User:Visviva/NYT 20071028

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This is a list of lowercase non-hyphenated single words found in the 2007-10-28 issue of the New York Times which did not have English entries in the English Wiktionary when this list was created (2009-02-26).

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203581 tokens ‧ 150786 valid lowercase tokens ‧ 14281 types ‧ 101 (~ 0.707%) words before cleaning ‧ 

2007-10-28[edit]

  1. antibleeding
    • 2007 October 28, Pauline W. Chen, “Heart and Soul”, New York Times:
      His chapter on the controversies surrounding aprotinin, an antibleeding agent often used in cardiac surgery, is particularly impressive.
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  2. antigrowth
    • 2007 October 28, Michelle ODonnell, “In the Ashes, Californians Ask How to Defeat the Santa Anas”, New York Times:
      Despite the dangers of living in a fire-prone arid basin, developers and home buyers have rarely been deterred, and they are not likely to be in the future, even with the states well-organized antigrowth forces.
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  3. archresistance
    • 2007 October 28, Somini Sengupta, “A Tale of Tragic Love Cracks Calcuttas Mirror”, New York Times:
      For over a month, Calcutta has been gripped by the story of Rizwanur Rahman and Priyanka Todi: he a young, striving Muslim, she a fabulously wealthy Hindu, both daring to marry despite her familys archresistance and, in the end, paying a terrible price.
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  4. auslanders
    • 2007 October 28, George Vecsey, “Sun Never Sets on English Premier League”, New York Times:
      That is a lot of nationalities to be throwing around in one paragraph, particularly on the day before another swarm of auslanders, the oversized marauders from the National Football League, do their mysterious thing at Wembley.
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  5. beadlike
    • 2007 October 28, Ellen Pall, “Meet the Neighbors”, New York Times:
      People call them Eves necklace, she said, because of the beadlike quality of the hanging seeds.
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  6. bounceback
  7. boxload
    • 2007 October 28, Charles Mcgrath, “I, Editor Author”, New York Times:
      TOO MUCH Thomas Wolfe wrote by the boxload.
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  8. cantilevering
    • 2007 October 28, Nicolai Ouroussoff, “Where Gods Yearn for Long-Lost Treasures”, New York Times:
      Just above, the museums top floor seems to shift slightly, its corners cantilevering over the edge of the story below as if it is sliding off the top of the building.
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  9. cholo *
    • 2007 October 28, Guy Trebay, “Shes Famous (and So Can You)”, New York Times:
      Her family emigrated from postwar Vietnam to Singapore and later moved to Houston, where they lived in public housing and where, as she once said in an interview with Import Tuner, a car magazine, she became deeply disoriented about her identity: I was really confused then, because at first I thought I was black, then I thought I was Hispanic and joined a cholo gang.
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  10. defensibility
    • 2007 October 28, A. O. Scott, “A War on Every Screen”, New York Times:
      In Rendition a high-ranking C.I.A. official played by Meryl Streep lectures a young Senate aide on the strategic necessity and moral defensibility of secret prisons and harsh interrogation methods.
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  11. discriminantly
    • 2007 October 28, Richard Ford, “The Noise Is Killing Me”, New York Times:
      And when you start thinking of sports that way, as being about anything that fits or just anything instead of being about a game played on a field someplace, thats when its easy to start thinking of other things less discriminantly: of sports as an arm of the entertainment industry, of the field or the court or the ice as a stage, of sports media as interactive theater, or Grand Guignol, or commedia dellarte, of Tom Arnold and the supremely awful Dennis Miller as being interesting sports personalities.
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  12. dockmasters
    • 2007 October 28, Alex Mindlin, “Where Boats Go Quietly into the Good Night”, New York Times:
      The department, which oversees the citys dockmasters, has encouraged residents to call 311 with the locations of any wrecks they see.
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  13. doorstopper
    • 2007 October 28, Charles Mcgrath, “I, Editor Author”, New York Times:
      Its also hundreds of pages shorter than the Knopf doorstopper, which may recommend it to slackers as well as to Tolstoyans.
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  14. drunkalogue
    • 2007 October 28, Stephen King, “Slowhand”, New York Times:
      This qualification is more commonly known in the program as the drunkalogue.
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  15. drunkalogues
    • 2007 October 28, Stephen King, “Slowhand”, New York Times:
      In drunkalogues, the final part of the tale what its like now is usually the most rewarding to live and the least interesting to listen to; veteran drunks have heard it all before, and the newbies, shaking and pale, rarely believe it (I myself believed that anyone claiming more than four months of continuous sobriety had to be flat lying).
