User:Visviva/NYT 20070923

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to: navigation, search
← Previous (2007-09-22) Words harvested from the New York Times, 2007-09-23
  • List status: open
→ Next (2007-09-24)

This is a list of lowercase non-hyphenated single words found in the 2007-09-23 issue of the New York Times which did not have English entries in the English Wiktionary when this list was created (2009-02-11).

[ see all NYT pages ] - [ see all tracking lists ]

181330 tokens ‧ 134205 valid lowercase tokens ‧ 13140 types ‧ 79 (~ 0.601%) words before cleaning ‧ 

2007-09-23[edit]

  1. antitax
    • 2007 September 23, Roger Lowenstein, “Deep Voodoo”, New York Times:
      The antitax crusader Grover Norquist spent a lot of time “working with the conservative press to make sure that we’re all thinking alike and talking alike.”
      add
  2. bizspeak
    • 2007 September 23, Kelley Holland, “In Mission Statements, Bizspeak and Bromides”, New York Times:
      Calls to nominate the worst mission statement appear periodically on the Web. And the “mission statement generator” at www.dilbert.com strings together clumps of bizspeak to create fictitious mission statements.
      add
  3. bushrangers
    • 2007 September 23, Carrie Hutchinson, “Design Within Reach”, New York Times:
      Redgum's pendant light takes its inspiration from a native tree; Kelly Gang coasters depict abstract images of the famous bushrangers. 155 Clarendon Street, South Melbourne; 011-61-3-9696-8445; www.melbournestyle.com.au .
      add
  4. chainwide
    • 2007 September 23, Charles Duhigg, “At Many Homes, More Profit and Less Nursing”, New York Times:
      But private investment companies have made it very difficult for plaintiffs to succeed in court and for regulators to levy chainwide fines by creating complex corporate structures that obscure who controls their nursing homes.
      add
  5. counterculturalism
    • 2007 September 23, Gerry Shanahan, “Next Stop, the West Village”, New York Times:
      It also falls to us Old Villagers to keep the neighborhood’s reputation alive, handing down the oral history so the Village will forever be remembered as the one true American artistic and intellectual bohemia, the place from which every American enlightenment sprung: Beatniks, sexual freedom, Abstract Expressionism, gay lib, women’s lib, folk music, counterculturalism and so on.
      add
  6. crawdaddies
    • 2007 September 23, Bob Brody, “In Harm’s Way”, New York Times:
      We had ordered something suitably Creole, blackened catfish or crawdaddies rémoulade or some such.
      add
  7. curbsides
    • 2007 September 23, Lawrence Ulrich, “They’re Electric, but Can They Be Fantastic?”, New York Times:
      Aside from home recharging, it would be easier to install pay-per-use outlets at curbsides and in parking lots than to spawn a network of hydrogen filling stations.
      add
  8. customizer
    • 2007 September 23, Jerry Garrett, “Making the World Safe for Velocity”, New York Times:
      Father Juliano declared bankruptcy after building only the prototype, but the car was restored a few years ago by a customizer in England.
      add
  9. cybergeeks
    • 2007 September 23, Matt Bai, “Profiting From the Pummeling”, New York Times:
      The underlying assumption reinforced by Republicans at every opportunity is simple and politically powerful: namely, that MoveOn and its 3.3 million members represent the ugliest and least mainstream of Democratic stereotypes, the kind of young and angry cybergeeks who shatter glass windows whenever the International Monetary Fund comes to town.
      add
  10. disserved
  11. ditziness
    • 2007 September 23, “Woman’s Studies”, New York Times:
      Why would you choose to advertise your lifelong fear of driving when it reinforces old stereotypes about female ineptitude and ditziness?
      add
  12. elderliness
    • 2007 September 23, Paul Berman, “Velvet Revolutionary”, New York Times:
      Saul Bellow wrote his last novel, “Ravelstein,” at age 84, and the book is a masterpiece, marred only by the fact that Bellow, in his elderliness, did keep on repeating himself — a lapse that Bellow’s editors could perhaps have prevented, if only they had summoned the courage to confront their author.
      add
  13. femto *
  14. fibrocystic
    • 2007 September 23, “Genetic Knowledge and Breast Cancer”, New York Times:
