User:Visviva/NYT 20071104

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This is a list of lowercase non-hyphenated single words found in the 2007-11-04 issue of the New York Times which did not have English entries in the English Wiktionary when this list was created (2009-02-26).

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239097 tokens ‧ 175718 valid lowercase tokens ‧ 15579 types ‧ 139 (~ 0.892%) words before cleaning ‧ 

2007-11-04[edit]

  1. agoraphobe
    • 2007 November 4, Dave Itzkoff, “A Satirical Sit-Coms Memorable Music”, New York Times:
      The following season Mr. Murphy composed an original Broadway-style number for a scene in which Brian the dog attempts to persuade an elderly agoraphobe to leave her home.
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  2. archrealists
    • 2007 November 4, James Traub, “Is (His) Biography (Our) Destiny?”, New York Times:
      The foreign-policy figures whom he finds most compelling, he says, are the archrealists who shaped policy during the cold war, including the secretaries of state George C. Marshall and Dean Acheson and the diplomat-scholar George F. Kennan .
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  3. backloaded
    • 2007 November 4, Caryn James, “Rivers of Blood in a Winter Wonderland”, New York Times:
      Every year is backloaded with serious Oscar bait, and the audiences tolerance for close-up goriness gets higher all the time.
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  4. banlieues *
    • 2007 November 4, Elisabeth Vincentelli, “You Are What Your Name Says You Are”, New York Times:
      But Guy Desplanques, a demographer, pointed out in 2002 that names like Ahmed and Jamila actually were on the wane, and that second-generation French men and women work toward integration by coming up with variations like Yanis or Rayan; the latter has become popular in some banlieues, evoking both the Maghreb and the relatively widespread Ryan.
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  5. biopoetics
    • 2007 November 4, D. T. Max, “Swanns Hypothesis”, New York Times:
      There is a literary-scientific movement called biopoetics, led by the Harvard professor E. O. Wilson, that wants the humanities, as he wrote in his 1999 book Consilience, rationalized.
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  6. blinis
    • 2007 November 4, Melissa Feldman, “Now Flavoring”, New York Times:
      Get out the blinis.
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  7. budavol
    • 2007 November 4, Virginia Heffernan, “God and Man on YouTube”, New York Times:
      In one wounding exchange, Crusader18 says to budavol, a tenacious spokesman for secular values: Your bigotry towards Christians leads me to believe you may have been molested by a priest .
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  8. burrata
    • 2007 November 4, Alexandra Jacobs, “The Green Party”, New York Times:
      Beavan relaxes his strictures when he is a guest, as at a recent dinner party given by the fashion designer Lela Rose, where the menu included burrata flown in from Italy.
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  9. checkoffs
  10. chuba
    • 2007 November 4, Shaila Dewan, “Emorys Little Tibet”, New York Times:
      DRESSED in a pale blue, floor-length chuba, Paige Wilson silently mouthed a paragraph-long greeting, in Tibetan, that she was about to deliver to the Dalai Lama .
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  11. cocalero
    • 2007 November 4, Dave Kehr, “Heroes and Villains, Swords and Soldiers”, New York Times:
      "COCALERO" The Brazilian documentarian Alejandro Landes traces the rise of Evo Morales, the leader of the "cocalero" movement, comprised of coca-growing farmers who have resisted American attempts to eradicate their crops, who became president of Bolivia in 2006.
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  12. cocotte *
    • 2007 November 4, Charlotte Druckman, “Put a Lid on It”, New York Times:
      And a bit of wordplay cocotte is also a term of endearment used between girlfriends informed the name of the new food bookshop/patisserie La Cocotte (below; 5, rue Paul Bert; 011-33-1-43-73-04-02), which is run by four women.
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  13. cocotted
    • 2007 November 4, Charlotte Druckman, “Put a Lid on It”, New York Times:
      Coco & Co (11, rue Bernard Palissy; 011-33-1-45-44-02-52), a just-opened cafe devoted to the egg, offers 20 cocotted versions and also allows for custom creations.
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  14. cocottes *
    • 2007 November 4, Charlotte Druckman, “Put a Lid on It”, New York Times:
      Paris is cuckoo for cocottes.
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  15. corporatists
    • 2007 November 4, Matt Bai, “Home-Office Politics”, New York Times:
      This may be because, for Democrats in the Bush era, accepting changes in the workplace is considered tantamount to siding with Bushian corporatists.
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  16. corruptable
    • 2007 November 4, Mary Beth Norton, “Dear Abby”, New York Times:
