User:Visviva/NYT 20070729

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This is a list of lowercase non-hyphenated single words found in the 2007-07-29 issue of the New York Times which did not have English entries in the English Wiktionary when this list was created (2009-02-11).

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167847 tokens ‧ 124037 valid lowercase tokens ‧ 12654 types ‧ 86 (~ 0.68%) words before cleaning ‧ 

2007-07-29[edit]

  1. angus
    • 2007 July 29, Saki Knafo, “Decline of the Dog”, New York Times:
      The son of a hot-dog vendor, Mr. Dragonas has succeeded by continually reinventing himself, supplementing staples like souvlaki and Italian sausages with black angus steak and prosciutto-and-mozzarella sandwiches.
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  2. antiempirical
    • 2007 July 29, Mary Jo Murphy, “Sex, Love and the Scolding Psychotherapist”, New York Times:
      In regard to life in general ... and to capitalism in particular, objectivism is just about as unrealistic and antiempirical as it can be.
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  3. ballmaker
    • 2007 July 29, Karen Crouse, “A New Day at St. Andrews Golf Course”, New York Times:
      The Old Course, the most famous of six public layouts at St. Andrews, is where the first known professional golfer, the ballmaker Allan Robertson, carded the first score below 80, in 1858.
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  4. beachcombing
    • 2007 July 29, Bruce Barcott, “In the Shadow of Moby-Dick”, New York Times:
      Early colonists practiced drift whaling — essentially, beachcombing for carcasses.
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  5. buyable
    • 2007 July 29, Rob Walker, “Boxed Set”, New York Times:
      The crass use of the word “unit” to describe a buyable collection of music makes a certain sense in this case.
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  6. campuswide
    • 2007 July 29, Bruce Weber, “The Residential Collage”, New York Times:
      The Freshman Commons at Vanderbilt, in Nashville, is to open in fall 2008 as the first stage of a campuswide conversion to a residential college system.
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  7. chicklike
    • 2007 July 29, Michael S. Schmidt, “With Patrick Kane”, New York Times:
      I like chicklike stuff.
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  8. communiques *
    • 2007 July 29, Alex Williams, “(-: Just Between You and Me ;-)”, New York Times:
      Christopher P. Michel, the founder and chairman of Military.com , a military and veteran affairs Web site, said that usage of emoticons has grown “hyper-pervasive” in his communiques even with admirals at the Pentagon, where they provide a certain cover for high-ranking leaders to comment on sensitive matters.
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  9. continuingly
  10. conversance
    • 2007 July 29, David Colman, “Beauty for a Closet’s Sake”, New York Times:
      So Ms. Oates confessed a certain conversance with many of the expected topics.
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  11. curbless
    • 2007 July 29, Gregory Beyer, “Where Street, Sidewalk and Sanity Intersect”, New York Times:
      He and his staff looked worldwide — to Trafalgar Square in London, to the Spanish Steps in Rome — and found that the designs best suited to the intersections were the Netherlands’ curbless woonerfs, which make no differentiation between street and sidewalk.
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  12. cyberhipness
  13. datebook
    • 2007 July 29, Mireya Navarro, “Love Him or (He Prefers) Hate Him”, New York Times:
      Take a recent week from his July datebook: On a Friday morning, he was sparring with Joy Behar and Elisabeth Hasselbeck on “The View” about the not-so-nice dish on his celebrity gossip blog, Perezhilton.com .
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  14. dispensationalists
    • 2007 July 29, Laurie Goodstein, “Coalition of Evangelicals Voices Support for Palestinian State”, New York Times:
      Mr. Hagee and others are dispensationalists, Mr. Weber said, who interpret the Bible as predicting that in order for Christ to return, the Jews must gather in Israel, the third temple must be built in Jerusalem and the Battle of Armageddon must be fought.
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  15. dormmates
  16. espie
    • 2007 July 29, Bruce Barcott, “In the Shadow of Moby-Dick”, New York Times:
      In others, town fathers appointed spotters “to view & espie if there be any whales cast up” after storms, with the spoils divided among all citizens.
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  17. faddishness
    • 2007 July 29, Alex Williams, “(-: Just Between You and Me ;-)”, New York Times:
      Emoticons, the smiling, winking and frowning faces that inhabit the computer keyboard, have not only hung around long past their youth faddishness of the 1990s, but they have grown up.
