fundamentally, panoramically hated at home.
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  56. postconcert
    • 2007 June 24, Brian Wise, “Segue From ‘Gigi’ to Geek-Chic Indie Rock”, New York Times:
      This summer, bands like the baroque poppers the Decemberists and the lush folk rocker Bright Eyes will join orchestras in amphitheaters and parks, where audiences typically sip chardonnay on the lawn and watch postconcert fireworks.
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  57. postdeal
    • 2007 June 24, Kelley Holland, “Life After a Merger: Learning on Both Sides”, New York Times:
      I.B.M. , which has undertaken more than 60 acquisitions in the last five years, has a small team of employees who work full time on postdeal issues, according to Randy MacDonald, global director of human resources.
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  58. postmerger
    • 2007 June 24, Kelley Holland, “Life After a Merger: Learning on Both Sides”, New York Times:
      To avoid situations like this, I.B.M. sends a group of postmerger specialists to work at an acquired company, doing due diligence and assessing the culture of the organization and key employees’ strengths.
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  59. poufy
  60. prama
  61. predissected
    • 2007 June 24, Mary Roach, “Love and Human Remains”, New York Times:
      There has been a trend among medical schools to eliminate the gross anatomy lab dissection, replacing it with a (far less time-consuming) study of predissected, preserved prosections and computerized simulations.
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  62. premarriage
  63. promgoers
  64. prosections
    • 2007 June 24, Mary Roach, “Love and Human Remains”, New York Times:
      There has been a trend among medical schools to eliminate the gross anatomy lab dissection, replacing it with a (far less time-consuming) study of predissected, preserved prosections and computerized simulations.
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  65. prosthodontics
    • 2007 June 24, “Sarah Lukash, Robert Berg”, New York Times:
      The bridegroom, 30, received a postgraduate specialty certificate in prosthodontics this month from the Albert Einstein College of Medicine.
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  66. quoining
  67. recontextualized
  68. refuelers
  69. rehabilitator
    • 2007 June 24, Jennifer Bleyer, “Two Swans Left a Void; Dozens Fill It With Grace”, New York Times:
      Eggs belonging to the swan couple were rescued and sent to a wildlife rehabilitator upstate in Putnam County, where six cygnets hatched two weeks later.
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  70. repointing
    • 2007 June 24, Christopher Gray, “A Preservation Handbook in a Few Short Blocks”, New York Times:
      With careless repointing, a bare scar instead of a cornice, and a filmy slush of waterproofing over its red brick, No. 817 is a shadow of its intact sibling, whose mortar is still deeply raked below the surface, its original carbon-black coloring enriching the red brick, not competing with it.
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  71. rumbly
    • 2007 June 24, Negar Azimi, “Hard Realities of Soft Power”, New York Times:
      His voice is pleasantly rumbly; his smile is so wide that it seems to have been drawn onto his face with a crayon.
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  72. sacrospinous
    • 2007 June 24, Mary Roach, “Love and Human Remains”, New York Times:
      The Dissector spits out Latin terms for ligaments — sacrospinous, sacrotuberous; Montross hears them “like a call to prayer.”
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  73. sacrotuberous
    • 2007 June 24, Mary Roach, “Love and Human Remains”, New York Times:
      The Dissector spits out Latin terms for ligaments — sacrospinous, sacrotuberous; Montross hears them “like a call to prayer.”
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  74. sceptred
    • 2007 June 24, A. A. Gill, “Tony Blair, Three-Time Loser”, New York Times:
      TO mark Tony Blair’s departure as Britain’s prime minister, the Downing Street kitchen coven of opinion masseurs, social soothsayers and political weather forecasters decided that he should make a farewell trip around this sceptred isle in a lap of honor, taking in schools, hospitals, art centers, nature reserves and barracks, giving “real people,” as politicians like to refer to them, a chance to say thank you and get their backs patted and shoulders squeezed.
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  75. semisecret
    • 2007 June 24, Marvin Kitman, “The Boondocks”, New York Times:
      The highway also passes by Area 51, a semisecret government test facility where the stealth bomber was developed.
