User:Visviva/NYT 20070902

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to: navigation, search
← Previous (2007-09-01) Words harvested from the New York Times, 2007-09-02
  • List status: open
→ Next (2007-09-03)

This is a list of lowercase non-hyphenated single words found in the 2007-09-02 issue of the New York Times which did not have English entries in the English Wiktionary when this list was created (2009-02-11).

[ see all NYT pages ] - [ see all tracking lists ]

183267 tokens ‧ 134662 valid lowercase tokens ‧ 13246 types ‧ 87 (~ 0.657%) words before cleaning ‧ 

2007-09-02[edit]

  1. antidevelopment
    • 2007 September 2, Amanda Griscom Little, “Not in Whose Backyard?”, New York Times:
      Environmental-justice advocates take pains to assert that they are neither antidevelopment nor anti-industry.
      add
  2. appraisingly
    • 2007 September 2, Alex Mindlin, “The Black Holes of Seymour Avenue”, New York Times:
      Sandra Unger, a longtime neighborhood resident, padded out of her house and over to the Waring Avenue hole on a recent Monday, examining it appraisingly.
      add
  3. blitzers
  4. brownface
    • 2007 September 2, Terrence Rafferty, “Elmore Leonard’s Men of Few Words, in a Few Words”, New York Times:
      The problem isn’t so much Lancaster’s unconvincing brownface makeup — though it looks as if it had been applied by the same heavy laborers who blacktopped Laurence Olivier for “Othello” — as it is the extremely un-Leonardian softness of his presence.
      add
  5. burek *
    • 2007 September 2, “Bus Stops”, New York Times:
      Try the spinach-and-cheese burek, with its pure nutlike flavor.
      add
  6. bureks
    • 2007 September 2, “Bus Stops”, New York Times:
      If the bureks (phyllo-encased savory pastries) come straight from the oven, as they do every 20 minutes or so, they are superb, the phyllo crust light and delicately flaky.
      add
  7. buzziest
    • 2007 September 2, Dwight Garner, “Inside the List”, New York Times:
      It’s had good reviews, independent booksellers made it a Book Sense pick for August, New York magazine has called it “maybe the buzziest serious novel of the summer” and Horan, 59, has been everywhere on TV and radio.
      add
  8. chamberlike
    • 2007 September 2, Nate Chinen, “That Ticking Sound? It’s Beck’s New Single”, New York Times:
      “Fantasy” (Palmetto) is Mr. Mays’s other recent effort, and on it he presents chamberlike originals and canonical reinterpretations (again including Debussy, Bach and Scriabin).
      add
  9. colonialization
    • 2007 September 2, “‘Age of Betrayal’”, New York Times:
      4) As a safety valve: “We escape the menace and peril of socialism and agrarianism, as England has escaped them, by a policy of colonialization and conquest,” Henry Watterson, editor of The Louisville Courier-Journal, told a New York reporter the month Teddy Roosevelt charged up San Juan Hill with his Rough Riders. 5) Finally (young readers beware), comes the Marxism: “New markets must be found ‘if American operatives are to be employed the year round,’ a State Department paper affirmed.”
      add
  10. corporatized
    • 2007 September 2, N. R. Kleinfield, “As 9/11 Draws Near, a Debate Rises: How Much Tribute Is Enough?”, New York Times:
      “Six years later, we can see that a lot of people have used 9/11 for some gain,” said Matt Brosseau, 27, of Westfield, N.J. He sees the public tributes as “crassly corporatized and co-opted by false patriots.”
      add
  11. countback
  12. cybersurfers
    • 2007 September 2, Scott Shane, “Logged In and Sharing Gossip, er, Intelligence”, New York Times:
      It remains to be seen, however, whether technology alone can bring to secretive bureaucracies the connectedness that comes naturally to cybersurfers in the outside world.
      add
  13. cytotechnology
    • 2007 September 2, “Wendy Wu and Vinod Balachandran”, New York Times:
      His mother is the director of cytotechnology at the Albany College of Pharmacy of Union University.
      add
  14. defeminized
    • 2007 September 2, Kathryn Harrison, “To Die For”, New York Times:
      Because the journalist Susan Ward is “striking,” her “rosebud mouth” must be balanced, defeminized, by her “large forehead” (i.e., intelligence).
      add
  15. dehabitated
    • 2007 September 2, Jennifer Schuessler, “Starting Over”, New York Times:
      And on every dehabitated continent, forests and grasslands would reclaim our farms and parking lots as animals began a slow parade back to Eden.
