User:Visviva/NYT 20070805

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This is a list of lowercase non-hyphenated single words found in the 2007-08-05 issue of the New York Times which did not have English entries in the English Wiktionary when this list was created (2009-02-11).

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156134 tokens ‧ 115401 valid lowercase tokens ‧ 12511 types ‧ 81 (~ 0.647%) words before cleaning ‧ 

2007-08-05[edit]

  1. adviserhood
    • 2007 August 5, William Safire, “Strategist, Rising”, New York Times:
      At the bottom of Newsweek’s cruel hierarchal reportage is Steve Hildebrand, who “serves as an ‘early state’ adviser and strategist,” and whom I can hear saying, “If you’re going to limit my adviserhood to early states, at least call me a strategist too.”
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  2. allee
    • 2007 August 5, Tracie Rozhon, “Even a Master Needs Help Sometimes”, New York Times:
      About $800,000 for a complete interior and exterior remodeling and about $200,000 for landscaping, including an allee of mature trees
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  3. baku
    • 2007 August 5, Ligaya Mishan, “Lost Pets”, New York Times:
      These include not only the cryptozoological all-stars — basilisk, chimera, sphinx — but lesser-known creatures like the baku, which feeds on nightmares, and the mermecolion, part lion, part ant, “so fantastical that, by definition, it cannot survive.”
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  4. browsable
  5. bushcamp
    • 2007 August 5, Jennifer Conlin, “Your Fellow Guests May Be Really Wild”, New York Times:
      Another option is Londolozi, (the Zulu word for “protector of all living things”) a well-known South African bushcamp specializing in leopard conservation.
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  6. coatless
    • 2007 August 5, Nina Bernstein, “Safe From Persecution, Still Bearing Its Scars”, New York Times:
      But since the first family arrived here in March, coatless and stunned to find what appeared to be a cold desert of leafless trees, the city has become a beacon to other Gatumba survivors around the country.
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  7. comebacker
    • 2007 August 5, Ben Shpigel, “Maine Loses His Composure and the Mets Lose a Game in Chicago”, New York Times:
      But he could not handle what he viewed as lapses in concentration: after the close call at first, and during the previous at-bat, when Alfonso Soriano hit a comebacker that Maine did not field cleanly, costing him a chance for a double play.
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  8. computery
    • 2007 August 5, Charles Mcgrath, “Courting Fantasy Fans (and Everyone Else)”, New York Times:
      Set in two parallel worlds, a quaint Victorian village named Wall and the fantastical kingdom of Stormhold, and with a plot that involves both a witch and a posse of murderous princes chasing after a fallen meteorite that is really a young woman, “Stardust” is also written in a consciously old-fashioned manner. Mr. Gaiman composed it in longhand, using a fountain pen and a leather-covered notebook, he said in New York recently, and the result was that he eliminated “a lot of computery bloat.”
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  9. consiglieres
  10. cyberloser
    • 2007 August 5, Daniel Gross, “Thy Neighbor’s Stash”, New York Times:
      But when everybody else has broadband, that 56K makes you feel like a cyberloser.
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  11. dahabiehs
    • 2007 August 5, Lisa Fugard, “Against the Current”, New York Times:
      Much has changed since the Victorians traveled in large comfortable boats called dahabiehs — “a bit like floating down the Nile in a brownstone,” Mahoney says.
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  12. decertified
    • 2007 August 5, Christopher Drew, “California Restricts Voting Machines”, New York Times:
      California ’s top election official on Friday decertified three voting systems widely used in the state but said she would let counties use the machines in February’s presidential primary if extra security precautions were taken.
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  13. developable
    • 2007 August 5, Valerie Cotsalas, “Preserving Land, but Not for Farmers”, New York Times:
      But because land in eastern Long Island is so valuable — in some places, developable land sells for as much as $5 million per acre — even land that cannot be developed has increased in price.
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  14. distancingly
    • 2007 August 5, Liesl Schillinger, “The Boy Next Door”, New York Times:
      “Personal stuff” is “smoke,” Kate tells Jamie, trying to sound distancingly in control.