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  18. farrotto
    • 2007 July 29, “Village Cuisine”, New York Times:
      Anne Burrell, who worked in a number of restaurants in New York and Italy, is serving tapas-like tidbits she calls piccolini, as well as substantial plates of inventive Italian fare like oxtail cakes with parmesan frico, farrotto with lobster and peas, and pork chop crusted with fennel pollen.
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  19. gumminess
  20. interdimensional
    • 2007 July 29, Dave Itzkoff, “My Evil Plan”, New York Times:
      Grossman has taken such care to portray them as aloof and unrelatable — as people whose abilities and adventures among interdimensional creatures and outer-space aliens have rendered them indifferent to the concerns of mere mortals — that his plans succeed too well: we come to dread the chapters that focus on the Champions and wish we were reading more about Doctor Impossible.
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  21. ladleful
  22. loonily
    • 2007 July 29, Vincent Cosgrove, “When KAOS Threatens, Talk to the Shoe”, New York Times:
      No matter how ridiculous the plot — and every episode is ridiculous — the writers loonily tie together the story in the end.
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  23. lullingly
    • 2007 July 29, Lawrence Downes, “The Pope Reopens a Portal to Eternity, via the 1950s”, New York Times:
      It becomes as lullingly familiar as a weekly drive to a relative’s house: opening prayers like quick turns though local streets, long freeway stretches of readings, homily and Eucharistic prayers, the quietude of communion and then — thanks be to God — the final blessing, a song and home to pancakes and the Sunday comics.
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  24. mafiosi *
    • 2007 July 29, Mirta Ojito, “The Scorsese of Salseros in New York”, New York Times:
      “Just as Scorsese and Sidney Lumet have given us a New York of corrupt cops and colorful mafiosi, Leon has given us, with his stories of popular singers, a New York of heartbreaks and shattered dreams,” said Jorge Ulla, a filmmaker.
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  25. mearchant
    • 2007 July 29, Bruce Barcott, “In the Shadow of Moby-Dick”, New York Times:
      As William Morrell, an Episcopal clergyman who arrived in Plymouth in 1623, wrote: “The mighty whale doth in these harbours lye, / Whose oyle the careful mearchant deare will buy.”
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  26. megaproducer
    • 2007 July 29, Celia Mcgee, “Rendezvous at Rydell High, Off 42nd Street”, New York Times:
      Combing completely different neighborhoods, they ended up in the same barely finished high-rise building, encouraged by the real-estate agent recommended by the production office on “Grease,” a partnership of the British megaproducer David Ian, the Nederlander Organization and Phoenix Productions, with NBC Universal as ever in the wings.
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  27. midgrade
    • 2007 July 29, Norman Mayersohn, “A Lesson in European Economy”, New York Times:
      At the time I drove it, diesel fuel was selling for $2.99 a gallon in New Jersey, about a nickel less than midgrade gas and 30 cents cheaper than premium.
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  28. nitpickiness
    • 2007 July 29, David Orr, “Translating Zbigniew Herbert”, New York Times:
      Putting aside the nitpickiness of the complaint — “plenitude” originates in Latin, “fullness” doesn’t — “plenitude” also has philosophical associations running from Aristotle to St. Thomas Aquinas to David Lewis.
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  29. nonartistic
    • 2007 July 29, Charles Mcgrath, “Twilight of the Sun King”, New York Times:
      “I wouldn’t want the job either, because frankly I wouldn’t want to spend so much of my time on nonartistic matters.”
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  30. nondogmatic
    • 2007 July 29, Mark Hulbert, “In All Things Moderation, Including Market Timing”, New York Times:
      Over the 33 years beginning in 1972 and ending in 2004, the portfolio of the nondogmatic skeptic outperformed those at either extreme in the asset allocation debate.
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  31. nonglamorous
    • 2007 July 29, Mireya Navarro, “Love Him or (He Prefers) Hate Him”, New York Times:
      One day he was a struggling actor, paying bills with nonglamorous day jobs (publications manager for a gay organization; publicist for trade shows; a reporter for Star magazine, which fired him).
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  32. nonhardening
    • 2007 July 29, Richard Sandomir, “Sculptor Creates the Lasting Images of Hall Inductees”, New York Times:
      Ellis molds each Hall of Famer’s likeness with nonhardening clay, heating it, breaking it into smaller pieces, until the blob starts to resemble the inductee, who usually is famous to millions.
