User:Visviva/NYT 20070701

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This is a list of lowercase non-hyphenated single words found in the 2007-07-01 issue of the New York Times which did not have English entries in the English Wiktionary when this list was created (2009-02-04).

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165720 tokens ‧ 121558 valid lowercase tokens ‧ 12621 types ‧ 90 (~ 0.713%) words before cleaning ‧ 

2007-07-01[edit]

  1. baitfish
    • 2007 July 1, Saki Knafo, “Reeling In a Living on the East River”, New York Times:
      Just a few blocks from Mr. Wong’s store, on a gloomy esplanade under the Franklin D. Roosevelt Drive, a man named Jack Chai wearing mismatched Army fatigues crouched with a box cutter and hacked a silvery baitfish into bloody chunks.
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  2. butterhead
    • 2007 July 1, Jennifer Bleyer, “Lucy in the Greenmarket With Fava Beans”, New York Times:
      “Look at these interesting lettuces,” Ms. Wollin said, examining tufts of speckled romaine, red oak leaf and butterhead lettuce with a gem dealer’s eye.
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  3. buzzy
    • 2007 July 1, Kelefa Sanneh, “Sugar Sugar, Shake Shake and, Yes!, Viking Metal”, New York Times:
      Their current single is “Potential Breakup Song,” a sugar-rush tantrum driven by a buzzy bass line, skittering drums and an expression of romantic frustration appropriate for all ages: “I want my stuff back.”
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  4. calendarless
    • 2007 July 1, Carol Muske-Dukes, “The Prisoners Time Forgot”, New York Times:
      There they were, prostitutes, shoplifters, drug-users, teetering on the brink of an Aug. 19 or a Dec. 17, a Feb. 1 or a June 6, tumbling, then plummeting into uncharted, calendarless space.
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  5. calendrics
    • 2007 July 1, Benjamin Anastas, “The Final Days”, New York Times:
      Daniel Pinchbeck, author of the alternative-culture best seller “2012: The Return of Quetzalcoatl” — and a guest on “Coast to Coast AM” — has introduced a young and savvy audience to the school of millenarian thinking that has gathered around Mayan calendrics.
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  6. caregiving
    • 2007 July 1, “Letters”, New York Times:
      The crux of nontechnical medical caregiving — action with compassion — is based on an old adage: Listen to the patient; he is telling you his diagnosis.
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  7. castmates
    • 2007 July 1, Zachary Pincus-Roth, “Enter Acting, Pursued by Applause”, New York Times:
      In “Curtains” David Hyde Pierce , best known for his role on “Frasier,” certainly gets it, but so do some of his Broadway veteran castmates, like Debra Monk and Karen Ziemba.
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  8. chaats
    • 2007 July 1, “Far East of the U.N.”, New York Times:
      The menu has a large selection of chaats, India’s national snacks, including smashed samosa topped with mildly spiced chickpeas, mint sauce, yogurt and tamarind sauce.
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  9. chicanes
  10. chinny
    • 2007 July 1, Alastair Macaulay, “Steps That Outshine Big City’s Bright Lights”, New York Times:
      It was terrific fun to see such opposites together: Ms. Bouder is a chinny brunette, with eyes that narrow when she smiles, a bold and witty dancer who won’t wear her evidently large heart on her sleeve, while Ms. Reichlen is a blond, doe-eyed, leggy nymph, dewy and lyrical even in the most impersonal situations.
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  11. concours *
  12. cosiness
    • 2007 July 1, “The Mullahs Reap What They Sow”, New York Times:
      It offers them the Gemutlichkeit [cosiness] that they need to survive in this crazy world.”
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  13. coupledom
    • 2007 July 1, Sam Roberts, “The Shelf Life of Bliss”, New York Times:
      The research doesn’t address whether blissful 21st-century relationships are any more or less enduring than they were in the 20th century, so it may be that happy coupledom always came with a three-year expiration date.
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  14. crescendoed
    • 2007 July 1, Daphne Merkin, “The Nonconformist”, New York Times:
      This campaign — more an assault than a campaign — to push, prod and expensively tutor one’s teenager into the most auspicious, cocktail-party-ready of colleges has crescendoed in the last few years, fueled by the growing belief on the part of upper-middle-class parents that there are no ungifted offspring in their gilded ranks.
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  15. crimsons
    • 2007 July 1, Kevin Patterson, “Market Forces”, New York Times:
      The crimsons of the Mazar-i-Sharif carpets and the patterns of the Bamiyan — “You know Bamiyan, sir?
