User:Visviva/NYT 20070726

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This is a list of lowercase non-hyphenated single words found in the 2007-07-26 issue of the New York Times which did not have English entries in the English Wiktionary when this list was created (2009-02-11).

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101296 tokens ‧ 74838 valid lowercase tokens ‧ 8904 types ‧ 38 (~ 0.427%) words before cleaning ‧ 

2007-07-26[edit]

  1. antireformist
    • 2007 July 26, Norimitsu Onishi, “Japan’s Leader Attacked by His Own Party”, New York Times:
      Mr. Abe had described himself as the heir to political and economic reforms undertaken by his predecessor, Junichiro Koizumi , but he quickly readmitted antireformist lawmakers whom Mr. Koizumi had expelled from the party.
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  2. bangless
    • 2007 July 26, Anna Jane Grossman, “Bangs Return, and With Them, Naysayers and Chopaholics”, New York Times:
      Whether they conjure painful visions of husband-stealers or happy memories of Betty and Veronica, bangs are an appealing option in the summer, when the weather forces the bangless to march around with hair greased back with sweat, like so many W.N.B.A. players or Romanian gymnasts.
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  3. campuswide
  4. cineastes
  5. covetable
  6. diphonic
  7. dishdashas
  8. homerless
  9. impatiens
    • 2007 July 26, Anne Raver, “Recognizing Those Who Keep Brooklyn in Bloom”, New York Times:
      I usually hate impatiens, planted like a petticoat at the bottom of a dignified tree, and I think of rose of Sharon as a weed and rip it out whenever I see it sprouting in my garden.
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  10. linebacking
  11. multilayering
    • 2007 July 26, Alastair Macaulay, “From Mongolia, Layered Voices and Intimations of the Eternal”, New York Times:
      Often it seems (as recently occurred to me with the wonderful Noche Flamenca performance at Theater 80, and as strikes anyone who listens to some opera) that the music is suggesting something quite unlike its words; and this multilayering only enriches the experience.
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  12. nonintuitively
    • 2007 July 26, David Pogue, “Here Is Your Pen Scanner, Mr. Bond”, New York Times:
      Then, after importing the scans from the pen — by clicking, nonintuitively, a button called Scan, and then another called Download — they’re still not really in PaperPort; you have to select their icons and then hit Transfer.
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  13. nonserialized
    • 2007 July 26, Anna Jane Grossman, “Is Junie B. Jones Talking Trash?”, New York Times:
      “I’ve never been in such good company!” said Ms. Park, 60, who before creating the impish heroine wrote nonserialized books for slightly older children.
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  14. nontheists
    • 2007 July 26, “The Belief Factor (1 Letter)”, New York Times:
      Your coverage of the prejudice against nontheists in the voting booth did not examine the misinformation that leads to this discrimination.
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  15. nonwaiver
    • 2007 July 26, Ben Shpigel, “Drama and Milledge Go Hand in Hand”, New York Times:
      DECISION TIME APPROACHING There is less than a week until Tuesday’s nonwaiver trade deadline, which should be enough time for the Mets to evaluate whether they will forge ahead with Rubén Gotay and Damion Easley at second base or pursue a defensive upgrade.
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  16. oversaturated
  17. picniclike
    • 2007 July 26, Ruth La Ferla, “Accessorize With Grass Stain”, New York Times:
      Lia Fiorini (left) dressed in the picniclike spirit of the night, wearing gingham and elevated Mary Janes.
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  18. precomputed
    • 2007 July 26, John Markoff, “In Poker Match Against a Machine, Humans Are Better Bluffers”, New York Times:
      Unlike computer chess programs, which require immense amounts of computing power to determine every possible future move, the Polaris poker software is largely precomputed, running for weeks before the match to build a series of agents called “bots” that have differing personalities or styles of play, ranging from aggressive to passive.
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  19. ratbagging
  20. slingbacks
    • 2007 July 26, Mike Albo, “You’ve Come a Long Way, Baby”, New York Times:
      She roamed around the diaper bags with the same focus she had probably given to a pair of Jimmy Choo slingbacks 10 years earlier.
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  21. spylike
    • 2007 July 26, David Pogue, “Here Is Your Pen Scanner, Mr. Bond”, New York Times:
      Those were all fictional, but that’s not to say that supertiny spylike gadgetry doesn’t exist.
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  22. stressfree
  23. supertiny
    • 2007 July 26, David Pogue, “Here Is Your Pen Scanner, Mr. Bond”, New York Times:
      Those were all fictional, but that’s not to say that supertiny spylike gadgetry doesn’t exist.
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  24. swoe
  25. tapestrylike
    • 2007 July 26, Eric Wilson, “Smith Street Confronts the Corporate Takeover”, New York Times:
      A clique of neighborhood teenagers mill about the store, at 151 Smith Street, from the early afternoon until late in the evening, scanning a tapestrylike display of symmetrical skateboards with cartoons of stags bearing the legs of an octopus and tie-dye prints, and some wider styles for older customers.
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  26. trackable
    • 2007 July 26, Bloomberg News, “Report Faults NASA on Equipment Losses”, New York Times:
      Instead of tightening controls, it relaxed them, making $10,000 the minimum value for trackable items, instead of $5,000, the report said.
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  27. triphonic
    • 2007 July 26, Alastair Macaulay, “From Mongolia, Layered Voices and Intimations of the Eternal”, New York Times:
      At the risk of diminishing its impact, this recalls the Disney cartoon “The Whale Who Wanted to Sing at the Met” (one of the episodes in the 1946 film “Make Mine Music”), in which the lead character, Willie the whale, sung by Nelson Eddy (never better), is joyously triphonic, and can sing tenor, baritone and bass simultaneously in the “Rigoletto” quartet.
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  28. troublemaking
    • 2007 July 26, Anna Jane Grossman, “Is Junie B. Jones Talking Trash?”, New York Times:
      The spunky kindergartener (first grader in more recent volumes) is prone to troublemaking, often calls people names and isn’t averse to talking back to her teachers.
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  29. unbanged
    • 2007 July 26, Anna Jane Grossman, “Bangs Return, and With Them, Naysayers and Chopaholics”, New York Times:
      “To me, they scream: ‘I’m cooler than you, I have a lot of sex, and if you leave your husband with me I’ll devour him,’ ” said Meredith Hays, a literary agent in Manhattan with an unbanged brow.
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  30. unsettlingly
    • 2007 July 26, Jeremy W. Peters, “His First Film Is a Winner (Being a Millionaire Helps)”, New York Times:
      Granted, he bounced around some of the nation’s pre-eminent political think tanks and universities, like the Brookings Institution and M.I.T. But he said he found something unsettlingly directionless about the experience, even as he wrote the third book.
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  31. washings

Sequestered[edit]

  1. mitzvahed
    • 2007 July 26, Ginia Bellafante, “Ah, the 30s: Not Fun After All”, New York Times:
      “I Hate My 30s” is about emerging adults, but it can feel as if it were written by people not yet old enough to be bar mitzvahed.
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