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  16. emblematically
    • 2007 October 28, Geoff Dyer, “Centurys Playlist”, New York Times:
      Inevitably Dmitri Shostakovich is the emblematically contorted figure, moving from derisory laughter at the very idea of having to explain the socioeconomic dimensions of the music of Chopin and Liszt to an uncomfortable accommodation with the state that both facilitates and threatens his work.
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  17. exoticisms
    • 2007 October 28, Pankaj Mishra, “Favorite Things”, New York Times:
      Jazzs turn to the avant-garde and the exoticisms of the 1960s now seems as inevitable as the rise of atonal classical music after the breakup of the stable societies of 19th-century Europe.
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  18. factless
    • 2007 October 28, Richard Ford, “The Noise Is Killing Me”, New York Times:
      But sports, at least as we get it piped into our homes now, sports as the entertainment industry, sports as maundering gossip, sports as smirking, factless triviality for the bored, may in fact be a symptom of something grave about us, the sporting consumers.
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  19. focusless
    • 2007 October 28, Richard Ford, “The Noise Is Killing Me”, New York Times:
      Much sportswriting (a job I used to have), much thats on ESPN, lots thats on Sporting News Radio and The Best Damn Sports whatever and in The New York Times in other words, a great deal of my Dimension Two is trying to sharpen the focus on a bunch of focusless stuff that not only doesnt matter a toot, and could never be proven true or false and therefore isnt really journalism, but that also doesnt have anything to do with the game as its played.
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  20. foldover
    • 2007 October 28, Rob Walker, “Timeless Object”, New York Times:
      Or the Timeless Bracelet, designed by Ina Seifart: a link-style watchband with a traditional foldover clasp, it has no face at all, just an open spot where you would expect to see one.
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  21. fritted
    • 2007 October 28, Nicolai Ouroussoff, “Where Gods Yearn for Long-Lost Treasures”, New York Times:
      Sunlight spills down through a concrete-and-glass grid several stories above; the floor of the ramp is a grid with fritted glass panels that allow additional glimpses of the subterranean ruins.
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  22. gullwing
    • 2007 October 28, Dave Kinney, “Making a Fortune Small in Collector Cars”, New York Times:
      1981-82 DELOREAN DMC-12 With its stainless-steel skin and gullwing doors, the DeLorean looked flashy, but performance from the rear-mounted V-6 engine fell short of the appearance.
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  23. hearingly
    • 2007 October 28, Geoff Dyer, “Centurys Playlist”, New York Times:
      Ross enables us to listen more hearingly.
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  24. heliboarding
  25. hokeypokey
  26. hypercorrecting
    • 2007 October 28, William Safire, “And Now This”, New York Times:
      I use reduplicate to mean redouble, though both words should mean quadruple, but English is funny that way, so hold off on the hypercorrecting gotcha!
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  27. immatured
    • 2007 October 28, The Editors, “Up Front”, New York Times:
      Musically, Dyer said, my taste immatured with age: in my late 30s I emigrated from jazz to house, techno and psy trance.
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  28. interspinalis
    • 2007 October 28, Gretchen Reynolds, “Twist and Ouch”, New York Times:
      So are the less familiar intertransversi, interspinalis and multifidus muscles, which link to the larger abdominal group but which rarely figure in magazine articles about washboard abs.
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  29. intertransversi
    • 2007 October 28, Gretchen Reynolds, “Twist and Ouch”, New York Times:
      So are the less familiar intertransversi, interspinalis and multifidus muscles, which link to the larger abdominal group but which rarely figure in magazine articles about washboard abs.
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  30. investable
    • 2007 October 28, Julie Bick, “For Those Born Rich, Lessons in How to Stay That Way”, New York Times:
      Eighty percent of its members have investable assets of at least $50 million, and her organization tries to help people become more sophisticated stewards of their wealth.
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  31. invitationals
    • 2007 October 28, The Associated Press, “Losing at the Masters Showed Harrington That He Could Win”, New York Times:
      He was No. 139 on the money list when the Fall Series began, but a playoff loss at the Valero Texas Open has helped move him to No. 88, and now he is trying to go higher to get into the invitationals.
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  32. jockography
    • 2007 October 28, Bryan Curtis, “Capote at the Bat”, New York Times:
      The sports memoir or jockography has not received the same critical attention as the campus novel or the hack western.
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  33. kolace
    • 2007 October 28, New York Times[1]:
      I should point out that kolace come in different varieties: those made with cheese, or prunes, or poppy seeds (rather like blintzes).