      add
  16. disablingly
    • 2007 September 2, Anthony Julius, “A People and a Nation”, New York Times:
      “Jews and Power,” then, is a Jewish book, though the topic is of immense — one might say disablingly immense — interest to anti-Semites, too.
      add
  17. fashionism
  18. flashery
    • 2007 September 2, Heidi Julavits, “The Kitchen God’s Girlfriend”, New York Times:
      Maggie shadows Sam — long-haired, sexy, publicity-allergic, an “old-fashioned formalist” (i.e., nothing like those showboating Ming Tsai types back in America) — a philosopher-chef prone to such Zen Master flashery as “food should be more than food.”
      add
  19. gamay *
    • 2007 September 2, Howard G. Goldberg, “A Beaujolais That’s Magic”, New York Times:
      This light, fruity red hints at Burgundian depth while displaying the charm that endears gamay, the Beaujolais grape, to regulars in nearby Lyon’s bistros.
      add
  20. geiserlike
    • 2007 September 2, Dorothy Spears, “Thinking Glacially, Acting Artfully”, New York Times:
      “Olafur is very much part of newly honed generation of artists, finding their best outlet through international exhibitions,” said Madeleine Grynsztejn, a curator at the San Francisco Modern and one of the show’s primary organizers. Ms. Grynsztejn first exhibited Mr. Eliasson’s reflective lake with a geiserlike steam spout at the Carnegie International in Pittsburgh in 1999.
      add
  21. guestrooms
    • 2007 September 2, Hilary Howard, “A Green Hotel Grows in Greensboro”, New York Times:
      The hotel, named after a former cotton mill nearby, will have a warehouse look, above, and loft-style guestrooms, all with original art on the walls.
      add
  22. iroko
    • 2007 September 2, Pilar Viladas, “A Narrow Escape”, New York Times:
      Stelle and Lloyd wanted the interiors to feel as warm as possible, so iroko, an African teak, was used for the end walls, the kitchen ceiling and the window frames.
      add
  23. joshes
    • 2007 September 2, Eric Dash, “Reeling In the College-Bound”, New York Times:
      Heading out to sea, he joshes with his 16 crew members as they prepare for the start of a regatta. Mr. Meyers’s love of finance is reflected in the name of his boat: Numbers.
      add
  24. jostlings
    • 2007 September 2, Brendan I. Koerner, “Wine, Neither Shaken Nor Stirred”, New York Times:
      Even after downing several glasses of pinot noir, in order to affect a partygoer’s clumsiness, my jostlings of the pyramid caused almost no discernible movement.
      add
  25. krainerwurst
    • 2007 September 2, “Bus Stops”, New York Times:
      Aside from 10 sausages, which include thin, bright bratwurst, lightly smoked krainerwurst and spicy chorizo, you select from six breads, 11 toppings and six sauces.
      add
  26. larkily
    • 2007 September 2, William Deresiewicz, “His Generation”, New York Times:
      Paul’s account of his childhood and youth is energetic, deeply felt and often quite funny in a larkily satiric way: his parents’ emotional withdrawal after his brother’s death; the petty sadism of institutional authority (Gaullism, it seems, writ small); and always, the raging hormones of adolescence.
      add
  27. lifeguarding
    • 2007 September 2, James P. Othmer, “The Summer We Went Broke”, New York Times:
      And also because I made more in a day mixing mortar and laying block than any of my friends did in a week of lifeguarding, baby-sitting or stocking shelves at the Grand Union.
      add
  28. linebacking
    • 2007 September 2, “N.F.C. East”, New York Times:
      Seattle’s linebacking threesome — Lofa Tatupu, Leroy Hill and Julian Peterson — may be the best anywhere.
      add
  29. lobotomization
    • 2007 September 2, Charles Isherwood, “Serious Conductor Answers the Call of the Roller Disco”, New York Times:
      Those inclined to lament golden ages long past might be inclined to put forth this distinguished musician’s latest gig as evidence of the lobotomization of musical theater in recent years.
      add
  30. malbecs
    • 2007 September 2, Brendan I. Koerner, “Wine, Neither Shaken Nor Stirred”, New York Times:
      Many people instead create rickety bottle pyramids, which can collapse when jostled — an all-too-common occurrence when malbecs and rieslings are being quaffed in great quantity.
      add
  31. mavenhood
    • 2007 September 2, William Safire, “The Way Forward”, New York Times:
      The language mavenhood is becoming incensed.
      add
  32. megacomplexes
    • 2007 September 2, Kirk Semple, “The Rise of the Machines”, New York Times:
      The ease of these machines made weight lifting more attractive to a broader range of people and helped move the activity from the male-dominated domain of body builders in dank Y.M.C.A. basements to today’s well-lighted fitness megacomplexes, complete with juice bars, baby-sitting nurseries and classes in Pilates Magic Circle and Warrior Flow Yoga.
