User:Visviva/NYT 20071021

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This is a list of lowercase non-hyphenated single words found in the 2007-10-21 issue of the New York Times which did not have English entries in the English Wiktionary when this list was created (2009-02-26).

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190347 tokens ‧ 139845 valid lowercase tokens ‧ 13705 types ‧ 87 (~ 0.635%) words before cleaning ‧ 

2007-10-21[edit]

  1. boutiquelike
    • 2007 October 21, Claire Wilson, “Breakfast on Wall St., Anyone?”, New York Times:
      The boutiquelike areas extend beyond the main selling area to other corners of the store.
      add
  2. castoreum
    • 2007 October 21, Chandler Burr, “What the Cat Dragged In”, New York Times:
      fueling Ravageur with a little synthetic civet, a lot of synthetic castoreum (un castor is a beaver) and a synthetic musk base.
      add
  3. civetlike
    • 2007 October 21, Chandler Burr, “Meow Mix”, New York Times:
      The French can tolerate civetlike scents by the gallon.
      add
  4. commanderess
    • 2007 October 21, Maureen Dowd, “Cougars, Archers, Snipers”, New York Times:
      Her political hucksters and Power Pointers are trying to help the New York senator blur the line between “male” and “female” enough to become the first commanderess in chief.
      add
  5. crackerbox
    • 2007 October 21, Lawrence Ulrich, “Attractive, Yes, if Not for Its Looks”, New York Times:
      It’s the same with the Subaru Impreza WRX. With apologies to its zealous owners — their vision was apparently too clouded by speed to notice — the original WRX was one of the homeliest cars around, a budget crackerbox in a high-performance Halloween costume.
      add
  6. craggers
    • 2007 October 21, James Kanter, “Members of New Group in Britain Aim to Offset Their Own Carbon Output”, New York Times:
      Like-minded groups are slowly springing up across Britain , with about 160 people active in some 20 CRAGs. While that is not a large number, the craggers, as they are known, are an example of how the phenomenon of low-carbon living is spreading in Britain, where politicians, companies and communities are competing to be the greenest.
      add
  7. cupless
    • 2007 October 21, Alex Kuczynski, “Coming Up Clover”, New York Times:
      Inside, past the maze of mannequins, Lido dancers, flown in from Paris for the occasion, can-canned across the stage, diamond collars around their throats, their breasts held nakedly aloft in glittering, cupless brassieres.
      add
  8. damasked
    • 2007 October 21, Christopher Gray, “When a Sixth Avenue Flagship Struck Its Colors”, New York Times:
      The Daily Graphic described the “thousands of ladies, who swarmed like bees over the three first floors” on opening day, saying that the staff had “all they could do taking orders for hunting suits, for grenadine dresses with damasked polonaise and trimming of white and black French lace, and for the pretty morning dresses.”
      add
  9. darnation
    • 2007 October 21, “A Great New Yark, if They Get It Done; Flying Everyone Home for the Holidays; Those L.I.R.R. Horns: We’ve Had Enough!; Exxon Mobil and Newtown Creek (4 Letters)”, New York Times:
      “ ‘New Yark,’ said Jonathan one day, as he picked his way among paving stones, and sand banks, and heaps of bricks which were thrown upon Broadway by the gas-works, and water works companies, and those who were pulling down and building houses — ‘New Yark,’ said he, and at this moment he tumbled over a bundle of slate lying directly in his way, capsized a lady, and singed his bran new knapt hat in the fire where the working men were melting lead, but picked himself up with a simple exclamation of ‘Gall darn it’ — ‘New Yark,’ said he — and Jonathan was a frequent visitor to sell his onions and wooden dishes — ‘would be a darnation fine place, if they ever got it done.’ ”
      add
  10. depetaled
    • 2007 October 21, Amy Serafin, “The Louvre Now Accepts the Living”, New York Times:
      Across from it is “Danaë,” in which a giant blackened depetaled sunflower emerges from a pile of lead books.