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  15. egotisms
    • 2007 August 5, Walter Kirn, “Vacation, All I Never Wanted”, New York Times:
      That fewer of us are doing so, it’s said, is a symptom of either anxious overcompetiveness (while I’m learning to fly-fish, that new guy down the hall is learning how to do my job); upward-mobility addiction (the cost of a 10-day Alaskan eco-trek is a down payment on a Lexus coupe!); the breakdown of the family (toasting s’mores for bored brats around a campfire is not a father’s duty anymore); or, perhaps, a complicated bitterness over the fact that surpassing France’s economy will never help us surpass its egotisms, so why bother aping the gourmet loafing that even most Frenchmen must sense has made them poorer?
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  16. exitless
    • 2007 August 5, Walter Kirn, “Vacation, All I Never Wanted”, New York Times:
      And don’t just behold, but gape upon and shiver at the colossal gaming-dining-bowling-Omnimaxing ultra-plexes whose honeycombed, multiplanar interiors evoke the vast convolutions of Utah canyons or the seemingly exitless great basilicas and which produce in me an awe that I felt coerced into experiencing during a boyhood trip to a billboard-hyped cavern in South Dakota, but didn’t experience and had to fake so my dad wouldn’t sulk and neglect to buy me ice cream.
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  17. feministas
    • 2007 August 5, Stephen Metcalf, “The Road to Rightville”, New York Times:
      Dinesh D’Souza arrived at Dartmouth a moderate-to-liberal kid from Mumbai, only to discover a faculty infiltrated by radical feministas, women who “made statements to the effect that all males were potential rapists.”
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  18. flipbooks
  19. hinterlanders
    • 2007 August 5, Jonathan Raban, “When Loggers Become Bloggers”, New York Times:
      The enduring suspicion of some rural hinterlanders is that the Northwest’s precious environment, of mountains, forest, ocean, is merely an urban weekend amenity, to be saved from the local yokels by crusading Seattleites who recoil from the prospect of actually living in it.
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  20. homerless
  21. libidinally
    • 2007 August 5, “Her Mother, Her Self”, New York Times:
      I think no woman is electable in America, and particularly not Hillary, because she is married to this guy whom everyone is libidinally attached to.
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  22. littleneck
    • 2007 August 5, Nicole Mones, “Double Happiness”, New York Times:
      2 pounds Manila or littleneck clams, scrubbed and dried
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  23. maneuverings
    • 2007 August 5, Sam Roberts, “Mayors on the Campaign Trail (and the Dentist in Distress)”, New York Times:
      Insights into far more recent political maneuverings involving a New York mayor can be found in “The Power of the Vote: Electing Presidents, Overthrowing Dictators, and Promoting Democracy Around the World” (Harper Paperbacks, $25.95).
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  24. megastores
    • 2007 August 5, Jennifer Vanderbes, “Surf the Web, Walk the Streets”, New York Times:
      New York — unlike Los Angeles, Cincinnati or almost every other town in America — is a pedestrian city, which means that the city-dweller daily wanders a labyrinth of skyscrapers and walk-ups, megastores and boutiques.
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  25. mermecolion
    • 2007 August 5, Ligaya Mishan, “Lost Pets”, New York Times:
      These include not only the cryptozoological all-stars — basilisk, chimera, sphinx — but lesser-known creatures like the baku, which feeds on nightmares, and the mermecolion, part lion, part ant, “so fantastical that, by definition, it cannot survive.”
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  26. midpriced
    • 2007 August 5, Lisa Chamberlain, “When Creating Brands, Dress Rehearsals Help”, New York Times:
      “It’s becoming harder to find sites,” Mr. Hanson said, “so we see many of these midpriced hotels as ways to have growth on smaller pieces of ground, because land is expensive.”
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  27. misimpressions
  28. multihomer
  29. multiplanar
    • 2007 August 5, Walter Kirn, “Vacation, All I Never Wanted”, New York Times:
      And don’t just behold, but gape upon and shiver at the colossal gaming-dining-bowling-Omnimaxing ultra-plexes whose honeycombed, multiplanar interiors evoke the vast convolutions of Utah canyons or the seemingly exitless great basilicas and which produce in me an awe that I felt coerced into experiencing during a boyhood trip to a billboard-hyped cavern in South Dakota, but didn’t experience and had to fake so my dad wouldn’t sulk and neglect to buy me ice cream.
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  30. multispecialty
    • 2007 August 5, “What Doctors Make, and Why (6 Letters)”, New York Times:
      The combination of fixed prepayments and multispecialty physician groups encouraged corridor consultation, collaboration and continual peer review; and provided incentives to deliver preventive and curative care in the most appropriate settings — in contrast to the incentives inherent in the prevailing procedure-driven, fee-for-service reimbursement system as you describe.