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  16. cryptorealist
    • 2007 July 1, Jonathan Freedland, “Madame Secretary”, New York Times:
      She was, first, a realist, then a neoconservative enabler as Bush’s national security adviser and now a pragmatic cryptorealist as secretary of state (pushing for talks with Iran, for example).
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  17. cyberconversation
    • 2007 July 1, Jonathan Dee, “All the News That’s Fit to Print Out”, New York Times:
      Over the next several hours, in constant cyberconversation with an ever-growing pack of other self-appointed editors, Gracenotes — whose real name is Matthew Gruen — expanded and corrected this stub 59 times, ultimately shaping it into a respectable, balanced and even footnoted 50-line account of that day’s major development in the war on terror.
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  18. daytraders
    • 2007 July 1, Adam Bryant, “iSee Into the Future, Therefore iAm”, New York Times:
      But now people are always on their toes to spot the next trend early, particularly if it means they can make a fast buck — the tech-stock boom, a hot housing market, poker (online gambling was a particularly easy transition for all those former daytraders), and hedge funds for people wealthy enough to gain access.
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  19. exsanguine
    • 2007 July 1, Kevin Patterson, “Market Forces”, New York Times:
      The wounded were brought to us, nearly frozen and exsanguine after a six-hour extraction.
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  20. fractionals
    • 2007 July 1, Eilene Zimmerman, “If One Vacation Home Won’t Do, How About a Bunch?”, New York Times:
      Time shares and fractionals differ in the amount of time that buyers receive: a time-share purchase is typically a week, whereas a fractional purchase is usually three or four weeks.
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  21. goops
    • 2007 July 1, Jake Mooney, “For Aficionados of Shaving, la Crème de la Crème”, New York Times:
      These are fellows who shun the three-, four- and five-blade contraptions and canned goops for an older mode of shaving that they insist remains the ideal: a straight razor or a safety razor with a double-edged blade, and a fine English cream lathered and applied with a badger-hair brush.
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  22. greenmarkets
    • 2007 July 1, Jennifer Bleyer, “Lucy in the Greenmarket With Fava Beans”, New York Times:
      Lucy Wollin, one of the more ardent fans of the city’s greenmarkets, arrived at the Union Square Greenmarket clad in comfortable black sandals with a burlap sack over her shoulder, ready to appraise the day’s offerings.
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  23. greenside
    • 2007 July 1, Damon Hack, “Long Day at U.S. Open for Everyone Except Wie”, New York Times:
      After hitting a driver into the rough to the right of the fairway on the par-4 18th hole, Wie winced when she hit her approach shot out of the rough and into a greenside bunker.
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  24. handgrips
    • 2007 July 1, Matthew L. Wald, “For Riders, Risk Is Growing”, New York Times:
      At least for now, the air bag is an option only on the big Gold Wing touring bikes, which cost nearly $25,000 fully equipped with features like heated handgrips and antilock brakes.
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  25. hennaed
  26. hitless
    • 2007 July 1, David Picker, “Nothing Is Working for the Yankees”, New York Times:
      Derek Jeter, who struck out swinging in the first, went 0 for 4 Saturday and is hitless in eight at-bats in the first two games of the Yankees’ series against Oakland.
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  27. hitmaker
  28. horseplayers
    • 2007 July 1, Vincent M. Mallozzi, “Handicapping the Handicappers”, New York Times:
      Trailing a field of talented horseplayers that day, he made a few shrewd picks to move ahead, then held on down the stretch to earn $50,000.
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  29. interiority
  30. iz *
  31. kakegoe
    • 2007 July 1, Zachary Pincus-Roth, “Enter Acting, Pursued by Applause”, New York Times:
      In Japan traditional kabuki theater is known for kakegoe: shouting at actors upon their entrance, and throughout the performance.
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  32. kimbop
    • 2007 July 1, Liesl Schillinger, “Korean War”, New York Times:
      “When I was your age, I sold kimbop on the streets,” Joseph Han blusters, enraged by her sense of entitlement.
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  33. labbs
    • 2007 July 1, “Far East of the U.N.”, New York Times:
      Salads, particularly labbs and the unripe papaya salad called som tum, are a specialty of the area, and the spicy salad section of the Zabb Queens menu is the largest one.
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  34. leashlessly
    • 2007 July 1, J. David Goodman, “Two Wheels, Four Legs, Bared Teeth”, New York Times:
      IT was 7:30 one recent Saturday morning, and Ginkgo, a luminously well-groomed German short-haired pointer, was trotting along leashlessly in the recreation lane of the East Drive in Central Park.