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  76. shorefront
    • 2007 June 24, Jennifer Bleyer, “Two Swans Left a Void; Dozens Fill It With Grace”, New York Times:
      In May 2005, residents of Edgewater Park, a spit of a neighborhood in the southeast Bronx, were stunned to learn that a pair of mute swans who lived in their shorefront community had been murdered.
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  77. sinuously
    • 2007 June 24, David Colman, “Doesn’t Ask, Doesn’t Tell”, New York Times:
      And luckily, the dragon, which has a Mae Westian quality, sinuously standing with one flipper on a swiveling hip, has weathered every curve.
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  78. sniggerably
    • 2007 June 24, A. A. Gill, “Tony Blair, Three-Time Loser”, New York Times:
      British political scandals tend to be contemptibly below the belt, sniggerably spittle-flecked and seedy, rather than graspingly venal or power-crazed.
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  79. spiderlike
    • 2007 June 24, Christopher Gray, “A Preservation Handbook in a Few Short Blocks”, New York Times:
      There is a particularly scary spiderlike specimen below the second window to the left of the main entrance, and the whorls and patterns even run through the building’s cornerstone.
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  80. starmaking
    • 2007 June 24, Pete Thamel, “Marketing All-Star Is Ready to Relax”, New York Times:
      Reebok, the most recent sponsor of ABCD, will be holding a camp at Philadelphia University known as Rbk U, which will have a decidedly lower emphasis on starmaking than ABCD did.
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  81. stoneworkers
    • 2007 June 24, Arthur Lubow, “The Possessed”, New York Times:
      To honor the spirits that take form as mountains, the Inca stoneworkers carved rock outcrops to replicate their shapes.
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  82. stube
    • 2007 June 24, “Letters to the Editor”, New York Times:
      What still astonishes me is that German businessmen wearing suits would come into the stube in the morning and down one small glass of Kölsch on their way to work.
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  83. subcuisine
    • 2007 June 24, “All the World’s a Menu”, New York Times:
      The tandoor, the top-loading oven from which a whole subcuisine of Indian food springs, gets superhot: At Earthen Oven, Durga Prasad’s tandoor reaches 700 degrees.
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  84. subregional
    • 2007 June 24, The Associated Press, “New Orleans Universities Try to Restore Fan Interest”, New York Times:
      ¶The first- and second-round N.C.A.A. tournament basketball games at New Orleans Arena in March drew the lowest attendance in terms of percentage of capacity of any subregional in the seven years since the advent of scheduling teams closer to home, designed to produce better crowds.
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  85. subtheme
    • 2007 June 24, Randall Stross, “The Human Touch That May Loosen Google’s Grip”, New York Times:
      Each takes up only one line; grouped by subtheme, they are easier to skim than the 12 sites that fill the entire first page of Google’s search results.
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  86. subthemes
    • 2007 June 24, Randall Stross, “The Human Touch That May Loosen Google’s Grip”, New York Times:
      A hand-built Mahalo search-results page has one conspicuous advantage over Google’s: grouping into subthemes, which make a page of links much easier to scan and to find items of particular interest.
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  87. superhot
    • 2007 June 24, “All the World’s a Menu”, New York Times:
      The tandoor, the top-loading oven from which a whole subcuisine of Indian food springs, gets superhot: At Earthen Oven, Durga Prasad’s tandoor reaches 700 degrees.
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  88. superskinny
    • 2007 June 24, Mark Jacobs, “Branded”, New York Times:
      Then there is Wrangler47, the company’s three-year-old premium brand, carried in stores like Barneys New York and Scoop; it includes fashionable items like micro-miniskirts and the ubiquitous superskinny hipster jeans.
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  89. surfside
    • 2007 June 24, Allen Salkin, “When Boys of Summer Linger Till Autumn”, New York Times:
      These surfside Peter Pans survey each summer’s crop of young women on the sand like an incoming class of freshman co-eds on the quad.
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  90. thimerasol
  91. toastmastering
    • 2007 June 24, Thomas Mallon, “The President’s Man”, New York Times:
      The book contains plenty of errors — surely Mrs. Kennedy was not wearing her pink pillbox hat the night before Dallas, any more than Valenti could have landed at Charles de Gaulle Airport while de Gaulle was still alive — but the mistakes tend to get lost, along with much else of potential substance, in the relentless toastmastering of the author’s style.
