User:Visviva/NYT 20070819

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This is a list of lowercase non-hyphenated single words found in the 2007-08-19 issue of the New York Times which did not have English entries in the English Wiktionary when this list was created (2009-02-11).

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161012 tokens ‧ 117968 valid lowercase tokens ‧ 12494 types ‧ 90 (~ 0.72%) words before cleaning ‧ 

2007-08-19[edit]

  1. baile *
    • 2007 August 19, Ben Sisario, “An Itinerant Refugee in a Hip-Hop World”, New York Times:
      After art school in Britain she began making music that was simple and handmade but had a staggering, far-reaching ambition, with flirty yet brutally evocative lyrics set against whip-crack electro beats, dancehall reggae and Brazilian baile funk.
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  2. balladlike
    • 2007 August 19, Ben Ratliff, “Jazz as It Is and Was, and Flamenco as It Can Be”, New York Times:
      This veteran jazz pianist’s new album, “Solo in Mondsee” (ECM), is a solo-piano record of improvisations, most of them balladlike and quite beautiful, even in their most sprawling phases.
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  3. bendings
  4. berbere *
    • 2007 August 19, “More Than Soul”, New York Times:
      At Zoma, dishes like tibs wett, beef and the spice mix called berbere slowly simmered into a delicious whole, are more lightly sauced, not swimming in spice-infused butter.
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  5. blockfront
    • 2007 August 19, Suzanne Slesin, “Small or Large, Uptown or Down?”, New York Times:
      The second stop is the 22-story Lucida, which fills the blockfront on Lexington Avenue between 85th and 86th Streets (the official address is 151 East 85th Street).
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  6. boulevardier
    • 2007 August 19, Alex Marshall, “The Extreme Boulevardier”, New York Times:
      The 19th century was the age of the flaneur and the boulevardier, figures who made strolling down Fifth Avenue or Broadway, often vividly attired, a fashionable activity worthy of their counterparts in Paris or London.
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  7. californicating
  8. caucusgoers
    • 2007 August 19, Leslie Wayne, “In a Must-Win State, Edwards Takes a Harsher Tone”, New York Times:
      The audiences were largely composed of older rural voters who are typical of caucusgoers and, under complicated caucus rules, have power greater than their actual numbers.
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  9. centerlight
    • 2007 August 19, Luc Sante, “On the Road Again”, New York Times:
      In the novel he inserts “mad to be saved,” while the roman candles become “fabulous” and they are “exploding like spiders across the stars and in the middle you see the blue centerlight pop and everybody goes ‘Awww!’ ”
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  10. certifiers
    • 2007 August 19, Andrew Martin, “How to Add Oomph to ‘Organic’”, New York Times:
      The National Organic Program doesn’t try to verify the authenticity of organics by itself, but instead relies on a network of third-party certifiers who are required to inspect organic farms and food companies and submit periodic reports.
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  11. chocolatelike
    • 2007 August 19, Jason Zinoman, “High-Energy Behemoth Devours Edinburgh”, New York Times:
      And, for something completely different, there is “Incarnat,” a brutal and heartbreaking dance show from Brazil that features miniportraits of self-abasement involving nudity, gobs of chocolatelike liquid and a variety of beastly physical violence.
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  12. coddlers
  13. comebacker
    • 2007 August 19, Ben Shpigel, “Win Is Tempered by Loss of Easley”, New York Times:
      Mota, who had a 13.50 earned run average on this trip, came in and retired López on a comebacker to end the inning.
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  14. concours *
  15. counterinsurgents
    • 2007 August 19, Buddhika Jayamaha, Wesley D. Smith, Jeremy Roebuck, Omar Mora, Edward Sandmeier, Yance T. Gray And Jeremy A. Murphy, “The War as We Saw It”, New York Times:
      Counterinsurgency is, by definition, a competition between insurgents and counterinsurgents for the control and support of a population.
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  16. counterplay
  17. cybersphere
    • 2007 August 19, Guy Trebay, “These Hills Still Talk to Him”, New York Times:
      The sexual frontier that once beckoned to adventurers as unalike as Gianni Versace and Michel Foucault has largely shifted to the cybersphere.
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  18. deconstructionist
    • 2007 August 19, Peter G. Davis, “From Salzburg, a Mozart-a-thon”, New York Times:
      At least one, David Hermann’s deconstructionist approach to “Ascanio in Alba,” pretty much annihilates the spirit of the teenage Mozart’s bubbly paean to true love.
