User:Visviva/NYT 20070828

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This is a list of lowercase non-hyphenated single words found in the 2007-08-28 issue of the New York Times which did not have English entries in the English Wiktionary when this list was created (2009-02-11).

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86239 tokens ‧ 63679 valid lowercase tokens ‧ 8371 types ‧ 33 (~ 0.394%) words before cleaning ‧ 

2007-08-28[edit]

  1. authorless
    • 2007 August 28, Celia Mcgee, “Famous Friends on Tour for a Halberstam Book”, New York Times:
      An authorless national author tour “doesn’t seem to me to have been done before,” said Constance Sayre, a principal in the Manhattan publishing consulting firm Market Partners International.
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  2. bioidentical
    • 2007 August 28, Roni Caryn Rabin, “For a Low-Dose Hormone, Take Your Pick”, New York Times:
      Many women seeking natural remedies have turned to compounding pharmacies, druggists who promise so-called bioidentical hormones that are chemically synthesized but have the same molecular structure as hormones produced by a woman’s body.
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  3. bioidenticals
    • 2007 August 28, Roni Caryn Rabin, “For a Low-Dose Hormone, Take Your Pick”, New York Times:
      Proponents of bioidenticals suggest that they are safer than other hormones because they mimic a woman’s hormones.
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  4. blenderized
    • 2007 August 28, Ben Ratliff, “Headliner Can’t Make It? Here’s a First-Class Fill-In”, New York Times:
      He has returned, leading small jazz bands, and the one he led on Sunday had a curious duality. Mr. Williams is a crowd pleaser, with a neat synthesis of John Coltrane’s and Cannonball Adderley’s phrasing and harmonic language; his pianist, Eric Lewis, was a crowd-riler, moving from ostinatos to blenderized whirls of notes, hitting the keys about as hard as anyone can, lodging his solos into your neck.
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  5. captopril
    • 2007 August 28, Larry Rohter, “As Brazil Defends Its Bounty, Rules Ensnare Scientists”, New York Times:
      In the 1970s, the Squibb pharmaceutical company used venom from the Brazilian arrowhead viper to help develop captopril, used to treat hypertension and congestive heart failure, without payment of the royalties Brazilians think are due them.
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  6. carpetbagging
    • 2007 August 28, Dave Kehr, “New DVDs”, New York Times:
      Though based on a story by Elmore Leonard, “3:10 to Yuma” seems just as much a reaction to the two big carpetbagging westerns of the 1950s: Fred Zinnemann ’s “High Noon” (1952) and George Stevens’s “Shane” (1953), in which Mr. Heflin plays a similarly humiliated homesteader.
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  7. flyout
  8. forkfuls
    • 2007 August 28, Christopher Maag, “G.O.P. Zeroes In on a Democrat It Sees as a Fluke Winner”, New York Times:
      ZANESVILLE, Ohio — Rushing between campaign events at the Muskingum County Fair, Zack Space trotted to a secluded picnic table, sat down, and shoveled forkfuls of grilled chicken into his mouth.
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  9. fungoes
  10. hijiki *
    • 2007 August 28, C. Claiborne Ray, “Suspect Seaweed”, New York Times:
      A. Hijiki, the branched seaweed frequently used in small amounts in salads and garnishes, and other kinds of seaweed do contain more arsenic than other foods, but no arsenic-related health problems have been traced to hijiki in the United States.
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  11. megacrops
  12. midmonth
    • 2007 August 28, “What Looks and Sounds Like a Bailout?”, New York Times:
      By midmonth, when the Fed cut the lending rate it charges federally insured banks to borrow directly from the Fed, the move was viewed more as a way to calm the markets than to grease their wheels, mainly because it was of no direct use to nonbank lenders reeling from the credit crunch — like Countrywide, the nation’s largest mortgage lender.
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  13. needlelike
  14. nongambling
    • 2007 August 28, Keith Bradsher, “Bigger Than Las Vegas? That’s Macao’s Bet”, New York Times:
      “If you look at Macao, there are no or virtually no nongaming revenues,” whereas nongambling revenues exceed gambling revenues in Las Vegas, said William P. Weidner, the president and chief operating officer of Las Vegas Sands.