      add
  11. dermabrasion
    • 2007 October 21, Lawrence Ulrich, “Attractive, Yes, if Not for Its Looks”, New York Times:
      Even so, you would never fiddle with the Mona Lisa’s looks, never send her out for a whiter smile and some dermabrasion.
      add
dinosaurlike
    • 2007 October 21, Christopher Gray, “When a Sixth Avenue Flagship Struck Its Colors”, New York Times:
      The old B. Altman store and the retail buildings were taken over for lofts or other miscellaneous uses, and until the 1980s this section of Sixth Avenue was like a La Brea Tar Pit of retail architecture, with its huge dinosaurlike buildings mired in neglect.
      add
  1. dockmasters
    • 2007 October 21, Jennifer Bleyer, “Stray Sailboats, and Worries Ashore”, New York Times:
      Some neighbors came to the conclusion that the boats were anchored illegally and consulted with the dockmasters unit of the city’s Department of Small Business Services, the agency responsible for waterfront patrol and enforcement.
      add
  2. druglike
  3. fabulations
    • 2007 October 21, Tom Carson, “Guy Gone Wild”, New York Times:
      Wilson is impressively if inexplicably determined to uncover the reality behind Robbins’s fabulations about his early years, some of which proved sturdy enough to show up in his obituaries.
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  4. fetishistically
    • 2007 October 21, Michael Brick, “The Mafia, an F.B.I. Agent and Murder: Mr. Scorsese, Your Next Film Awaits”, New York Times:
      Fortunately, their nicknames give them away: All are figures associated with the Mafia, that fetishistically documented secret society responsible for long-ago crime waves, more recent cinematic masterpieces and, above all, an enduring modern marketing bonanza.
      add
  5. flanken
    • 2007 October 21, Alex Witchel, “A Counter History”, New York Times:
      But for aficionados of the real thing, the high-quality, old-school kosher renditions of brisket or flanken or center-cut tongue like silk, the Second Avenue Deli was it.
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  6. fuguelike
    • 2007 October 21, Field Maloney, “Here in Dinkytown”, New York Times:
      Ultimately, Furst suggests that each generation is condemned to live out its parents’ unresolved stories, over and over, fuguelike.
      add
  7. giggliness
    • 2007 October 21, Luc Sante, “The Big Reveal”, New York Times:
      The flip side to that sort of hysteria is a pervasive Beavis-and-Butt-Head giggliness about the body.
      add
  8. grenache
    • 2007 October 21, Howard G. Goldberg, “3-Grape Blend With Charm”, New York Times:
      Mr. Autard’s charming 2006 Côtes du Rhône, a blend made from grenache, syrah and mourvèdre grapes, is juicy and slightly rustic.
      add
  9. grouplet
    • 2007 October 21, Bharat Mediratta; As Told To Julie Bick, “The Google Way: Give Engineers Room”, New York Times:
      To help deal with that, a number of grouplet organizers meet once a week to make sure they are not at cross-purposes.
      add
  10. grouplets
    • 2007 October 21, Bharat Mediratta; As Told To Julie Bick, “The Google Way: Give Engineers Room”, New York Times:
      OF course, the grouplets need guidance to make sure they are aligned with the company interest.
      add
  11. hexenyl
    • 2007 October 21, Chandler Burr, “Meow Mix”, New York Times:
      We were there to study raw materials: Bulgarian rose, incense and synthetics like cis-3 hexenyl salicyate, which smells like freshly cut grass.
      add
  12. horas *
  13. horning
  14. janisars
    • 2007 October 21, Carlotta Gall, “Hospitals Full of Victims and Solidarity With Bhutto”, New York Times:
      Another of the janisars, who gave his name as Sherbaz, 27, kissed the picture of Ms. Bhutto’s father, Zulfikar Ali Bhutto, the founder of the Pakistan Peoples Party who was executed by Gen. Muhammad Zia ul-Haq in 1979, on an identity card hanging round his neck.