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  33. nonmainstream
    • 2007 July 29, Rob Walker, “Boxed Set”, New York Times:
      Word of the Buddha Machine traveled quickly among adventurous music consumers, says Eric Benoit, the publicist for Forced Exposure, a distributor specializing in a wide range of nonmainstream music, which peddles the device through its own site and sells it wholesale to progressive music retailers.
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  34. nonmarital
    • 2007 July 29, Celia Barbour, “A Loft Built on Vision and Sweat”, New York Times:
      NINE years ago, Eric Freitag made a vow of a nonmarital sort to his new wife, Jil Weinstock.
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  35. nonwaiver
  36. orata *
    • 2007 July 29, “Village Cuisine”, New York Times:
      The current menu includes oven roasted whole orata, and baby back lamb ribs Provencal.
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  37. overgeneralizer
  38. paccheri
  39. pappified
    • 2007 July 29, Joe Rhodes, “It’s Not About the Copious Fake Sex. Really.”, New York Times:
      Hank’s one and only successful novel, “God Hates Us All,” has been pappified into a sappy and successful movie renamed “Crazy Little Thing Called Love” and starring “Tom and Katie,” no last names necessary.
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  40. parklike
    • 2007 July 29, Penelope Green, “This New House”, New York Times:
      In 1932, The New York Times Magazine published an article by Le Corbusier proposing the ideal city of the future: a vision of skyscrapers planted like trees in parklike settings.
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  41. pewmates
  42. piccolini *
    • 2007 July 29, “Village Cuisine”, New York Times:
      Anne Burrell, who worked in a number of restaurants in New York and Italy, is serving tapas-like tidbits she calls piccolini, as well as substantial plates of inventive Italian fare like oxtail cakes with parmesan frico, farrotto with lobster and peas, and pork chop crusted with fennel pollen.
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  43. ponytailed
  44. realityish
    • 2007 July 29, Mickey Rapkin, “Double Shot of Reality”, New York Times:
      Now, inevitably, after stints in rehab (Mr. Feldman for heroin, Mr. Haim for cocaine), unfortunate career moves, and several broken engagements, they reunite for “The Two Coreys,” a realityish series premiering tonight on A&E.
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  45. salsero
    • 2007 July 29, Mirta Ojito, “The Scorsese of Salseros in New York”, New York Times:
      It is that euphoric feeling of being liberated by art and raw talent while struggling to remain true to one’s roots that Mr. Ichaso set out to capture in films like the highly acclaimed “Crossover Dreams” and “Piñero,” and “El Cantante,” based on the life of Héctor Lavoe, a popular Puerto Rican salsero who died of AIDS at 46 in 1993.
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  46. saltboxes
  47. satirizer
  48. scapulars
  49. screamfest
  50. shoreside
    • 2007 July 29, Haim Watzman, “Israel’s Incredible Shrinking Sea”, New York Times:
      What were once shoreside amenities now stand forlornly in the middle of the desert, a 300-yard hike from the beach.
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  51. socioeconomically
    • 2007 July 29, “When Great Art Meets Great Evil”, New York Times:
      And I got experience playing for people from all different strata socioeconomically, a lot of different ethnic backgrounds.
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  52. speargun
    • 2007 July 29, Brendan I. Koerner, “A Trimmer Gun to Spear Smaller Fry”, New York Times:
      “We basically go for the big fish, the big sea bass down in Mexico,” said Jay Riffe, president of the speargun manufacturer Riffe International, based in San Clemente, Calif.
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  53. spearguns
    • 2007 July 29, Brendan I. Koerner, “A Trimmer Gun to Spear Smaller Fry”, New York Times:
      The five Euro Series spearguns, whose stocks range in length from 102 to 145 centimeters (about 40 to 57 inches), went on sale in January 2006, priced from $380 to $474.
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  54. sporked
    • 2007 July 29, Erin Mckean, “Corpus”, New York Times:
      (In fact, some of the most common things to be sporked, far ahead of coleslaw, are eyeballs.)
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  55. sporking
    • 2007 July 29, Erin Mckean, “Corpus”, New York Times:
      Now, obviously, most of this sporking is facetious, done purely for humorous intent (none of the eyeballs being sporked were in news reports), but the phenomenon of the weaponized spork is one that passed lexicographers and language researchers by until we saw the corpus evidence.
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  56. tourelles
    • 2007 July 29, Christopher Gray, “The Face Will Still Be Forbidding, but Much Tighter and Cleaner”, New York Times:
      Mr. Cady made no little plans and conceived a massive complex similar to the first part, but in movie-style Romanesque, with great sweeps of pink granite dotted with turrets, tourelles and other castlelike features.