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  15. nongaming
    • 2007 August 28, Keith Bradsher, “Bigger Than Las Vegas? That’s Macao’s Bet”, New York Times:
      “If you look at Macao, there are no or virtually no nongaming revenues,” whereas nongambling revenues exceed gambling revenues in Las Vegas, said William P. Weidner, the president and chief operating officer of Las Vegas Sands.
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  16. nonindustrialized
    • 2007 August 28, Nicholas Bakalar, “Baby Talk Crosses Cultural Line”, New York Times:
      “This is the first empirical demonstration that in a nonliterate, nonindustrialized indigenous culture, people are able to recognize meaning in a language they don’t speak,” said Gregory A. Bryant, a co-author of the paper and an assistant professor of communications at the University of California , Los Angeles.
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  17. nonliterate
    • 2007 August 28, Nicholas Bakalar, “Baby Talk Crosses Cultural Line”, New York Times:
      “This is the first empirical demonstration that in a nonliterate, nonindustrialized indigenous culture, people are able to recognize meaning in a language they don’t speak,” said Gregory A. Bryant, a co-author of the paper and an assistant professor of communications at the University of California , Los Angeles.
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  18. nonprimate
  19. nontransgender
    • 2007 August 28, “Letters”, New York Times:
      It’s unscientific to require an explanation for gay or transgender identities but not heterosexual, nontransgender identities.
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  20. protobacco
  21. rediscussion
    • 2007 August 28, Andrew E. Kramer, “Kazakhs Suspend Permits for Oil Field”, New York Times:
      Eni released a subdued statement Monday saying only that it had "received a letter in the last few days with an offer for friendly rediscussion of the contract."
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  22. retraumatized
    • 2007 August 28, Amanda Schaffer, “Not a Game: Simulation to Lessen War Trauma”, New York Times:
      One risk of introducing potent material too fast is that a veteran could become retraumatized and perhaps unwilling to continue other kinds of therapy, as well.
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  23. sermonette
    • 2007 August 28, Ben Ratliff, “Headliner Can’t Make It? Here’s a First-Class Fill-In”, New York Times:
      One, “Thoughts and Prayers,” was for the drummer Jo Jones; it included a sermonette for the high-hat cymbal. Mr. Hamilton dedicated another, “Just Play the Melody,” to Mr. Roach.
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  24. suitelike
    • 2007 August 28, Ben Ratliff, “Headliner Can’t Make It? Here’s a First-Class Fill-In”, New York Times:
      As much now as in the ’50s and ’60s, Mr. Hamilton writes and writes and writes, and his pieces don’t stay on one road; they change dynamics and strategies, suitelike even when they’re not suites proper, with articulated melodies and room for pointed solos.
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  25. supermice
    • 2007 August 28, Abigail Zuger, M.D., “Collaborators in a Quest for Human Perfection”, New York Times:
      In fact, one of Carrel’s long-lived experiments at the Rockefeller Institute consisted of a large colony of mice bred specifically to create “heroic” supermice — large, fit and savage.
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  26. teetotaling
    • 2007 August 28, Margy Rochlin, “A Veteran of Comedy Rediscovers His Dark Side”, New York Times:
      But even with successes as the charming, teetotaling bartender Sam Malone on “Cheers” and the crabby but good-hearted Bronx doctor on “Becker,” the positive response to Mr. Danson’s dark, layered and vulnerable portrayal of the blue-jeaned, self-obsessed Frobisher has been as much a surprise to him as to television critics and viewers.
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Sequestered[edit]

  1. nonchimps
    • 2007 August 28, John Tierney, “A World of Eloquence in an Upturned Palm”, New York Times:
      Chimps are not so subtle, but they can understand “Gimme” even when it’s coming from nonchimps. Dr. Pollick found that that she could get a chimp to give her something by pointing to the object and making the palm-up gesture.
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