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  19. dhol
    • 2007 August 19, Ben Sisario, “An Itinerant Refugee in a Hip-Hop World”, New York Times:
      “World Town” rewrites a Baltimore hip-hop anthem for a violent third-world ghetto; the dizzyingly abstract percussion loop of “BirdFlu” is spiked with Indian dhol drums and chicken squawks.
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  20. disguiser
    • 2007 August 19, Anne Eisenberg, “When a Television Is Suitable for Framing”, New York Times:
      Mrs. Angner also sells an additional TV disguiser: a treated glass, inserted in some frames, that is a mirror when the TV is off, but is transparent when the set is on ($839).
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  21. emphasizer
    • 2007 August 19, William Safire, “Gifts of Gab”, New York Times:
      Counterintuitively, the authors are down on the use of please as an emphasizer: “ ‘Would you please remember to include me on the email whenever you respond to a customer?’ conveys a sense of exasperation.
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  22. equilibrioception
    • 2007 August 19, Daniel B. Smith, “Without a Net”, New York Times:
      Aristotle failed to specify proprioception (the sense of how our body parts are positioned in space relative to one another), equilibrioception (the sense of linear acceleration and head position), thermoception (the sense of heat and cold) and nociception (the sense of pain).
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  23. fetishization
    • 2007 August 19, Daniel Patterson, “Green Day”, New York Times:
      As if $10-a-dozen farm eggs and $20-per-pound hand-assembled salami weren’t bad enough, our growing food fetishization has created a new produce category: luxury squash.
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  24. flaneur *
    • 2007 August 19, Alex Marshall, “The Extreme Boulevardier”, New York Times:
      The 19th century was the age of the flaneur and the boulevardier, figures who made strolling down Fifth Avenue or Broadway, often vividly attired, a fashionable activity worthy of their counterparts in Paris or London.
      add
  25. floodwall
    • 2007 August 19, “New Orleans Still at Risk”, New York Times:
      It built up a defensive floodwall on the east side of the Industrial Canal — to protect the largely abandoned Lower Ninth Ward — while leaving the more heavily populated Gentilly neighborhood on the west side exposed behind a lower wall.
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  26. hokily
    • 2007 August 19, Alessandra Stanley, “Say, Darling, Is It Frigid in Here?”, New York Times:
      It’s as hokily choreographed as any of VH1’s bio-reality shows, but it is dead serious about Mr. Baio’s commitment problem.
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  27. homefront
    • 2007 August 19, “On Terror”, New York Times:
      What is most dismaying about the books that Samantha Power reviewed in her essay is how belatedly “they allow one to begin to define a new approach to counterterrorism” by urging steps — protect civilians, differentiate among Muslims, secure the homefront, pursue the actual terrorists — that were obvious to hundreds of thousands, if not millions, of us who took to the streets to protest against the Iraq war back before it began.
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  28. homerless
    • 2007 August 19, Ben Shpigel, “Win Is Tempered by Loss of Easley”, New York Times:
      He ended the majors’ longest active homerless streak at 674 at-bats by lining John Lannan’s 2-1 pitch over the left-field wall in the first inning, drove in José Reyes to score the Mets’ second run, then scored from first on Wright’s fifth-inning double, sliding headfirst to avoid the tag.
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  29. hyperextended
    • 2007 August 19, Ben Shpigel, “Retirement Becomes a Thought for Wagner”, New York Times:
      DELGADO OUT AGAIN Carlos Delgado, held out of the lineup for a third consecutive game with a hyperextended left knee, took ground balls at first base and hit in the batting cage.
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  30. ineloquence
    • 2007 August 19, Dennis Lim, “A Generation Finds Its Mumble”, New York Times:
      Specimens of the genre share a low-key naturalism, low-fi production values and a stream of low-volume chatter often perceived as ineloquence.
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  31. marshalls
  32. meranti
    • 2007 August 19, Jay Romano, “Decks: Real Wood or a Look-Alike?”, New York Times:
      Homeowners can also use cedar, at $1.50 to $3 or more per foot, or exotic hardwoods like meranti from Southeast Asia or ipê from Brazil at about $3 a foot.
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  33. microchapters
    • 2007 August 19, Amy Finnerty, “Color Me Bad”, New York Times:
      He has a gift for ruthless analysis, and among the disjointed microchapters of his life story, there are exacting self-revelations every few pages.
