User:Visviva/NYT 20071012

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This is a list of lowercase non-hyphenated single words found in the 2007-10-12 issue of the New York Times which did not have English entries in the English Wiktionary when this list was created (2009-02-11).

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97633 tokens ‧ 71807 valid lowercase tokens ‧ 8908 types ‧ 29 (~ 0.326%) words before cleaning ‧ 

2007-10-12[edit]

  1. baile *
    • 2007 October 12, Ben Ratliff, “Those About to Rock and Jam and Sample and Rap and Rant and ...”, New York Times:
      M.I.A. Hip-hop electro, Jamaican dancehall, Brazilian baile funk, South Asian bhangra — Maya Arulpragasam, better known as M.I.A., draws on all of them in sparse, noisy, low-fi groove tracks that sound like they come from some imagined third world street.
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  2. blowsiness
    • 2007 October 12, Allan Kozinn, “With Tchaikovsky Down Memory Lane”, New York Times:
      Here power gave way to blowsiness; the sudden explosions of brass choir dominance seemed a cheap effect, a way to counterfeit excitement. Mr. Maazel relies on this kind of passion substitute — others include mannered volume and tempo manipulation — the way the fast-food industry relies on chemicals to approximate natural flavors.
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  3. demandingly
    • 2007 October 12, Alessandra Stanley, “Homicide and Heels”, New York Times:
      “Have you called him back?” she asks demandingly.
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  4. doodlish
    • 2007 October 12, Holland Cotter, “Black and White, but Never Simple”, New York Times:
      Whether in large cutouts, or notebook-size drawings, or in films that are basically animated versions of both, her draftsmanship is excitingly textured — old-masterish here, doodlish there — and all of a piece.
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  5. fluffily
    • 2007 October 12, Alessandra Stanley, “Homicide and Heels”, New York Times:
      As Lindsay Boxer, a homicide investigator in San Francisco, Angie Harmon (“Law & Order”) has an almost campy ’70s look: her hair is long and fluffily layered, and when she stalks a suspect, gun up, crouching on stiletto-heeled boots, ’70s-style syncopated music plays in the background.
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  6. fremesis
    • 2007 October 12, Alessandra Stanley, “Homicide and Heels”, New York Times:
      The new “Bionic Woman,” on NBC, adds a fembot friend, an early bionic prototype with a few unfortunate kinks to her $6 million body who is Jaime’s alter ego and also her nemesis, a fremesis.
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  7. guitarlike
  8. hypercharged
    • 2007 October 12, Anthony Tommasini, “An Ensemble Chooses Well in Programs, Not in Name”, New York Times:
      This hypercharged work evokes the textures, colorings and character of Polish folk music, but not, as Mr. Bruce told the audience, actual folk tunes.
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  9. interpretively
  10. manurey
    • 2007 October 12, Robin Finn, “Jumping Toward Her Own Turn in the Spotlight”, New York Times:
      “I was never competitive in the girly sense; I was a tomboy, on all the sports teams, and I started riding at 3 and kept on riding whatever pony my sister grew out of,” she says, trying to wrestle the muddy, possibly manurey football she found in her bed from the jaws of her bull terrier, Mabel.
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  11. multiday
    • 2007 October 12, Amy Gunderson, “House-Hunting as Vacation”, New York Times:
      Prices vary, but start at $125 a person for multiday trips that include accommodations, transportation in the country and meals.
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  12. nonenergy
  13. nonhierarchical
    • 2007 October 12, Ken Johnson, “From Tibet, Art of Enlightenment”, New York Times:
      One set of paintings from the 18th or 19th centuries is unusually marked by nonsymmetrical, nonhierarchical compositions.
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  14. nonsymmetrical
    • 2007 October 12, Ken Johnson, “From Tibet, Art of Enlightenment”, New York Times:
      One set of paintings from the 18th or 19th centuries is unusually marked by nonsymmetrical, nonhierarchical compositions.
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  15. nonurban
  16. overexpanded
    • 2007 October 12, Paul Krugman, “Sliming Graeme Frost”, New York Times:
      The New York Times reported that Republicans in Congress “were gearing up to use Graeme as evidence that Democrats have overexpanded the health program to include families wealthy enough to afford private insurance” but had “backed off” as the case fell apart.
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  17. remanufacturing
    • 2007 October 12, Nick Bunkley, “Ford Hires Head of Lexus, Aiming for Toyota Magic”, New York Times:
      He drove the car — without a license or his parents’ knowledge — from California, where he had a summer job at a Ford remanufacturing plant, to Michigan, where his family lived.
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  18. rivalrous
    • 2007 October 12, Stephen Holden, “At New York Film Festival: Upheaval in Iran, Fiasco in Westchester”, New York Times:
      In “Before the Devil Knows You’re Dead,” Mr. Lumet’s 45th film, Philip Seymour Hoffman and Ethan Hawke play rivalrous brothers whose bungled robbery of their parents’ modest jewelry store in Westchester County begins a cycle of quasi-Greek family tragedy without a catharsis.
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  19. rodding
  20. sapelle *
  21. shunga
    • 2007 October 12, Roberta Smith, “Art in Review”, New York Times:
      The works confound stereotypes of Japanese etiquette, even as they update the tradition of the anatomically explicit shunga print.
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  22. stereoviews
  23. stockholdings
  24. superyacht
    • 2007 October 12, Anthony Ramirez, “Dealers Go Sailing, Sale-ing on a Floating Art Gallery”, New York Times:
      True, he does own a yacht, a $40 million pleasure craft that would beggar the Disco Volante, the superyacht used for evil by the one-eyed Emilio Largo in the 1965 Bond film “Thunderball.”
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  25. tabloidized
    • 2007 October 12, Robin Finn, “Jumping Toward Her Own Turn in the Spotlight”, New York Times:
      Make the strategic mistake — toward the end of a pleasantly blunt chat conducted while traipsing around her farm and ogling its stellar inhabitants — of mentioning her tabloidized romance with Cian O’Connor, a garrulous Irish horseman who forfeited an Olympic gold medal in 2005 when his mount failed a drug test, and she instinctively puts on the verbal brakes.
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  26. tapestrylike
    • 2007 October 12, Ken Johnson, “From Tibet, Art of Enlightenment”, New York Times:
      The tapestrylike pictures have a sweetly personal poetry unlike the more anonymously stylized look of the exhibition’s other works.
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  27. tourgoers
    • 2007 October 12, Amy Gunderson, “House-Hunting as Vacation”, New York Times:
      While Mr. Burke readily tells tourgoers that he earns a fee if they buy a property (it’s not unusual for a tour participant to spend $350,000 on a condo), he said “there is no sales pressure.”
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  28. wheatstacks
    • 2007 October 12, Karen Rosenberg, “Paint It Once, Paint It Twice, Paint It Once Again”, New York Times:
      The wheatstacks have also inspired one of this show’s mildly irritating interactive components: a digital gallery inviting viewers to design their own exhibitions of the series.
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  29. yucks
    • 2007 October 12, Stephen Holden, “At New York Film Festival: Upheaval in Iran, Fiasco in Westchester”, New York Times:
      Laugh-out-loud humor is a scarce commodity at any film festival, but there are yucks galore in “Mr. Warmth: The Don Rickles Project,” John Landis ’s documentary portrait of the beloved insult comic. Mr. Rickles, at 81, still exhibits the ferocity of a mad bull, although beneath his belligerence is a sentimental family man.
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Sequestered[edit]