      add
  15. knapt
    • 2007 October 21, “A Great New Yark, if They Get It Done; Flying Everyone Home for the Holidays; Those L.I.R.R. Horns: We’ve Had Enough!; Exxon Mobil and Newtown Creek (4 Letters)”, New York Times:
      “ ‘New Yark,’ said Jonathan one day, as he picked his way among paving stones, and sand banks, and heaps of bricks which were thrown upon Broadway by the gas-works, and water works companies, and those who were pulling down and building houses — ‘New Yark,’ said he, and at this moment he tumbled over a bundle of slate lying directly in his way, capsized a lady, and singed his bran new knapt hat in the fire where the working men were melting lead, but picked himself up with a simple exclamation of ‘Gall darn it’ — ‘New Yark,’ said he — and Jonathan was a frequent visitor to sell his onions and wooden dishes — ‘would be a darnation fine place, if they ever got it done.’ ”
      add
  16. macrotrend
    • 2007 October 21, Maureen Dowd, “Cougars, Archers, Snipers”, New York Times:
      That would be corporate marketers and Hillary Marketers (more of a macrotrend).
      add
  17. megawealth
    • 2007 October 21, David M. Kennedy, “Malefactors of Megawealth”, New York Times:
      In our time, Krugman argues, the malefactors of megawealth have triumphed.
      add
  18. meliorator
    • 2007 October 21, Harry Hurt Iii, “A Lens on Wealth, From All the Angles”, New York Times:
      Who can fault Ralph Waldo Emerson for observing that “the greatest meliorator of the world is selfish, huckstering trade?”
      add
  19. microconstituencies
    • 2007 October 21, Maureen Dowd, “Cougars, Archers, Snipers”, New York Times:
      Why rely on a candidate’s charisma and beliefs if you can break down the country into microconstituencies — from Archery Moms to Surgery Lovers to Uptown Tattooed — and then devise policies to appeal to them?
      add
  20. microeconomy
    • 2007 October 21, Adam Hochschild, “Voyage of the Damned”, New York Times:
      Rediker looks not at that bigger picture but at the slave ship itself, as a microeconomy where the captain was chief executive, jailer, accountant, paymaster and disciplinarian, exercising these roles by maintaining, from his spacious captain’s cabin in a very unspacious ship, the mystique of what later military leaders would call command isolation.
      add
  21. microportals
    • 2007 October 21, Virginia Heffernan, “The Pleasure of Rabbit Holes”, New York Times:
      These rabbit holes — the kind Alice fell down, the kind that tempt Neo in “The Matrix” — provide microportals into what can only be described as new worlds.
      add
  22. microtrend
  23. monsignors
  24. multiplicious
    • 2007 October 21, Elsa Dixler, “Paperback Row”, New York Times:
      Some of them are polemical, our reviewer, Joel Brouwer, said, but “Reed’s best poems conjure up a vertiginous, multiplicious, irresolvable and thrilling world.”
      add
  25. narcotized
    • 2007 October 21, Luc Sante, “The Big Reveal”, New York Times:
      You have your classic Edward Weston-style nudes, your darkly brooding Nan Goldin-style nudes, your provocative and slightly grotesque Helmut Newton-style nudes, and, well, your creamy, dewy, sun-dappled, narcotized David Hamilton-style nudes.
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  26. ngoni
    • 2007 October 21, Kelefa Sanneh, “Under the Hook, Rap and Rhythm Lie the Beats”, New York Times:
      Mr. Kouyate’s instrument is the four-stringed West African ngoni, also called a xalam; his résumé includes appearances on recent albums by his fellow Malians Toumani Diabaté and Ali Farka Touré.
      add
  27. nonquitters
    • 2007 October 21, “Revolutionary Spirit”, New York Times:
      In the end, there will be just one country left that allows smoking, for all the nonquitters in the world.
      add
  28. nonworkaholic
    • 2007 October 21, Phyllis Korkki, “When Hard Work Becomes Overwork”, New York Times:
      A. The nonworkaholic knows how to set boundaries. Ms. Fassel said: “Many of us at various times in our life have to work very long hours, but we have the internal regulator that says, ‘This has gone on long enough.’”