      I elected to have prophylactic mastectomies three years ago, after dealing with fibrocystic disease, numerous needle biopsies, annual ultrasound and mammography, two surgical biopsies — and constant worry and fear — for about 20 years.
      add
  15. flyout
  16. heartwrenching
  17. homicidally
    • 2007 September 23, Marilyn Stasio, “Death at the Races”, New York Times:
      And the two homicidally inclined tykes he hopes to train after he marries their unsuspecting mother have barely gotten around to stringing up a neighbor’s cat.
      add
  18. indiscussible
    • 2007 September 23, Leslie H. Gelb, “Dual Loyalties”, New York Times:
      It’s true, for instance, that the lobby has made America’s longstanding $3 billion annual aid program to Israel untouchable and indiscussible.
      add
  19. intellectuality
    • 2007 September 23, New York Times[1]:
      Mark Edmundson presents Freud’s arguments in “Moses and Monotheism” to mean that a combination of “an internal, invisible God” and “the mental labor of monotheism” is necessary for “a triumph of intellectuality over sensuality” and thereby for achievement in abstract areas of thought, including law, mathematics, science and literary art (Sept. 9).
      add
  20. intermedia *
    • 2007 September 23, The New York Times, “The Week Ahead: Sept. 23-29”, New York Times:
      On Saturday the Museum of Contemporary Art in Chicago will strike a similarly intermedia note, but in a completely different time, with "Sympathy for the Devil: Art and Rock 'n' Roll Since 1967."
      add
  21. kaffiya
    • 2007 September 23, Luke Jerod Kummer, “The Bench of Broken Dreams”, New York Times:
      Chelica, who for years fought depression, especially sought to befriend people with troubles of their own, among them a man whose attire has varied from women’s wear to a kaffiya and Roman sandals and who often carries a boom box while engaging in violent monologues that sometimes disintegrate into curses at pedestrians.
      add
  22. lispy
    • 2007 September 23, Cynthia Gorney, “How Do You Say ‘Got Milk’ en Español?”, New York Times:
      The office chatter eddies around the Gallegos workspace in Mexican Spanish, Argentine Spanish, Colombian Spanish, Puerto Rican Spanish, Cuban Spanish and the lispy Castillian Spanish of Spain, which is spoken fluently by, among others, a woman of Korean ancestry who grew up near Barcelona.
      add
  23. literalization
    • 2007 September 23, Dale Peck, “‘The Outsiders’: 40 Years Later”, New York Times:
      One suspects, however, that it was accidental here, or unconscious, just as it’s likely that Hinton’s echo of the testimonial frame Salinger used in “The Catcher in the Rye” (“If you really want to hear about it”) wasn’t consciously intended, nor was Hinton’s literalization of Holden’s “If a body catch a body coming through the rye” into the rescue of a group of children from a burning church.
      add
  24. mandoo
    • 2007 September 23, “A Year-Round Feast”, New York Times:
      The mandoo, pungent with pork and cabbage, are pan-fried, the skins barely crisp.
      add
  25. microchapter
    • 2007 September 23, Liesl Schillinger, “Books of Style”, New York Times:
      Byron’s letter appears in a microchapter about thank-you notes in the catch-all compendium “Everything but the Kitchen Sink: What Every Modern Woman Needs to Know,” compiled by the self-assured young British television personality Francesca Beauman.
      add
  26. midsentence
    • 2007 September 23, Cynthia Gorney, “How Do You Say ‘Got Milk’ en Español?”, New York Times:
      John Gallegos, who is 40, was born in Los Angeles to a family from the Mexican state of Zacatecas; he and the other United States-born Hispanics at the agency slide back and forth between languages, frequently midsentence.
      add
  27. minisuites
    • 2007 September 23, “The New New List”, New York Times:
      Jet Airways’ minisuites are especially swish.
      add
  28. multiresonant
    • 2007 September 23, The New York Times, “The Week Ahead: Sept. 23-29”, New York Times:
      Sunday brings the Hammer of Museum of Art's "Francis Alys: Politics of Rehearsal," the first large museum show in this country devoted to the multimedia, multiresonant work of this Belgian-born artist in Mexico City. Mr. Alys's efforts in video, painting, drawing and performance reveal an open-ended fusion of humor, poignancy and social commentary.
      add
  29. nanophysics