      add
  33. meltage
    • 2007 September 2, Jonathan Miles, “Barkeep, There’s a ...”, New York Times:
      While the resulting ice balls make a dramatic visual statement, their size and shape also serve a functional purpose, chilling the cocktail with little meltage.
      add
  34. microtrend
    • 2007 September 2, Jonathan Miles, “Barkeep, There’s a ...”, New York Times:
      Replace the resin with real ice, and substitute an orchid or rose petal or other edible niblet for the fly, and you’ve got the latest microtrend in upscale mixology — or at least in precious garnishes.
      add
  35. midperiod
    • 2007 September 2, Geoffrey Wheatcroft, “Friendly Fire”, New York Times:
      Draper’s philippic dealt with anti-Communism and rewritten history, and didn’t mention Iraq, Israel or the Middle East, but then Kirkpatrick was what we might now call a midperiod neocon.
      add
  36. minifilm
  37. misprosecuted
    • 2007 September 2, Nick Gillespie, “Democratic Vistas”, New York Times:
      Although the misconceived and misprosecuted war in Iraq was the issue most responsible for their return to power, Congressional Democrats have yet to put forth a coherent or convincing program to end American military involvement there.
      add
  38. motormouthed
    • 2007 September 2, Terrence Rafferty, “Elmore Leonard’s Men of Few Words, in a Few Words”, New York Times:
      Although the bad guy in “Yuma” (Glenn Ford in the original, Russell Crowe in the remake, fighting to a draw) isn’t nearly as loquacious as, say, Samuel L. Jackson ’s motormouthed sociopath in “Jackie Brown” (based on Mr. Leonard’s “Rum Punch”), he’s still considerably more verbose than the tense rancher guarding him.
      add
  39. moviedom
    • 2007 September 2, Michael Cieply, “For Studio Chiefs, the End of the Revolving Door?”, New York Times:
      Mr. Grey, who declined to be interviewed for this column, probably wouldn’t be cheered to know that moviedom and its many chroniclers thrill to his perceived misadventures mostly because they miss the blood sport that once came with a top executive’s fall.
      add
  40. multiarmed
    • 2007 September 2, Lynn Hirschberg, “The Music Man”, New York Times:
      A massive brass Buddha is flanked by equally enormous speakers; vintage cardboard cutouts of John, Paul, George and Ringo circa "Help!" are placed around a multiarmed statue of Vishnu.
      add
  41. multistation
    • 2007 September 2, Kirk Semple, “The Rise of the Machines”, New York Times:
      Like the Universal multistation gym, the Nautilus made exercise simpler.
      add
  42. multivenue
    • 2007 September 2, Elisabetta Povoledo, “Outbreak of Insomnia Is Spreading”, New York Times:
      WHEN Paris held its first Nuit Blanche — a frenetic all-night, multivenue cultural bash — in 2002, few could have imagined that five years later White Night fever would be sweeping Europe ’s capitals, and spreading to other cities.
      add
  43. multiweek
    • 2007 September 2, James P. Othmer, “The Summer We Went Broke”, New York Times:
      FOR the first 15 summers of my life, my family took multiweek vacations on the Jersey Shore and in Montauk.
      add
  44. neighborhoody
    • 2007 September 2, Peter Mehlman, “Dodging Potholes Along Memory Lane”, New York Times:
      Still, I try to fit in: opting for a hotel on a neighborhoody street on upper Broadway (the room edges out my old apartment for square footage), taking subways (embarrassingly slow with a MetroCard), except when I don’t (barking out unsure routes to cab drivers).
      add
  45. nonauthors
    • 2007 September 2, Pagan Kennedy, “A Space for Us”, New York Times:
      “If nothing else, MySpace will show nonauthors how pathetic and lonely most writers really are.
      add
  46. noncloying
    • 2007 September 2, Nate Chinen, “That Ticking Sound? It’s Beck’s New Single”, New York Times:
      He and his partners, the trumpeter Marvin Stamm and the cellist Alisa Horn, manage to imbue the material with a noncloying kind of romance.
      add
  47. nonimplicated
    • 2007 September 2, Liesl Schillinger, “Let Them Eat Shortcake”, New York Times:
      Part of an earlier generation of refugees, imbued with nostalgia for the storied, soulful Eastern Europe of her parents’ past, Lewycka seems to look on the incoming wave with less indulgence and more mortification than a nonimplicated person might.
      add
  48. overemote
    • 2007 September 2, “Nonfiction Chronicle”, New York Times:
      Hepburn experienced dark moments, as we discover, but she did not overemote.