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  57. trackside
    • 2007 July 29, Dave Caldwell, “Victory at Brickyard Would Lift Earnhardt”, New York Times:
      Chris Williams, the director of trackside operations at Motorsports Authentics, said sales of Earnhardt merchandise nearly doubled during a race two weeks ago in Joliet, Ill., the first weekend of the half-price sale.
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  58. ubiquitousness
    • 2007 July 29, Mary Jo Murphy, “Sex, Love and the Scolding Psychotherapist”, New York Times:
      From the age of 16 onward (in 1929), I read many books by Freud and his followers, but I could see that Sigmund was especially obsessed with the sexual “origins” of disturbance, especially with the ubiquitousness of the Oedipus complex.
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  59. unrelatable
    • 2007 July 29, Dave Itzkoff, “My Evil Plan”, New York Times:
      Grossman has taken such care to portray them as aloof and unrelatable — as people whose abilities and adventures among interdimensional creatures and outer-space aliens have rendered them indifferent to the concerns of mere mortals — that his plans succeed too well: we come to dread the chapters that focus on the Champions and wish we were reading more about Doctor Impossible.
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  60. unscreened
    • 2007 July 29, Elisabeth Rosenthal, “Quiet. Libya Has an AIDS Problem.”, New York Times:
      In many of those nations more than 10 percent of the adult population is infected. Mr. Colizzi concluded that the virus had been spread by the infusion of unscreened blood and blood products, as well as by unsterilized equipment, pervasive problems that have only been partly solved.
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  61. unsterilized
    • 2007 July 29, Elisabeth Rosenthal, “Quiet. Libya Has an AIDS Problem.”, New York Times:
      In many of those nations more than 10 percent of the adult population is infected. Mr. Colizzi concluded that the virus had been spread by the infusion of unscreened blood and blood products, as well as by unsterilized equipment, pervasive problems that have only been partly solved.
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  62. upsetness
    • 2007 July 29, Mary Jo Murphy, “Sex, Love and the Scolding Psychotherapist”, New York Times:
      These Irrational Beliefs will keep your original upsetness vividly alive — instead of letting it die a natural death, as disturbance gradually does if you don’t dwell on it and reinforce it by continual crooked thinking.
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  63. whalemen
    • 2007 July 29, Bruce Barcott, “In the Shadow of Moby-Dick”, New York Times:
      Given our modern affection for whales, you might wonder if the whalemen felt any pangs of conscience.
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  64. whininess
    • 2007 July 29, Robin Marantz Henig, “The Real Transformers”, New York Times:
      At the Humanoid Robotics Group at M.I.T., a robot’s “humanoid” qualities can include fallibility and whininess as much as physical traits like head, arms and torso.
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  65. wildman
    • 2007 July 29, Charles Mcgrath, “Twilight of the Sun King”, New York Times:
      He was not a wildman, but a bespectacled, nicely tailored aesthete.
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  66. winglet
    • 2007 July 29, Michelle Higgins, “The Flights Are Long. The Planes Are Cramped.”, New York Times:
      The new winglet technology, further expanding the 757’s range, allows United States carriers in search of new markets overseas to expand service to more regions, often with direct routes to smaller cities — moves they wouldn’t be able to justify using larger planes that eat up more fuel and have many more seats to fill.
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  67. winglets
    • 2007 July 29, Michelle Higgins, “The Flights Are Long. The Planes Are Cramped.”, New York Times:
      The use of 757s on trans-Atlantic flights was recently made possible by so-called blended winglets — new devices on wings that reduce drag, increase fuel efficiency and boost flight range.
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  68. winkled
    • 2007 July 29, Madison Smartt Bell, “My Dark Places”, New York Times:
      A part of Sebastian’s dark hidden knowledge (somewhat tediously winkled out — how many novels before this one have been organized around the slow excavation of repressed memory?) is that his mother committed suicide: “I know things that happened to Mother and what she saw.
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  69. woonerfs
    • 2007 July 29, Gregory Beyer, “Where Street, Sidewalk and Sanity Intersect”, New York Times:
      He and his staff looked worldwide — to Trafalgar Square in London, to the Spanish Steps in Rome — and found that the designs best suited to the intersections were the Netherlands’ curbless woonerfs, which make no differentiation between street and sidewalk.
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Sequestered[edit]