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  92. touchpoint
    • 2007 June 24, Pamela Paul, “What to Expect When Expecting? A Whole Lot of Loot”, New York Times:
      “Smart retailers see baby registries as an initial touchpoint and a way to grow with a woman and her family,” said David Morris, senior research analyst at Mintel.
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  93. trackside
  94. transgressiveness
    • 2007 June 24, David Leavitt, “Still More Tales of the City”, New York Times:
      And indeed, if I have a complaint about “Michael Tolliver Lives,” it may be that for all the pleasure it takes in its own transgressiveness, it comes off as a little too nice.
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  95. trendsetting
    • 2007 June 24, Dan Shaw, “An Ancient Studio for an Even Older Craft”, New York Times:
      By 1989, she was selling to Zona, the trendsetting home-furnishings boutique in SoHo, where customers used to wait in line to get inside on holiday weekends.
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  96. tres *
    • 2007 June 24, Nate Chinen, “Experimental Rock, Righteous Rap, Radical Flamenco”, New York Times:
      Though the ensemble functions as a tribute to the pioneering Gypsy guitarist Diego del Gastor, it also makes at least one radical modification: Its most prominent timbre is the Cuban tres, a string instrument lifted from another latitude and culture.
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  97. unamended
  98. uncorseted
    • 2007 June 24, Dennis Lim, “Sexy, Scary and Often Naked: That’s Acting!”, New York Times:
      In her decidedly uncorseted costume drama, Ms. Breillat positions Ms. Argento as a destabilizing force of nature, peeling away clothes and hypocrisies in a single swoop. Mr. Assayas creates a fanboy valentine, testing his star’s talent for erotic bravado and athletic action, even in lingerie and spike heels.
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  99. unknowability
    • 2007 June 24, Tina Brown, “Couples”, New York Times:
      At the end of her book we feel we know these couples as intimately as if we were part of their circle, but the ultimate nature of each relationship is left inviolate in its unknowability.
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  100. unnibbled
    • 2007 June 24, William Safire, “One-Off”, New York Times:
      But now that the pushovers of permissiveness have sliced and diced the solitary meaning of unique with wimpy adverbs, a fresh expression of splendid singularity, as yet unnibbled by the minnows of murkiness, is welcome.
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  101. unplaceable
    • 2007 June 24, Dennis Lim, “Sexy, Scary and Often Naked: That’s Acting!”, New York Times:
      “An Old Mistress” and “Boarding Gate” feature the trademarks that have made her an all-purpose mystery lady — her salacious scowl, her damaged-goods vulnerability, her unplaceable exoticism, her many tattoos — while also throwing fresh challenges in her path.
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  102. unprosperous
    • 2007 June 24, Madison Smartt Bell, “The Fugitive”, New York Times:
      She was the property of Edward Brodess, an unprosperous farmer who staved off bankruptcy by hiring out or selling his slaves.
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  103. unvested
    • 2007 June 24, Nelson D. Schwartz, “Who Might Escape Bausch Without a Scratch?”, New York Times:
      “Private equity and management do a deal which is good for both, because management gets to keep their jobs and get their unvested options, while private equity gets a good price.
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  104. usagists
    • 2007 June 24, William Safire, “One-Off”, New York Times:
      For a century, usagists have been holding this line: unique is unique , an absolute adjective like pregnant , no degrees awarded, not to be attacked with modifiers.
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  105. vacherin
  106. vasovagal
    • 2007 June 24, Kate Mcgovern, “My Virginity Went From Choice to Burden”, New York Times:
      In the past, my occasional fainting spells — officially known as vasovagal syncope — had been precipitated by specific sources of pain: if I had a bad stomachache, say, or twisted my neck oddly.
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  107. windborne
    • 2007 June 24, Nate Chinen, “Experimental Rock, Righteous Rap, Radical Flamenco”, New York Times:
      “Scenarios” (ObliqSound) consists of duets with the harmonica player Grégoire Maret, a former Dapp Theory collaborator, and the results often sound spry and windborne.
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Sequestered[edit]

  1. detempled
  2. ganglandish
    • 2007 June 24, Stephen Prothero, “Kiss and Make Up”, New York Times:
      The other disciples, who go by the ganglandish name “the 12,” are murderers and fools.
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  3. kraft *