      add
  49. ponytailed
    • 2007 September 2, Liesl Schillinger, “Let Them Eat Shortcake”, New York Times:
      The young woman behind the counter at the beach boutique on Block Island was blond, ponytailed and suntanned.
      add
  50. prepractice
    • 2007 September 2, Paula Disbrowe, “The Hot Table”, New York Times:
      The Austin club is across the street from Tam Deli and Café, an unassuming Vietnamese restaurant and a convenient stop for prepractice banh mi, sandwiches served on French rolls.
      add
  51. psychoanalyzing
    • 2007 September 2, Carl M. Cannon, “Disclosed”, New York Times:
      He quotes Bush, approvingly, as saying about Cheney, “Look, we don’t sit around psychoanalyzing each other.”
      add
  52. pulverizers
    • 2007 September 2, Frederick Kaufman, “They Eat What We Are”, New York Times:
      Thus the baroque collections of viscometers, desiccators and pulverizers, the vials brimming with dog excreta laced with acid, the racks of test tubes filled with cat urine, the containers of canine and feline gastric fluid and the retorts of dog and cat blood.
      add
  53. redemptivist
    • 2007 September 2, Holland Cotter, “On My Own Road”, New York Times:
      Its redemptivist impulse powers Thoreau’s perambulations.
      add
  54. roughish
    • 2007 September 2, Terrence Rafferty, “Elmore Leonard’s Men of Few Words, in a Few Words”, New York Times:
      It can be a cliffhanger, though, as it is in Edwin Sherin’s 1971 film of the western novel that Mr. Leonard himself is fondest of, “Valdez Is Coming,” a movie that has a roughish time overcoming the casting of Burt Lancaster as the titular Mexican lawman-avenger.
      add
  55. scena *
    • 2007 September 2, Matthew Gurewitsch, “Singing the Lament of a Fugitive Slave”, New York Times:
      “I couldn’t write an instrumental work without having a secret personal dramatic scena attached.”
      add
  56. shebude
  57. shinhatsubai
    • 2007 September 2, Saki Knafo, “Sheepish on 41st Street”, New York Times:
      In Japan, the phenomenon called shinhatsubai — the endless search for newness — has been an obsession since the country began a relentless pursuit of modernization after World War II. One result is a lack of love for old things, like used books.
      add
  58. showstopping
    • 2007 September 2, Franz Lidz, “The Actors Sing, the Director Suffers, the Film Survives”, New York Times:
      Later he has an elective circumcision to please the flame-haired Ms. Winslet, whose showstopping entrance is announced by the Buena Vista Social Club’s “Cuarto de Tula,” replete with gyrating, hose-wielding firefighters.
      add
  59. streambeds
    • 2007 September 2, Matt Gross, “The Frugal Road Trip”, New York Times:
      They lost all their gasoline because of a leak, had to drag the car through streambeds and once wound up being towed by a horse.
      add
  60. subletters
    • 2007 September 2, Gregory Beyer, “Handing Over the Keys, Fingers Crossed”, New York Times:
      Matthieu Bouchout, the owner of HarmoNYCity, a small real estate firm specializing in short-term furnished rentals, said his company takes more precautions than most amateur subletters, requiring that visitors provide identification and references.
      add
  61. supercapitalism
    • 2007 September 2, Stephen Kotkin, “Dangers of a Turbocharged Economy”, New York Times:
      Together, newly powerful shoppers and shareholders of this supercapitalism drove a decline in labor unions and a frenzy by corporations desperate to buy some market advantage in Washington.
      add
  62. sweatless
  63. twitterer
    • 2007 September 2, Anne Eisenberg, “Do the Mash (Even if You Don’t Know All the Steps)”, New York Times:
      In a typical application, Popfly mashes together the feed from Twitter, a messaging service, with a tool that resolves the location of the twitterer into latitude and longitude and plots the information on Microsoft’s Virtual Earth.
      add
  64. ultranuisance
    • 2007 September 2, Randy Cohen, “A Soldier’s Gift”, New York Times:
      That is, it would be estimable if you had either the car or, if you are understandably daunted by the ultranuisance of New York parking, the cash waiting for him when he returned in November.
      add
  65. unaging
    • 2007 September 2, Terrence Rafferty, “Technicolor Dreamboat”, New York Times:
      Age notwithstanding, none of these men seem interested in sailing to Byzantium anyway: Justine’s got them all on the last stage to someplace wilder and scarier, where Yeats’s “monuments of unaging intellect” are thoroughly beside the point.