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  31. neopermanent
    • 2007 August 5, William Safire, “Strategist, Rising”, New York Times:
      No longer do today’s neopermanent campaigners have a campaign chairman for prestigious window dressing and a hard-bitten campaign manager directing both planning and execution.
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  32. nerdcore
    • 2007 August 5, Alex Williams, “Dungeons, Dragons and Dope Beats”, New York Times:
      Many nerdcore anthems — “You Got Asperger’s” by MC Frontalot, “Fett’s Vette” by MC Chris, “View Source,” by Ytcracker (“Eagerly awaiting my macro advances/running with my beta cuz I’m taking chances”) — are as much efforts at comedy as they are attempts at sincere hip-hop.
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  33. nonfantasy
  34. nonfarmers
    • 2007 August 5, Valerie Cotsalas, “Preserving Land, but Not for Farmers”, New York Times:
      And as more preserved farmland is bought up by wealthy nonfarmers, the situation gets worse because it raises the market value of all such land, said John v.
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  35. nonfossil
    • 2007 August 5, John M. Broder, “Energy Bill Adopted by House Requires Utilities to Use Renewable Power Sources”, New York Times:
      Sponsored by Representative Tom Udall, Democrat of New Mexico, and several others, it will force utilities to make a significant share of their electricity from solar, wind, geothermal, water and other nonfossil fuel sources, although they can meet part of the requirement through conservation measures.
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  36. nonsystem
    • 2007 August 5, “What Doctors Make, and Why (6 Letters)”, New York Times:
      Prepaid group practice, as the model was called, stood in stark contrast to the dominant fee-for-service, solo practice system (or nonsystem).
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  37. nostalgiacs
    • 2007 August 5, William Safire, “Strategist, Rising”, New York Times:
      In olden times (back in the day when nostalgiacs would say “time was”) your answer would be campaign manager.
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  38. organlike
  39. overclass
    • 2007 August 5, Daniel Gross, “Thy Neighbor’s Stash”, New York Times:
      The rise of an overclass, he convincingly argues, is indirectly affecting the quality of life of the rest of the population — and not in a good way.
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  40. overidealizes
  41. pamphleteering
    • 2007 August 5, Jennifer Vanderbes, “Surf the Web, Walk the Streets”, New York Times:
      Take the subway — a sort of hyperlink to your next address — but even then, pop-ups abound: gospel singers working the E train, Jews for Jesus pamphleteering on the F train, break-dancing children moon-walking their way across quiet cars of the D line.
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  42. peryton
    • 2007 August 5, Ligaya Mishan, “Lost Pets”, New York Times:
      (The peryton also makes an appearance, in a nod to its inventor, Borges — who compiled his own bestiary, “The Book of Imaginary Beings,” itself supposedly based on a long-lost medieval text.)
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  43. psychoanalyzed
  44. quattro *
    • 2007 August 5, Christopher Jensen, “First Came Style; Now, Substance”, New York Times:
      Those who want the V-6 must also take the quattro all-wheel drive system and a price of $42,275.
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  45. ranchland
  46. reapproving
    • 2007 August 5, Christopher Drew, “California Restricts Voting Machines”, New York Times:
      In a sense Ms. Bowen’s decision amounts to barring the machines, then reapproving their use under strict new conditions.
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  47. rebuttable
  48. reinfiltrate
  49. semiconsciously
    • 2007 August 5, Robert Sullivan, “Grass Roots Rising”, New York Times:
      But Hawken does imply that the movement — which he estimates at perhaps two million organizations strong — is a sign of life stirring in the beaten-up bowels of the planet, part of the earth’s own immunological response, as executed collectively (maybe even semiconsciously) by “social antibodies.”
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  50. showboater
    • 2007 August 5, David Colman, “Don’t Let the Sun Catch You Tanning”, New York Times:
      But as proof that she is not merely some phobic S.P.F. showboater in Gandhi clothing, Dr. Wexler explained that her favorite moment comes when she can finally escape her portable sun shields for an immobile one truly out of the sun.
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  51. societywide
    • 2007 August 5, Daniel Gross, “Thy Neighbor’s Stash”, New York Times:
      What does this societywide arms race for goods have to do with income inequality?