    • 2007 September 23, Jason Pontin, “In Tiny Particles, a Big Link in Jerusalem”, New York Times:
      The lab is the first nanotech center in East Jerusalem and the West Bank, according to Dr. Sowwan, a Palestinian who has a doctorate in solid-state nanophysics.
      add
  30. nanotechnologists
    • 2007 September 23, Jason Pontin, “In Tiny Particles, a Big Link in Jerusalem”, New York Times:
      By controlling matter at this size, nanotechnologists hope to fabricate devices and materials with novel, seemingly magical properties.
      add
  31. nestings
  32. outgoingness
    • 2007 September 23, Luke Jerod Kummer, “The Bench of Broken Dreams”, New York Times:
      Chelica often kept her problems well hidden beneath her outgoingness.
      add
  33. overstrenuous
    • 2007 September 23, Amanda Hesser, “1909: Eggs Eli”, New York Times:
      Among the story’s other overstrenuous tips for masking the flavor of eggs were poached eggs topped with a hops-scented béchamel, President Taft’s campfire omelet (fried trout, salt and pepper) and the Colony Club’s “Eggs Suffragette,” a twist on deviled eggs that incorporated anchovies (the dish, however, didn’t hasten women’s suffrage).
      add
  34. pathbreakers
    • 2007 September 23, Liesl Schillinger, “Notes on a Scandal”, New York Times:
      A century after pathbreakers like Emma Goldman, Charlotte Perkins Gilman and Ellen Key struggled to raise female consciousness, there is still no satisfactory answer to the question of how a woman dedicated to her own self-expression can fulfill the tradition-bound, justly demanding needs of her children when presented with a competitor for their love.
      add
  35. pedimented
    • 2007 September 23, Christopher Gray, “Kissing Cousins at 100: Only One Shows Its Age”, New York Times:
      Set on a high base, with rich marble trim, it has leaded-glass windows on either side of the door, and a sophisticated arch above the central second-floor window. Mr. Palliser gave the Brush house a complex massing, with a rounded extension on the left and pedimented gables.
      add
  36. portence
    • 2007 September 23, Alessandra Stanley, “You Are What You Watch”, New York Times:
      Others find that show’s aesthetic stinting and too trendy, and argue that the summer’s best new offering was instead “Damages,” the legal thriller with Glenn Close on FX. And even that show has caused rifts between those who live for Ms. Close’s “Devil Sues Prada” star turns and others who think its plot is too knotted up with wretched portence.
      add
  37. preapproved
  38. prescreened
    • 2007 September 23, Michelle Higgins, “Your Passport May Be in the Mail”, New York Times:
      The proposed rules require most of these travelers to show either valid American passports or approved passport alternatives like a $50 Nexus card, issued to prescreened travelers under a joint program operated by the United States and Canada.
      add
  39. remarketed
    • 2007 September 23, Roger Lowenstein, “Deep Voodoo”, New York Times:
      Then, when the surplus disappeared, they were remarketed as a stimulus measure.
      add
  40. reprioritization
    • 2007 September 23, Claudia La Rocco, “Mind and Body at Yale”, New York Times:
      In doing so, as Professor Roach noted during his lecture, they hope to effect an even greater change: “a reprioritization of the way knowledge is organized in the traditional curriculum.”
      add
  41. rollbars
    • 2007 September 23, Jerry Garrett, “Making the World Safe for Velocity”, New York Times:
      The Sir Vival also had a raised driver’s cabin with seat belts, a padded interior and built-in rollbars.
      add
  42. sarcophaguslike
    • 2007 September 23, Randy Kennedy, “The Duchamp of the Muscle Car”, New York Times:
      From the mail-order car hoods that he first started painting and hanging in the late 1980s to evoke Ad Reinhardt or Mark Rothko (“They were really minimal, and I don’t think anybody got them,” he said), Mr. Prince progressed to appropriating heftier chunks of automotive anatomy, making sarcophaguslike sculptures crowned with air scoops, usually left with the appearance of being only partly primed and spackled with body-shop Bondo compound.
      add
  43. scrappiness
    • 2007 September 23, Jessica Pressler, “The Bar Car Is Rocking”, New York Times:
      Philadelphians take pride in their city’s scrappiness, and locals had been suspicious about the renovation of the iconic diner.