      add
  66. unairbrushed
    • 2007 September 2, Liesl Schillinger, “Let Them Eat Shortcake”, New York Times:
      Rich and strange in detail, magnanimous yet unsparing in tone, it presents an unairbrushed portrait of two quarreling middle-aged Ukrainian-English sisters, Vera and Nadia, who reconcile to save their stubborn father from a disastrous late marriage.
      add
  67. unbiodegradable
    • 2007 September 2, Jennifer Schuessler, “Starting Over”, New York Times:
      But it’s hard to imagine an alien archaeologist finding poetry in the remote Pacific atolls awash in virtually unbiodegradable plastic bottles, bags and Q-tip shafts, or in the quadrillions of nurdles, microscopic plastic bits in the oceans — they currently outweigh all the plankton by a factor of six — that would continue to cycle uncorrupted through the guts of sea creatures until an enterprising microbe evolved to break them down.
      add
  68. underrealized
    • 2007 September 2, Bee Wilson, “Secret Histories”, New York Times:
      Murray’s characters are both overdetermined and underrealized.
      add
  69. understocked
    • 2007 September 2, Jesse Mckinley, “For Struggling Tribe, Dark Side to a Windfall”, New York Times:
      Just off Highway 101, past an understocked grocery and an overstocked bar, sits a row of ragged mobile homes behind a chain link fence topped with barbed wire.
      add
  70. unelect
    • 2007 September 2, Nick Gillespie, “Democratic Vistas”, New York Times:
      In detailing the machinations of superrich Democratic activists like George Soros , who blew through close to $30 million of his wealth in an unsuccessful attempt to unelect George W. Bush in 2004, and barricade-bashing cyberpunks like Markos Moulitsas Zúniga, founder of the popular Daily Kos Web site, whose participant-readers attack all things Republican with the same fervor they showed when championing the already forgotten Ned Lamont in his unsuccessful attempt to unseat Senator Joseph Lieberman in 2006, Bai reluctantly and repeatedly owns up to a hard truth: “There’s not much reason to think that the Democratic Party has suddenly overcome its confusion about the passing of the industrial economy and the cold war, events that left the party, over the last few decades, groping for some new philosophical framework.”
      add
  71. unfacetiously
    • 2007 September 2, Charles Isherwood, “Serious Conductor Answers the Call of the Roller Disco”, New York Times:
      What’s more, in describing how he went about creating new arrangements for songs working primarily from the movie soundtrack, Mr. Stern casually — and unfacetiously — referred to these infectious, flossy pop nuggets as “tone poems.”
      add
  72. unfeminist
    • 2007 September 2, Guy Trebay, “Admit It. You Love It. It Matters.”, New York Times:
      DEPENDING on who is doing the talking, fashion is bourgeois, girly, unfeminist, conformist, elitist, frivolous, anti-intellectual and a cultural stepchild barely worth the attention paid to even the most minor arts.
      add
  73. unionless
  74. urbanness
    • 2007 September 2, Joyce Cohen, “The Call of the Suburbs”, New York Times:
      And yet, more and more, she found herself wanting respite from Manhattan ’s relentless urbanness.
      add
  75. utopianism
    • 2007 September 2, Anthony Julius, “A People and a Nation”, New York Times:
      It has always been an aspect of Zionism’s utopianism, this vision of Jewish-Arab cooperation, a mutual flourishing in the one region.
      add
  76. whirly
    • 2007 September 2, Jim Lewis, “The Revelator”, New York Times:
      Good morning and please listen to me: Denis Johnson is a true American artist, and “Tree of Smoke” is a tremendous book, a strange entertainment, very long but very fast, a great whirly ride that starts out sad and gets sadder and sadder, loops unpredictably out and around, and then lurches down so suddenly at the very end that it will make your stomach flop.
      add

Sequestered[edit]

  1. dongpo
    • 2007 September 2, Heidi Julavits, “The Kitchen God’s Girlfriend”, New York Times:
      While the Maggie-Sam romance achieves a wincing tolerability by the long-foregone conclusion, it functions primarily as a pesky garnish that prevents the reader from eating Mones’s entree — like fighting through a thicket of parsley to savor the eight-treasure dongpo pork obscured beneath.
      add
  2. grands *
    • 2007 September 2, Holland Cotter, “On My Own Road”, New York Times:
      When I visited, they were sharing their house with Tessa’s two divorced sisters, a tiny, adored white dog and back-to-back twin baby grands.
      add
  3. kraft *
    • 2007 September 2, Stephen P. Williams, “About 100 Square Feet Per Person”, New York Times:
      Together, they papered half the bedroom in the kraft paper Ms. Hass uses in her current series called “Sides,” which focus on the ghostly outlines of Manhattan buildings that have been torn down.
      add