      add
  29. noteless
    • 2007 October 21, Alex Witchel, “A Counter History”, New York Times:
      When it was Lebewohl’s turn, he got up, noteless, and looked at the audience.
      add
  30. overlegalization
    • 2007 October 21, Steven Erlanger, “Investigations Test Olmert’s Power”, New York Times:
      “The ability of governments to govern is being compromised by the overlegalization of Israeli society,” said Gidi Grinstein, who runs an independent research center, the Reut Institute.
      add
  31. pizzetta *
    • 2007 October 21, Patricia Leigh Brown, “A New Lease on Lunch”, New York Times:
      In the restaurant’s warm Arts and Crafts glow, the dishes arrived one after another: pizzetta with chanterelle mushrooms and gremolata (thumbs up); Marin Sun Farm marrow bones roasted in the wood oven with herb salad (thumbs down).
      add
  32. playsheet
    • 2007 October 21, New York Times[1]:
      Seahawks Coach Mike Holmgren was not happy when NBC showed a close-up of his playsheet during last week’s loss to the Saints , but it was probably time for a new one — the Seahawks (3-3) have scored only 17 points in their past two games.
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  33. publishee
    • 2007 October 21, Tom Carson, “Guy Gone Wild”, New York Times:
      Wonder of wonders, Robbins’s first publisher was Alfred A. Knopf, and the publishee liked to boast that he was one of only three authors with a “lifetime” Knopf contract.
      add
  34. puerilely
    • 2007 October 21, Lee Siegel, “Mom’s in the Freezer”, New York Times:
      If you find the idea that mothers shape their children’s “whole” lives original rather than simultaneously banal and puerilely overstated, then Barnes & Noble, here you come!
      add
  35. rekick
  36. selfappointed
    • 2007 October 21, John Kifner, David Rohde, Bill Marsh And Renee Rigdon, “Sorting Out Pakistan’s Many Struggles”, New York Times:
      Indeed, the return of former Prime Minister Benazir Bhutto last week to join an uneasy coalition with the selfappointed president, Gen. Pervez Musharraf, was a product of a struggle between civilian and military authority that has defined the country’s politics.
      add
  37. skyful
    • 2007 October 21, Choe Sang-Hun, “In Myanmar, Fear Is Ever Present”, New York Times:
      But each day, across the nation, it organized rallies attended by thousands of people holding signs that condemned “external interference” and accused the BBC, the Voice of America and Radio Free Asia of “airing a skyful of lies.”
      add
  38. subminister
    • 2007 October 21, Elaine Sciolino, “L’Amour Has Little to Do With l’État”, New York Times:
      His subminister of foreign affairs and human rights is 31 years old and Senegalese-born; Mr. Sarkozy refers to her as his “Condi Rice.”
      add
  39. supercompressed
    • 2007 October 21, Kelefa Sanneh, “Under the Hook, Rap and Rhythm Lie the Beats”, New York Times:
      The song was produced by the pop scientist Dr. Luke, who somehow combines indie-rock and progressive house into three and a half supercompressed minutes.
      add
  40. supersite
    • 2007 October 21, Virginia Heffernan, “The Pleasure of Rabbit Holes”, New York Times:
      This and more far-fetched Italian culinary insight from the top chef Batali, who — you heard it here first — introduces a video series of tall tales and cooking demos on the gastronomic supersite Serious Eats .