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  52. sociomedical
    • 2007 August 5, Cassi Feldman, “The Days and Nights of Maurice Cherry”, New York Times:
      “They’re making it on their own without putting their hand out,” said Kim Hopper, a professor of sociomedical sciences at the Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health who has studied homelessness in New York since the late 1970s.
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  53. steelhead
    • 2007 August 5, Jonathan Raban, “When Loggers Become Bloggers”, New York Times:
      Forks has broadband, houses that cost a quarter of those in Seattle and, right on its doorstep, the recreational opportunities that Seattleites so prize — fly-fishing for salmon and steelhead, the razor-edged mountains of the Olympic National Park, old-growth temperate rain forest (what little is left after generations of clear-cutting), mile after mile of wild and barely visited Pacific beaches.
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  54. textlike
    • 2007 August 5, Denise Caruso, “Testing Testers, Finding Flaws”, New York Times:
      While working on the Voynich codex, for example, Professor Rugg noticed that most previous researchers had used probability theory as a tool to test whether its textlike markings had been randomly generated.
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  55. tryna
  56. twitted
    • 2007 August 5, Stephen Metcalf, “The Road to Rightville”, New York Times:
      Ever since Ronald Reagan twitted Jimmy Carter with “there you go again,” the American right has carried itself with a swagger, confident the crowd will have its back.
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  57. ultramountaineering
  58. undervacationing
    • 2007 August 5, Walter Kirn, “Vacation, All I Never Wanted”, New York Times:
      The most widely cited diagnoses of our allegedly harmful undervacationing can be found by searching the Internet, the same Internet that even the dwindling number of full-vacation-takers are purportedly using to elevate their stress levels by logging on from beach resorts and national parks — where, according to concerned observers, they would be better off restricting themselves to restorative, out-of-cellphone-range pursuits like brisk morning swims and sunset nature walks.
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  59. unproclaimed
    • 2007 August 5, Robert Sullivan, “Grass Roots Rising”, New York Times:
      There are a few billionaires, working hard to give their wealth away, and there are even some Christian evangelicals, who have decided the earth is not theirs to trash, but the movement is mostly about shared beliefs, even if those beliefs are unproclaimed.
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  60. uptightness
    • 2007 August 5, Walter Kirn, “Vacation, All I Never Wanted”, New York Times:
      The duffel-bag-lugging vacations of my youth — the kind that are losing popularity now in part because of the day-spa, lake-house ways of some of the melancholic high-caste Francophiles who discern in the trend a spiritual uptightness — always struck me as forced, unnatural, compulsory.
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  61. viniferous
    • 2007 August 5, Tim Race, “Vitamin for the Heart or a Fruity Cabernet?”, New York Times:
      But last week, when the maker, NFI Consumer Products of Fayetteville, N.C., sent out media kits promoting the product’s nationwide rollout, the marketers mixed their viniferous metaphors.
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  62. vintneresque
  63. wooo
  64. wraithlike

Sequestered[edit]

  1. hominad
    • 2007 August 5, Jennifer Vanderbes, “Surf the Web, Walk the Streets”, New York Times:
      But the hominad is still a stranger, and the social networks that bind smaller cities, preventing people from ignoring one another, don’t exist in New York.
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  2. hominads
    • 2007 August 5, Jennifer Vanderbes, “Surf the Web, Walk the Streets”, New York Times:
      But human advertisements — or what I like to call hominads — also roam the city.
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  3. overcompetiveness = overcompetitiveness
    • 2007 August 5, Walter Kirn, “Vacation, All I Never Wanted”, New York Times:
      That fewer of us are doing so, it’s said, is a symptom of either anxious overcompetiveness (while I’m learning to fly-fish, that new guy down the hall is learning how to do my job); upward-mobility addiction (the cost of a 10-day Alaskan eco-trek is a down payment on a Lexus coupe!); the breakdown of the family (toasting s’mores for bored brats around a campfire is not a father’s duty anymore); or, perhaps, a complicated bitterness over the fact that surpassing France’s economy will never help us surpass its egotisms, so why bother aping the gourmet loafing that even most Frenchmen must sense has made them poorer?
      add
  4. roaders
    • 2007 August 5, Phil Patton, “The Virtues of Avoiding Interstates”, New York Times:
      The slow roaders favor back roads, parkways, motels and diners, instead of chain lodging and food.
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