      add
  44. semiautomated
    • 2007 September 23, George Johnson, “An Oracle for Our Time, Part Man, Part Machine”, New York Times:
      With enough computing power the monitoring could be semiautomated — scanning the database constantly and flagging suspicious edits for humans to inspect.
      add
  45. serrano *
    • 2007 September 23, Celia Barbour, “The Guilt of Having a Good Thing”, New York Times:
      He served figs and serrano ham, followed by slow-roasted mallards with wild rice.
      add
  46. shardlike
    • 2007 September 23, Carrie Hutchinson, “Design Within Reach”, New York Times:
      The design, by Lab Architecture Studio and Bates Smart, has shardlike clusters of buildings with fractal triangular designs on the facade in glass, zinc and sandstone.
      add
  47. skateless
    • 2007 September 23, Winter Miller, “Last Actress Standing”, New York Times:
      On a Wednesday night after a typical performance, featuring a flying Pegasus and a romance with a hunky mortal, Ms. Butler stood skateless (and leg-warmer-less) in a black strapless cocktail dress and black sandals that added two inches to her slight 5-foot-2 frame.
      add
  48. slatelike
    • 2007 September 23, Claire Wilson, “Is It a Bathtub, or Is It Sculpture?”, New York Times:
      Faucets and other chrome fixtures are mounted on gray synthetic slatelike panels that roll out of vertical cabinet doors and swivel for the best view.
      add
  49. softcover
    • 2007 September 23, The Editors, “Up Front”, New York Times:
      It gives more emphasis to the literary novels and short-story collections reviewed so often in our pages (and sometimes published only in softcover).
      add
  50. squawky
    • 2007 September 23, George Vecsey, “East Races Are as Different as N.L. and A.L.”, New York Times:
      This is the way we follow baseball races these days, not like in the old days when I was a kid, when one game arrived via a squawky radio with the other vital game clattering away in the background on a Western Union ticker.
      add
  51. stalwartness
    • 2007 September 23, “Woman’s Studies”, New York Times:
      Just because you are part of a social-justice movement, which is how I think of feminism, that doesn’t mean you are some brick wall of impermeable stalwartness in every area.
      add
  52. terrasse
    • 2007 September 23, Katie Roiphe, “Portrait of a Marriage”, New York Times:
      She is flirtatious, pleased with herself and given to exclaiming over the beauty of Paris and writing down everything she ate (‘a very chic sandwich with soft black bread and veal on the terrasse at Webers’).
      add
  53. torchings
    • 2007 September 23, David Bowman, “Torchlit Crit”, New York Times:
      His attempt to find the real arsonist leads him to wonder if one of his newly alcoholic parents could have committed the torchings.
      add
  54. trafficky
    • 2007 September 23, Elizabeth Giddens, “Parks on a Lark”, New York Times:
      In addition to the charming incongruity of lush grass and lounge chairs amid the trafficky chaos of New York’s streetscape, the event, which is sponsored by the Trust for Public Land , provoked animated discussions about land use.
      add
  55. underbuilt
  56. understaffing
    • 2007 September 23, Charles Duhigg, “At Many Homes, More Profit and Less Nursing”, New York Times:
      In the past, residents’ families often responded to such declines in care by suing, and regulators levied heavy fines against nursing home chains where understaffing led to lapses in care.
      add
  57. unitized
    • 2007 September 23, Jerry Garrett, “Making the World Safe for Velocity”, New York Times:
      Structural advances continued through the ’30s as the conventional ladder frame gave way to unitized construction of the body shell.
      add
  58. untinted
  59. woohooed
  60. zierfandler
    • 2007 September 23, Howard G. Goldberg, “For Post-Spa or Pre-Meal”, New York Times:
      The Classic may create interest in Stadlmann’s pricier and more complex Mandelhöh vineyard zierfandler, which surpasses many Burgundies.
      add

Sequestered[edit]

  1. cupcakistas
  2. neighborhooods = neighborhoods
    • 2007 September 23, Elsa Brenner, “A Visit to the Commuting Far Reaches”, New York Times:
      There are numerous historic districts — not only whole neighborhooods but also dozens of sites, among them public buildings and private homes.
      add