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  34. midmarket
    • 2007 August 19, Ron Stodghill, “A Hotelier Is Breaking the Mold Once Again”, New York Times:
      Its current base includes the modestly priced Fairfield Inn brand, the midmarket Courtyard, the more upper-tier Marriott brand and the luxury Ritz-Carlton, but the company is aiming to capture a fresh crowd of younger, affluent travelers who want five-star amenities amid snazzy, more individualized surroundings, industry analysts say.
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  35. midmarriage
    • 2007 August 19, Alessandra Stanley, “Say, Darling, Is It Frigid in Here?”, New York Times:
      There is a noticeable shift in emphasis this season, a darkening of mood away from the premarital frolics of blind dates, Manolo Blahniks and Central Perk hookups to closely watched midmarriage malaise.
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  36. migra *
    • 2007 August 19, Dale Maharidge, “Escape From El Salvador”, New York Times:
      A new roadblock north of town was manned by mean-looking migra agents.
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  37. miniportraits
    • 2007 August 19, Jason Zinoman, “High-Energy Behemoth Devours Edinburgh”, New York Times:
      And, for something completely different, there is “Incarnat,” a brutal and heartbreaking dance show from Brazil that features miniportraits of self-abasement involving nudity, gobs of chocolatelike liquid and a variety of beastly physical violence.
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  38. monumentality
    • 2007 August 19, Christopher Hall, “A Prisoner With a Paintbrush, a Legacy at Risk”, New York Times:
      Unifying compositional elements — the World War II bomber that dominates the fourth mural, for example — lend a W.P.A.-era monumentality.
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  39. multiscreen
    • 2007 August 19, Valerie Cotsalas, “Factory Eyesores, Transformed”, New York Times:
      The town of Brookhaven plans to rezone the 19-acre site of a defunct sand mine in the hamlet of Middle Island, as well as a 13-acre former multiscreen movie theater and parking lots in the hamlet of Coram.
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  40. multisport
    • 2007 August 19, The Associated Press, “Nets’ Jefferson True to His School”, New York Times:
      Nets forward Richard Jefferson announced Friday that he was donating $3.5 million to his alma mater, the University of Arizona , to help build a multisport practice facility.
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  41. mumblecore
    • 2007 August 19, Dennis Lim, “A Generation Finds Its Mumble”, New York Times:
      More a loose collective or even a state of mind than an actual aesthetic movement, mumblecore concerns itself with the mundane vacillations of postcollegiate existence.
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  42. mumblings
    • 2007 August 19, Dennis Lim, “A Generation Finds Its Mumble”, New York Times:
      RECENT rumblings — perhaps one should say mumblings — indicate an emerging movement in American independent film.
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  43. nicknamers
    • 2007 August 19, Jonathan Miles, “Sanguine Sangria”, New York Times:
      The Hudson River Cafe, which opened in May, is tucked beneath the West Side Highway at 133rd Street, in West Harlem, on that still-gritty stretch of 12th Avenue along the Riverside Drive viaduct that hopeful real-estate nicknamers have dubbed “ViVa,” for Viaduct Valley.
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  44. noninclusion
  45. noninhalers
    • 2007 August 19, Liesl Schillinger, “Light ’Em if You Got ’Em”, New York Times:
      In her slim and jaunty new graphic novella, “These Things Ain’t Gonna Smoke Themselves,” the cartoonist Emily Flake riffs on her perverse, self-destructive habit for an audience of willful creative types like herself who know cigarettes are bad for them but can’t bear to join the ranks of safe, tedious noninhalers.
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  46. nonpolitically
  47. nonrunning
    • 2007 August 19, Paul Duchene, “For Sale: ’84 Model. Runs Great.”, New York Times:
      Never mind that the auction house expects the car to sell for more than $1.5 million — last February in Paris, Christie’s sold a nonrunning 1890 De Dion for $929,773 — the sale is just too upsetting.
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  48. overraced
  49. pattypans
    • 2007 August 19, Daniel Patterson, “Green Day”, New York Times:
      I discovered that cooking squash whole, like pattypans stewed in a rustic tomato sauce scented with chorizo and cilantro, leads to tender, deeply flavorful flesh.
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  50. pls
    • 2007 August 19, Chelsea Cain, “Grammar Police”, New York Times:
      Although reading text messages and I.M.’s is like trying to decipher vanity plates (2 hard, pls u r hurting my head), the approach works, peppering in clues and allowing the reader to do some independent gumshoe work.