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  41. suribachi
    • 2007 October 21, Patricia Leigh Brown, “A New Lease on Lunch”, New York Times:
      She insisted that all we needed were a few simple tools: a large metal spatula; a cast-iron skillet; a toaster oven, her favorite appliance because it fosters small-scale cooking; and a Japanese suribachi, a ceramic mortar that is the perfect size for making vinaigrette.
      add
  42. tooken
  43. toylike
    • 2007 October 21, Rob Walker, “The Cult of Gocco”, New York Times:
      Certainly artists have been attracted to arcane or toylike tools before, but previous examples — like the Diana camera from the ’60s or Pixelvision camcorders from the ’80s — appealed in part because the results looked markedly different.
      add
  44. trucklets
    • 2007 October 21, Ezra Dyer, “An Exotic Just Out of Reach”, New York Times:
      The take-home message is this: because we cannot buy V-12 diesel Audis or Pagani Zondas or those El Camino-looking trucklets favored by Australians, we Americans are sadly bereft of choice when it comes to cars.
      add
  45. twistedly
    • 2007 October 21, Virginia Heffernan, “The Pleasure of Rabbit Holes”, New York Times:
      She plays it on an iPod and blasts his twistedly perfect English accent while she’s planting tomatoes.
      add
  46. unhittable
  47. unmassaged
    • 2007 October 21, Liesl Schillinger, “True Believers”, New York Times:
      But Perrotta’s unmassaged realism runs through all of his writing — from “Bad Haircut: Stories of the Seventies,” a coming-of-age collection so alive in detail that you can practically touch the tube socks and pastel tuxes; to his first novel, “The Wishbones,” about a small-time rocker with wedding jitters; to “Joe College,” a novel about a working-class kid from Jersey who reinvents himself at Yale, callously breaking ties with his girlfriend back home.
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  48. unmooring
    • 2007 October 21, Field Maloney, “Here in Dinkytown”, New York Times:
      She feels the same way about Trent, for whom she develops a ferocious, unmooring love.
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  49. unscrutinized
    • 2007 October 21, Tim Golden, “Naming Names at Gitmo”, New York Times:
      He also hoped the lipstick-red envelope might pass unscrutinized through the Guantánamo post office.
      add
  50. unspacious
    • 2007 October 21, Adam Hochschild, “Voyage of the Damned”, New York Times:
      Rediker looks not at that bigger picture but at the slave ship itself, as a microeconomy where the captain was chief executive, jailer, accountant, paymaster and disciplinarian, exercising these roles by maintaining, from his spacious captain’s cabin in a very unspacious ship, the mystique of what later military leaders would call command isolation.
      add
  51. unwove
  52. upstretched
    • 2007 October 21, Alexis Wolff, “Too Bad for Me That She Was So Well Loved”, New York Times:
      I would grab her upstretched arms and swing her onto my hip, and we would walk around the neighborhood until we found something to do.
      add
  53. wherefores
    • 2007 October 21, Daphne Merkin, “Speak No ‘Evil’”, New York Times:
      Like Maria Wyeth, the jaded narrator of Joan Didion ’s permanently contemporary novel, “Play It as It Lays” (published in 1970), we are too weary — or leery — to parse out the whys and wherefores of even Shakespearean villains: “What makes Iago evil? some people ask,” goes the opening sentence.
      add
  54. xalam
    • 2007 October 21, Kelefa Sanneh, “Under the Hook, Rap and Rhythm Lie the Beats”, New York Times:
      Mr. Kouyate’s instrument is the four-stringed West African ngoni, also called a xalam; his résumé includes appearances on recent albums by his fellow Malians Toumani Diabaté and Ali Farka Touré.
      add
  55. zizits
    • 2007 October 21, Benjamin Anastas, “Painfully Religious”, New York Times:
      After discovering as a rebellious teenager that a yarmulke and zizits are a license to shoplift, Auslander is shipped off by his parents to a yeshiva for wayward teenagers in Israel, where he meets a girl and even reconnects with God for a time.
      add

Sequestered[edit]

  1. chauffered = chauffeured
    • 2007 October 21, “Cleanup Acts”, New York Times:
      Get-out-of-jail pass: A chauffered Porsche Cayenne will take you on day trips.
      add
  2. starushka
    • 2007 October 21, Maud Newton, “Mysteries of Pittsburgh”, New York Times:
      A light-footed young wife falls for a man who encourages her to take ballet classes, but she stays with the husband who has nicknamed her starushka (“little old lady”).
      add