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  35. louty
    • 2007 July 1, Richard B. Woodward, “Armchair Traveler”, New York Times:
      The country’s “self-serving and bogus view of history,” which pities the rest of the world for its disorder, hides what he sees as “the lumpen and louty, coarse, unsubtle, beady-eyed, beefy-bummed herd of England .”
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  36. mastman
    • 2007 July 1, Christopher Clarey, “Alinghi Within One Victory of America’s Cup”, New York Times:
      “I just said to the boys that when Australia won in Newport, they were 3-1 down, and we all know what happened there,” said Matt Mason, Team New Zealand’s mastman.
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  37. memosphere
    • 2007 July 1, Richard Dawkins, “Inferior Design”, New York Times:
      Behe’s name, and not theirs, crackled triumphantly around the memosphere.
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  38. midlist
    • 2007 July 1, Martha Southgate, “Writers Like Me”, New York Times:
      Calvin Reid, a senior news editor at Publishers Weekly, who often covers African-American publishing, agrees that black writers stuck in the midlist face an uphill battle, but he sees it as a business reality, not a racial thing: “If you have two or three books out and you’ve never sold more than 3,000 copies, people make decisions based on that.”
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  39. momos
    • 2007 July 1, “Far East of the U.N.”, New York Times:
      Many dishes show a direct influence of China or India; for example, momos, or Tibetan dumplings, look like Chinese pot-stickers.
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  40. museumgoing
    • 2007 July 1, Holland Cotter, “This Art Is Your Art, This Art Is My Art”, New York Times:
      “Our goal,” he declared, “is nothing less” than to “set the standard of museumgoing excellence for the world.”
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  41. nestings
    • 2007 July 1, Francis X. Clines, “Predatory Newcomers Flit About”, New York Times:
      The Web wends through other nestings and fledglings right back to the triplets’ neighborhood and the discovery that, well, of course, anyone paying attention knows red-tails have been living for years on the West Side.
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  42. noncelebrity
    • 2007 July 1, Francis X. Clines, “Predatory Newcomers Flit About”, New York Times:
      Jeff Kollbrunner offers rich pictures and jottings on the noncelebrity birds sweetly called Mama and Papa.
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  43. nonmarital
    • 2007 July 1, Sam Roberts, “The Shelf Life of Bliss”, New York Times:
      The United States is far from embracing Europe’s postmarriage model or its much higher rates of nonmarital births.
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  44. nontariff
    • 2007 July 1, Choe Sang-Hun, “Congressional Leaders Skeptical of South Korea Trade Deal”, New York Times:
      In Washington, lawmakers contended that the trade agreement failed to remove nontariff barriers that they said confined American automobile exports to South Korea to 5,000 cars last year while South Korea exported over 700,000 cars to the United States.
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  45. nonunanimous
    • 2007 July 1, Linda Greenhouse, “In Steps Big and Small, Supreme Court Moved Right”, New York Times:
      Their differences in style, while apparent, did not extend to difference in substance; in nonunanimous cases, the two were in agreement 89 percent of the time, according to statistics compiled by ScotusBlog.
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  46. observationalists
    • 2007 July 1, Lisa Margonelli, “Wild Is the Wind”, New York Times:
      And so the stage was set for the current dispute, again pitting observationalists against theorists on the subject of global warming’s influence on the storms.
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  47. outleaped
    • 2007 July 1, The Associated Press, “Crew Shuts Down Ángel and the Red Bulls”, New York Times:
      Kamara outleaped a Red Bulls defender to head in a crossing pass from the second-half substitute Andy Herron in the 69th minute.
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  48. outpitched
  49. overreachers
    • 2007 July 1, Jonathan Kalb, “The Thirty Years’ War, All 10 Hours of It”, New York Times:
      This sort of postindustrial wonderland, a breathtaking spectacle of mortality superimposed on hubristic accomplishment, is the location of choice for the theatrical overreachers of our age.
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  50. overrulings
    • 2007 July 1, Linda Greenhouse, “In Steps Big and Small, Supreme Court Moved Right”, New York Times:
      Other precedents were left standing, at least for the time being, by decisions that avoided direct overrulings while providing a roadmap for future challenges.
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  51. overwhip
    • 2007 July 1, Daniel Patterson, “Curd Mentality”, New York Times:
      Turn the mixer on medium-high, and then do that thing professional cooks live in fear of being yelled at for: overwhip the cream!