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  34. kundan
    • 2007 October 28, David Colman, “A Man Whos All Thumbs (and a Ring Finger)”, New York Times:
      Shaped like a gold flower, a kundan is a charm set with nine stones, one for each of seven heavenly bodies the sun, the moon, Mercury, Venus, Mars, Jupiter and Saturn and two more for the lunar nodes.
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  35. linezolid
    • 2007 October 28, Kevin Sack, “A (Sometimes) Deadly Scourge”, New York Times:
      Instead, the agency recommends treatment with clindamycin, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, doxycycline, minocycline, rifampin or linezolid.
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  36. lipogenic
    • 2007 October 28, “Eat, Drink and Be Wary”, New York Times:
      As James Rosenzweig, director of the office of disease management at the Joslin Diabetes Center in Boston, phrased it, using the technical terminology, weight gain on insulin therapy can result from the direct lipogenic effects of insulin on adipose tissue, independent of food intake.
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  37. listserve
    • 2007 October 28, Maggie Jones, “Looking for Their Childrens Birth Mothers”, New York Times:
      I heard about the searcher, who because of the sensitivity of her work asked me to identify her by the first initial of her name, S., more than a year ago on an adoption listserve.
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  38. listserves
    • 2007 October 28, Maggie Jones, “Looking for Their Childrens Birth Mothers”, New York Times:
      As I contemplated whether to search, I scoured listserves dedicated to adoptive parents who had searched or were considering doing so.
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  39. macroeditor
    • 2007 October 28, Charles Mcgrath, “I, Editor Author”, New York Times:
      (There are no published scholarly studies of Mr. Lishs edited manuscripts, which are now owned by the Lilly Library at Indiana University , but Mr. Carver often published his stories in magazines and journals before turning them over to Mr. Lish for collection in hardcover, and by comparing the magazine and book versions its possible to infer a fair amount.) Mr. Lish was a macroeditor, ruthless and aggressive, and he sometimes seemed to sense what Mr. Carver was trying to say even more clearly than Mr. Carver.
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  40. mediascape
    • 2007 October 28, Dennis Lim, “Booed at Cannes, but Now the Real Test”, New York Times:
      Southland Tales simulates the oversaturation of the 21st-century mediascape and delights in, even as it mocks, the vulgar absurdities of celebrity culture. Ms. Gellars character, for example, is a multitasking, politically minded sex-film star Jenna Jameson meets Arianna Huffington , Mr. Kelly said with a View-like talk show and a hit song called Teen Horniness Is Not a Crime (co-written by Mr. Kelly and to be released as a single).
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  41. microturbines
  42. midpack
  43. midprotest
    • 2007 October 28, Celia Mcgee, “Barely a Moments Peace to Be Antiwar”, New York Times:
      Her husband, the documentary filmmaker Henry Chalfant, was still midprotest but had promised to call her.
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  44. minifilms
    • 2007 October 28, Virginia Heffernan, “Varsity Video”, New York Times:
      Given hours of aimless footage lets call that life itself marketing services around the country now produce minifilms in which, to the tune of Dream On or Whoomp!
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  45. moxifloxacin
    • 2007 October 28, Kevin Sack, “A (Sometimes) Deadly Scourge”, New York Times:
      As the article noted, MRSA skin infections can respond to oral antibiotics like levofloxacin or moxifloxacin.
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  46. multifidus
    • 2007 October 28, Gretchen Reynolds, “Twist and Ouch”, New York Times:
      So are the less familiar intertransversi, interspinalis and multifidus muscles, which link to the larger abdominal group but which rarely figure in magazine articles about washboard abs.
      add
  47. museful
    • 2007 October 28, Richard Ford, “The Noise Is Killing Me”, New York Times:
      Or have the games lush repetitions become less lush, less museful due to all the distractions and gluttonous overexposure?
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  48. musicophiliac
    • 2007 October 28, Anthony Gottlieb, “Take Five, and Call Me”, New York Times:
      A dozen years later, Cicoria is still an extreme musicophiliac but has no desire to investigate his own condition with the finer-tuned forms of brain scanning that are now available.
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  49. netter
    • 2007 October 28, Wynne Parry, “A Wing and a Prayer”, New York Times:
      A bakery on the corner discarded large bags of old bread that attract flocks of birds, and Mr. Urbina suspected that the birds would in turn attract the netter.
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  50. netters
    • 2007 October 28, Wynne Parry, “A Wing and a Prayer”, New York Times:
      He had heard rumors that netters lure the birds with food, then spirit them away to mysterious destinations.