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  51. porpoised
  52. postcollegiate
    • 2007 August 19, Dennis Lim, “A Generation Finds Its Mumble”, New York Times:
      More a loose collective or even a state of mind than an actual aesthetic movement, mumblecore concerns itself with the mundane vacillations of postcollegiate existence.
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  53. prescripted
    • 2007 August 19, Joe Rhodes, “Tom Green Works at Home (You Can Watch)”, New York Times:
      “This is not like a television show where you’ve got 150 people, writers, prescripted interviews and everything put together so that everything’s guaranteed to go great,” he said, one eye on the clock.
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  54. recontextualized
    • 2007 August 19, Peter G. Davis, “From Salzburg, a Mozart-a-thon”, New York Times:
      Is there another major composer whose output is more thoroughly reassessed, recontextualized and re-embraced by each new generation?
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  55. rookielike
    • 2007 August 19, Karen Crouse, “No Shortage of Culprits in Meltdown by the Jets”, New York Times:
      Chad Pennington , the Jets’ usually cool-headed veteran quarterback, made two rookielike mistakes in the first quarter, which resulted in Vikings scores.
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  56. sangrias
    • 2007 August 19, Jonathan Miles, “Sanguine Sangria”, New York Times:
      Happily, Mr. Gonzalez has a pair of sangrias on the menu, a white sangria that goes by the name of Under the Bridge and a red he calls the 12th Avenue Special.
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  57. schemings
  58. semidry
    • 2007 August 19, Howard G. Goldberg, “An Aperitif From Upstate”, New York Times:
      Rivendell’s 2006 SoHo Cellars Johannisberg riesling was voted the state’s best semidry riesling at the 22nd New York Wine and Food Classic this month.
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  59. shtreimel
    • 2007 August 19, Nicole Krauss, “The Walker and the Walk”, New York Times:
      My idea of a walk, influenced by Kazin and honed over these last nine years that I’ve lived in New York, involves a freewheeling thoughtfulness powered by the legs but fed by observation, a physical and mental stream of consciousness nudged this way and that by an infinite number of human variables: an old man doing his esoteric exercises, a lone glove dropped in the middle of a snowy sidewalk, an Orthodox Jew in a shtreimel.
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  60. shuttler
    • 2007 August 19, Agence France-Presse, “President Critical of Officials”, New York Times:
      The federation is investigating pledges of money and airline tickets that were reportedly made by Kang’s deputy, the former Malaysian shuttler Datuk Gunalan.
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  61. singspiel
    • 2007 August 19, Peter G. Davis, “From Salzburg, a Mozart-a-thon”, New York Times:
      More correctly called a sacred singspiel than an opera, this was just one of the many dramatic forms then in fashion that Mozart enthusiastically experimented with between childhood and adolescence.
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  62. slickered
    • 2007 August 19, “In Afghanistan, a War Gone Sour ... (3 Letters)”, New York Times:
      And finally, when war with Iraq came in response to the war resolution Congress let itself be slickered into passing, the administration sucked resources away from the Afghan conflict to smash Saddam Hussein and then to hold down the lid on the bubbling cauldron of violence Mr. Bush’s invasion had created there.
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  63. streambeds
  64. subprimes
  65. superbabe
    • 2007 August 19, ZoË Wolff, “A Beautiful Duet”, New York Times:
      On a recent Saturday the indie-rock superbabe took the stage at Union Hall in Brooklyn and warned a group of guests that the music they were about to hear was highly inappropriate for the occasion.
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  66. thermoception
    • 2007 August 19, Daniel B. Smith, “Without a Net”, New York Times:
      Aristotle failed to specify proprioception (the sense of how our body parts are positioned in space relative to one another), equilibrioception (the sense of linear acceleration and head position), thermoception (the sense of heat and cold) and nociception (the sense of pain).
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  67. timebound
    • 2007 August 19, Christine Kenneally, “Thinking Out Loud”, New York Times:
      Because speech is timebound and words can come only one after the other, the way we stall, stumble and start again provides clues to the way we render thought with sound.
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  68. triggermen
    • 2007 August 19, Buddhika Jayamaha, Wesley D. Smith, Jeremy Roebuck, Omar Mora, Edward Sandmeier, Yance T. Gray And Jeremy A. Murphy, “The War as We Saw It”, New York Times:
      Local Iraqis readily testified to American investigators that Iraqi police and Army officers escorted the triggermen and helped plant the bomb.