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  52. petrostate
    • 2007 July 1, Andrew Meier, “A Death in Moscow”, New York Times:
      In this final work, she gives us a near-stenographic record of her country’s descent: the emergence of a petrostate fueled by rising oil prices, as well as a willingness to sacrifice civil liberties along with, when necessary, its own citizens.
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  53. photogravures
    • 2007 July 1, Richard B. Woodward, “Double Exposure”, New York Times:
      For his heroic pains he died broke and obscure, while his sepia-tinted photogravures have become decorating clichés in luxury ski resorts throughout the West.
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  54. postadolescent
    • 2007 July 1, David Holmberg, “Student Evaluations”, New York Times:
      Just as television executives cannot assume that people are watching their channels and approving of what they put on the air, the powers-that-be in higher education cannot afford to be less than responsive to the reactions of their fussy postadolescent clientele.
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  55. postmarriage
    • 2007 July 1, Sam Roberts, “The Shelf Life of Bliss”, New York Times:
      The United States is far from embracing Europe’s postmarriage model or its much higher rates of nonmarital births.
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  56. poundcake
    • 2007 July 1, Monica Corcoran, “Jordan Roter and Guy Stodel”, New York Times:
      Mr. Stodel, a native of Johannesburg with a reputation for being as earnest and unaffected as a slice of poundcake, responded, “I don’t really have a lot of friends.”
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  57. reclad
    • 2007 July 1, Pilar Viladas, “Meta-Morphosis”, New York Times:
      They reclad the building with its intended materials — zinc-coated stainless steel and concrete board — rather than the low-budget materials (galvanized sheet metal and asphalt shingles) that had been used when it was built.
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  58. releasee
    • 2007 July 1, Carol Muske-Dukes, “The Prisoners Time Forgot”, New York Times:
      An article last fall in The Lone Star Iconoclast, a weekly newspaper in Crawford, Tex., by Diana Claitor, a co-founder of the Texas Jail Project, quotes a recent releasee from a women’s prison there: “The women in this jail are predominantly African-American or Hispanic and young and very poor.
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  59. retrievability
    • 2007 July 1, Jonathan Dee, “All the News That’s Fit to Print Out”, New York Times:
      For centuries, an encyclopedia was synonymous with a fixed, archival idea about the retrievability of information from the past.
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  60. romanticization
    • 2007 July 1, “Making History”, New York Times:
      Kirn is annoyed at my refusal to go along with the orthodox romanticization of Lincoln.
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  61. sazerac
    • 2007 July 1, Jonathan Miles, “Taste of Colonialism”, New York Times:
      And, most intriguingly, the Sazarak — a Middle Eastern riff on the sazerac, the canonical New Orleans cocktail — features rye whiskey and a cumin-and-caraway-flavored liqueur leavened with a trace of Lebanese arak.
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  62. semisecret
    • 2007 July 1, Christopher Clarey, “Alinghi Within One Victory of America’s Cup”, New York Times:
      But the Australians, with their winged keel, had a semisecret weapon in 1983 when they won three in a row to take the Cup, 4-3, from the New York Yacht Club.
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  63. servicepeople
    • 2007 July 1, Kevin Patterson, “Market Forces”, New York Times:
      With walnut-colored skin and rigid postures, they are utterly immiscible with the servicepeople around them.
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  64. sideyard
    • 2007 July 1, “Letters to the Editor”, New York Times:
      Yes, it is a hard-hat area, and you would not want to let children play in the back or sideyard.
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  65. skelly
    • 2007 July 1, Timothy Williams, “Anyone Up for Stickball? In a PlayStation World, Maybe Not”, New York Times:
      The drawing is a skelly board, for a game once so popular on the streets of New York that on some blocks adults had to walk in the street to avoid interrupting any of several games under way.
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  66. skelsies
    • 2007 July 1, Cassi Feldman, “The Rules of the Games, More or Less”, New York Times:
      ¶Skelly (a k a skully, skilsies, skelsies): Using a board drawn on the sidewalk, players flick bottle caps into 13 boxes in order — and then reverse order — skipping ahead if they hit other caps.
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  67. skilsies
    • 2007 July 1, Cassi Feldman, “The Rules of the Games, More or Less”, New York Times:
      ¶Skelly (a k a skully, skilsies, skelsies): Using a board drawn on the sidewalk, players flick bottle caps into 13 boxes in order — and then reverse order — skipping ahead if they hit other caps.