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  51. nonbranding
    • 2007 October 28, William Safire, “And Now This”, New York Times:
      Larry King also uses nonbranding cues: Lets deal with the next item.
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  52. noncommuter
    • 2007 October 28, Lisa Chamberlain, “Two Border Cities, One Shared Lifestyle”, New York Times:
      A dedicated commuter lane helps Ms. Giner to zip through the crossing, though the noncommuter lines have gotten longer lately in preparation for stricter border-crossing rules scheduled to take effect in January.
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  53. nonreaders
    • 2007 October 28, “My Reader, My Double”, New York Times:
      It was a best seller in Germany, too, because there are many nonreaders in Germany, and they want to see their rights defended.
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  54. nonreading
    • 2007 October 28, “My Reader, My Double”, New York Times:
      I think between reading and nonreading there is an indeterminate space that is quite important, a space where you have books you have skimmed, books you have heard about and books you have forgotten.
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  55. nonretirement
  56. outrushed
  57. overrehearsed
    • 2007 October 28, Gregory Cowles, “Grievous Angel”, New York Times:
      In a long digression, he hilariously but needlessly indulges his hatred of the Eagles: soulless, overrehearsed, antiseptic, schematic, insincere, sentimental ... the most consistently contemptible stadium band in rock.
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  58. overscale
  59. preconference
  60. quoining
    • 2007 October 28, Christopher Gray, “A Wallflower Overshadowed by Its Neighbors”, New York Times:
      His architectural firm, Warren & Wetmore, designed it as a solid, tasteful building, topping the two-story limestone base with 10 floors of simple brick bounded by a projecting masonry cornice and limestone quoining.
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  61. remobilizing
    • 2007 October 28, Kirk Semple, “Afghan Ex-Militia Leaders Hoard Arms”, New York Times:
      Although there is little hard evidence that commanders are greatly enlarging their arsenals, officials say, some have been thwarting government programs, refusing to disarm and possibly even remobilizing militias.
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  62. ridgeside
  63. rido *
    • 2007 October 28, Carlos H. Conde, “Clans Complicate Philippine Conflict”, New York Times:
      While clan conflict is common in many societies, rido is an especially volatile force because it has, according to the study, wider implications for conflict in Mindanao, primarily because it tends to interact in unfortunate ways with separatist conflict and other forms of armed violence.
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  64. scoffingly
    • 2007 October 28, John Strausbaugh, “Sidewalk Hero, on the Horns of a Revival”, New York Times:
      Moondogs German friends had convinced him by then to set aside the Viking helmet and cloak, which they scoffingly referred to as his amateur Odin costume, referring to the figure from Norse mythology.
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  65. seniorhood
    • 2007 October 28, Janet Morrissey, “If Its Retail, Is It Still Rock?”, New York Times:
      Like other rockers easing into middle age or seniorhood, Mr. McKagan is also experimenting with new partnerships in response to a music business in flux.
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  66. sententiousness
    • 2007 October 28, Pankaj Mishra, “Favorite Things”, New York Times:
      His occasional attempts to explain it were tinged with the self-regard and sententiousness commonplace among many artists in the 1950s and 60s who, like Coltrane, almost lost themselves to drugs and alcohol before finding religion.
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  67. sheepherding
    • 2007 October 28, Stuart Emmrich, “Datebook”, New York Times:
      Events taking place at C. B. Smith Park in Pembroke Pines include performances by 15 Australian musical acts, demonstrations of sheepherding, exhibitions of indigenous art, and a sampling of various Australian wines and native dishes, including the ever-popular meat pie.
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  68. sistema *
    • 2007 October 28, Arthur Lubow, “Conductor of the People”, New York Times:
      Sometimes Abreu emphasizes the spiritual enrichment that music brings to the individual; at other times, he points to evidence that students who go through the sistema become more productive and responsible members of society.
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  69. smally
    • 2007 October 28, Richard Ford, “The Noise Is Killing Me”, New York Times:
      Substituting something thats trivial-but-noisily-immediate for something thats virtuous even smally virtuous, like a game we play or ponder breeds an ugly cynicism about virtue itself.
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  70. sophora
    • 2007 October 28, Ellen Pall, “Meet the Neighbors”, New York Times:
      Then Dr. Day allowed herself to become distracted by a tree on the other side of 83rd Street, a sophora tree.