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  69. ultrahip
    • 2007 August 19, Ron Stodghill, “A Hotelier Is Breaking the Mold Once Again”, New York Times:
      IN the world according to Ian Schrager , the master of the ultrahip hotel, there’s no greater currency than a boldface name checking into a stylish guest room or hanging out in the chic bar or restaurant. Mr. Schrager cut his teeth among the in-crowd in the late 1970s and early ’80s, as co-founder of the Studio 54 and Palladium nightclubs in New York City, and has since courted the slender, fashionable and martini-prone with such gusto — from the Royalton and Paramount hotels in Manhattan to the Delano in South Beach and the Mondrian in West Hollywood — that he has earned rock-star status of his own.
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  70. unaffecting
    • 2007 August 19, Julia Scheeres, “Hostile Takeover”, New York Times:
      “Power Play” is absorbing yet unaffecting.
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  71. unfamilial
    • 2007 August 19, Melena Ryzik, “In the Land of Nannies and Poodles”, New York Times:
      Their film version of the best-selling roman à clef about the distinctly unfamilial lives of Manhattan’s elite has an anthropological perspective, complete with museum-style dioramas of that strange society known as the Upper East Side.
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  72. unhip
    • 2007 August 19, Ron Stodghill, “A Hotelier Is Breaking the Mold Once Again”, New York Times:
      Yet on a brisk morning last September, in the fashionably dim corridors of his Gramercy Park Hotel, Mr. Schrager found himself strolling alongside a new and decidedly unhip admirer, a strait-laced septuagenarian who, incidentally, has quite a reputation as a hotelier himself.
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  73. unparagraphed
    • 2007 August 19, Luc Sante, “On the Road Again”, New York Times:
      Contrary to legend, the scroll was not a roll of teletype paper but a series of large sheets of tracing paper that Kerouac cut to fit and taped together, and it is not unpunctuated — merely unparagraphed, which makes a certain physical demand on the reader, who is deprived of the usual rest stops.
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  74. untrivial
  75. vacs
    • 2007 August 19, “Letters”, New York Times:
      “Strip-mall day spas” instead of vacs?
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  76. wheatpacking
    • 2007 August 19, Melena Ryzik, “A Harmonic Convergence in Union Square”, New York Times:
      “We call it the wheatpacking district,” said Lisa Blau, who with Amanda Freeman founded VitalJuiceDaily.com , an e-mail newsletter devoted to healthy living that they publish from an office in the neighborhood.
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  77. windbreaking
    • 2007 August 19, Charles Mcgrath, “Where the Boys Aren’t”, New York Times:
      Excitable bouts of windbreaking will not endear you.”
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  78. yahooing
    • 2007 August 19, Luc Sante, “On the Road Again”, New York Times:
      Cassady, with his need to move, his vast yahooing enthusiasm and his insatiable priapic drive, could have stepped out of Western legend.
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Sequestered[edit]

  1. ommming
    • 2007 August 19, Melena Ryzik, “A Harmonic Convergence in Union Square”, New York Times:
      On a recent Wednesday, Ms. Bird was ommming away the city’s distractions at the free weekly yoga class in the park.
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  2. gruntmanship
    • 2007 August 19, William Safire, “Gifts of Gab”, New York Times:
      “SEND: the essential guide to email for office and home” (Knopf, $20), by David Shipley and Will Schwalbe, helps us to avert the pitfalls in the pervasive new correspondence through gruntmanship.
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  3. mumblecorps
    • 2007 August 19, Dennis Lim, “A Generation Finds Its Mumble”, New York Times:
      There are indeed striking differences among the so-called mumblecorps. Mr. Bujalski, 30, is the elder statesman, and his movies are the most artful and sophisticated of the bunch, not least for being shot on film instead of handheld video.
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  4. schmungs
    • 2007 August 19, Liesl Schillinger, “Light ’Em if You Got ’Em”, New York Times:
      “Lungs, schmungs, it’s the crow’s feet and Farrah Fawcett lines that put the fear of God into me,” she writes.
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  5. zavinac = zavináč (and not English)
    • 2007 August 19, William Safire, “Gifts of Gab”, New York Times:
      (Henceforth, in giving my e-mail address orally, I will say “safireonlanguage, zavinac enwhytimes.com’’” and trigger a fusillade from Prague.)
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