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  68. skully
    • 2007 July 1, Cassi Feldman, “The Rules of the Games, More or Less”, New York Times:
      ¶Skelly (a k a skully, skilsies, skelsies): Using a board drawn on the sidewalk, players flick bottle caps into 13 boxes in order — and then reverse order — skipping ahead if they hit other caps.
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  69. slowball
    • 2007 July 1, Jim Rutenberg, “Bush to Urge Putin to Aid in Pressuring Iran”, New York Times:
      “We imagine that the Russians and the Chinese are going to play slowball here,” said a senior official involved in the sanctions talks.
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  70. stagings
    • 2007 July 1, Jonathan Kalb, “The Thirty Years’ War, All 10 Hours of It”, New York Times:
      The full dramatic power of this “misunderstood” national treasure, he told the weekly magazine Der Spiegel, was obscured by centuries of vastly shortened stagings that reduced it to “a hollow-sounding historical drama.”
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  71. theaterati
    • 2007 July 1, Jonathan Kalb, “The Thirty Years’ War, All 10 Hours of It”, New York Times:
      “Wallenstein” — the story of a Hamlet-like general in the Thirty Years’ War who assembles an army formidable enough to challenge the power of the king he serves, but who then hesitates to act — is being performed in an abandoned beer warehouse in the gritty working-class district of Neukölln, not a common destination for the city’s theaterati.
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  72. trackings
    • 2007 July 1, Francis X. Clines, “Predatory Newcomers Flit About”, New York Times:
      This is a big deal on the West Side of Manhattan, where some casual bird-watchers have grown tired of the daily trackings and endless hosannas for Pale Male, the red-tailed hawk getting all the ink across town.
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  73. ultrapredictable
    • 2007 July 1, Norm Alster, “Your Debt May Become My Advantage”, New York Times:
      In putting together ever bigger deals with ever more burdensome debt, private equity buyers look for targets with ultrapredictable cash flow.
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  74. undescended
    • 2007 July 1, The Associated Press, “Funny Cide Still Going Strong at Age 7”, New York Times:
      Four years later, Funny Cide, who was neutered because he was born with an undescended testicle that made him uncomfortable when he ran, has lost a stride or two from his heyday.
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  75. unforgiven
    • 2007 July 1, Elizabeth Gilbert, “The Home Place”, New York Times:
      Rural, Methodist Iowans during the Great Depression were not a soft lot; when folks got unforgiven back then, they stayed unforgiven.
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  76. unfun
    • 2007 July 1, Mark Sarvas, “Beauty and the Geek”, New York Times:
      (“Denis stood at attention, like a waiter in an unfun restaurant”).
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  77. ungifted
    • 2007 July 1, Daphne Merkin, “The Nonconformist”, New York Times:
      This campaign — more an assault than a campaign — to push, prod and expensively tutor one’s teenager into the most auspicious, cocktail-party-ready of colleges has crescendoed in the last few years, fueled by the growing belief on the part of upper-middle-class parents that there are no ungifted offspring in their gilded ranks.
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  78. unleveraged
    • 2007 July 1, Norm Alster, “Your Debt May Become My Advantage”, New York Times:
      In running these mostly smaller casinos, which have traditionally appealed to area residents, a major rival is the relatively unleveraged Boyd Gaming .
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  79. unlucrative
    • 2007 July 1, Celia Barbour, “Stephen Spinella’s Real Estate Angels”, New York Times:
      After moving to New York in 1979, he survived many long, unlucrative years, financed by restaurant jobs, while he acted in regional theater and Off Off Off Broadway.
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  80. unmassaged
    • 2007 July 1, Liesl Schillinger, “Korean War”, New York Times:
      This “appreciation of the usual” and unmassaged portrayal of present realities also emerge in Lee’s ambitious book.
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Sequestered[edit]

  1. ringolario
    • 2007 July 1, Cassi Feldman, “The Rules of the Games, More or Less”, New York Times:
      ¶Ring-a-levio (a k a ringolario, ringoleario): Two teams face off, with one pursuing the other and trying to drag its players to “jail.”
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  2. ringoleario
    • 2007 July 1, Cassi Feldman, “The Rules of the Games, More or Less”, New York Times:
      ¶Ring-a-levio (a k a ringolario, ringoleario): Two teams face off, with one pursuing the other and trying to drag its players to “jail.”
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  3. unlemminglike
    • 2007 July 1, Daphne Merkin, “The Nonconformist”, New York Times:
      Far safer to bet that she’d get with the program in her own laggardly time and unlemminglike way.
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