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  71. supernaturalism
    • 2007 October 28, “Jerry Seinfeld; Jimmy Carter Film; 12-Tone Composition; Supernatural TV”, New York Times:
      While the storyteller Doyle ended his career engaged in ghost hunting and endorsing the existence of fairies in the English countryside, James subjected paranormal claims to empirical study: admitting failure, separating supernaturalism from legitimate practices like hypnotism, and, ever the scientist, leaving open questions where due.
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  72. telelingo
    • 2007 October 28, William Safire, “And Now This”, New York Times:
      Native speakers of cue language, an introductory chapter in the book of telelingo, know instinctively that the same word, spoken with a sinking inflection, gains a wholly different meaning.
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  73. trimba
    • 2007 October 28, John Strausbaugh, “Sidewalk Hero, on the Horns of a Revival”, New York Times:
      Working in Braille, often composing under his cloak on the sidewalk, he wrote in an impressively wide range of styles: percussion-driven exotica (he made his own triangular drum-and-cymbal instrument, the trimba), avant-garde jazz, folkish madrigals, Bach-like neo-Baroque rounds and canons for chamber orchestra, symphonies for full orchestra, and a layered minimalism that influenced his young collaborators Steve Reich and Philip Glass .
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  74. ultrarich
    • 2007 October 28, Dave Kinney, “Future Shocks for Car Collectors”, New York Times:
      BUGATTI VEYRON Even the ultrarich can play the new car collectible game with the Bugatti Veyron, a 1,001-horsepower machine with a list price of more than $1.4 million.
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  75. unbully
  76. unchastised
    • 2007 October 28, Joe Queenan, “Consider the Toothpick”, New York Times:
      The very existence of The Toothpick is a testimony to the perils of inhabiting a permissive society, for just as the unchastised teenage shoplifter, mistaking societys indulgence for applause, will evolve into a bloodthirsty hired killer, it is inevitable that the author of The Pencil will one day morph into the author of The Toothpick.
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  77. undazzling
    • 2007 October 28, Caryn James, “The Sound of Personalities Clashing”, New York Times:
      He described the undazzling queen and Nixon as tragic, lonely characters, whom were drawn to because theres something so moving about seeing someone bad at intimacy be forced to be intimate.
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  78. underrealized
    • 2007 October 28, Evan Hughes, “Doctors in Distress”, New York Times:
      So subtle is the narration, and so committed is Lam to the primacy of showing over telling, that dramatic potential sometimes goes underrealized.
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  79. unfluent
  80. unfoldings
    • 2007 October 28, Bruce Handy, “Nothing You Can Know That Isnt Known”, New York Times:
      If I had the space, Id cite dozens more examples of Goulds graceful unfoldings of various Beatle tunes.
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  81. universalists
    • 2007 October 28, Ann Hulbert, “What Every Child Needs”, New York Times:
      It is a vexed question for liberal universalists, since the answer tends to vary by, among other things, economic class.
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  82. unredacts
    • 2007 October 28, Scott Shane, “Spies Do a Huge Volume of Work in Invisible Ink”, New York Times:
      The publisher, Simon & Schuster, has appended an 80-page afterword by a journalist that essentially unredacts the redactions, giving many of the facts that the C.I.A.s Publications Review Board cut from Ms. Wilsons text.
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  83. unrespect
    • 2007 October 28, William Safire, “And Now This”, New York Times:
      I cant tell you what my pet, Peeve, scornfully does on a newspaper that treats the language with such unrespect.
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  84. unruffling
    • 2007 October 28, Suzanne Slesin, “Where Understatement Is the Watchword”, New York Times:
      The fire escapes had been transformed into 108-square-foot terraces, and there was a general feeling of understatement and an unusual sense of being in a civilized, unruffling place.
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  85. vajayjay *
    • 2007 October 28, Stephanie Rosenbloom, “What Did You Call It?”, New York Times:
      The swift adoption of vajayjay is not simply about pop cultures ability to embrace new slang.
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  86. watchness
    • 2007 October 28, Rob Walker, “Timeless Object”, New York Times:
      It has more value because its missing its functional component, Berger suggests; a thing thats more of a comment on watchness than a watch provides more information about the person wearing it.
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Sequestered[edit]

  1. obsfucates = obfuscates
    • 2007 October 28, Pauline W. Chen, “Heart and Soul”, New York Times:
      Although his use of medical jargon sometimes obsfucates, Morris captures, with just the right details, the universes of fiercely competitive medical specialists and their teams, where responses are often not what one might expect.
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  2. psy = psytrance
    • 2007 October 28, The Editors, “Up Front”, New York Times:
      Musically, Dyer said, my taste immatured with age: in my late 30s I emigrated from jazz to house, techno and psy trance.
      add