      Three years later, Abigail was somewhat more positive: Tho wrong in Politicks, tho formerly an advocate for Tom Pains Rights of Man and tho frequently mistaken in Men and Measures, I do not think him an insincere or a corruptable Man. My Friendship for him has ever been unshaken.
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  17. countercoalition
  18. counterproductively
    • 2007 November 4, “The Conscience of a Liberal”, New York Times:
      Krugman may be simplistic and counterproductively partisan in his finger-pointing, but I dont see Kennedy doing much better.
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  19. daredeviltry
  20. datacentric
  21. diaperless
    • 2007 November 4, Donald G. Mcneil Jr., “A Sanitation Crisis Thats No Joke”, New York Times:
      It is the brainchild of Jack Sim, a Singapore real estate mogul who grew up in poverty and remembers seeing children in his neighborhood shedding worms as they ran around diaperless.
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  22. dishwashable
    • 2007 November 4, Alexandra Jacobs, “The Green Party”, New York Times:
      We buy these plates and cups from the Park Slope co-op, said one popular Brooklyn hostess ruefully, that are eco-correct and dishwashable.
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  23. dormlike
    • 2007 November 4, Joyce Cohen, “Ready for City Life”, New York Times:
      While they hunted, they were given temporary room and board at the Markle Residence near Salvation Army headquarters in Greenwich Village, where women can rent dormlike rooms.
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  24. elegiacally
    • 2007 November 4, Claire Dederer, “The Inner Scholar”, New York Times:
      He was co-founder of Naropa's writing program, the elegiacally named Jack Kerouac School of Disembodied Poetics, later that year.
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  25. etherealness
    • 2007 November 4, Margy Rochlin, “A Disney Princess, Not Winking but Floating”, New York Times:
      Too much wink, is how Mr. Lima described other actresses coy takes on Giselle. Ms. Adams, on the other hand, could imitate a hand-drawn Disney heroines zero-gravity etherealness and dainty gestures and still convey plenty of feeling.
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  26. evokers
    • 2007 November 4, D. T. Max, “Swanns Hypothesis”, New York Times:
      Fast forward some 90 years to 2002, when Rachel Herz, a psychologist at Brown, shows that smell and taste are indeed uniquely potent evokers of memory.
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  27. filmgoing
    • 2007 November 4, David Carr, “The Little Gold Man Made Me Do It”, New York Times:
      The filmgoing public is all the better for all these movies, but the dreary financial numbers will go down a little better if film companies are in the hunt for an Oscar, the kind of recognition that could provide a boost for movies that still have a ways to go to recoup their costs.
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  28. forbearingly
  29. glamfest
    • 2007 November 4, Eric Sylvers, “Its Not a Popemobile but It Comes in Handy”, New York Times:
      The conference sort of a public version of Allen & Companys annual media glamfest in Sun Valley, Idaho is scheduled to feature speakers including Jeffrey L. Bewkes , president and chief operating officer of Time Warner; Susan Lyne, president and chief executive of Martha Stewart Living Omnimedia ; and Michael D. Eisner , the former Walt Disney chief executive who now runs an investment company called Tornante.
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  30. grapelike
    • 2007 November 4, Merrill Stubbs, “The New Staples”, New York Times:
      Also known as hardy kiwi, these grapelike orbs share the same sweet tang of their larger cousin sans fuzz.
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  31. greenskeeper
    • 2007 November 4, “Bonnie Regan, James Gerhart”, New York Times:
      His father retired as the assistant greenskeeper at Spook Rock Golf Course, also in Suffern.
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  32. gruyere
    • 2007 November 4, Merrill Stubbs, “The New Staples”, New York Times:
      7 ounces gruyere, grated
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  33. hatefest
    • 2007 November 4, Ed Park, “Seeing Things”, New York Times:
      In Reunion, a professor emotionally if not physically numb makes the mistake of attending his 30th college reunion, a woozy hatefest that triggers the ferocious memory of an undergraduate love affair, its intensity at odds with his current apathy.
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  34. headcheese
    • 2007 November 4, Jonathan Miles, “The Perfect Match With Pigs Tails”, New York Times:
      And as the man who made a restaurant specializing in crispy pigs tails, headcheese and pot-roasted pigs head into an international destination, and frequented by locals like Bryan Ferry, Cate Blanchett and Madonna, his influence should not be underestimated.
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  35. hiccuped
    • 2007 November 4, Samantha Stainburn, “Tufts Asks for 250 Words of Wisdom”, New York Times:
      Good answer Hey Ugly, I think I called her ... and the laughter rolled softly like twin tympanies behind me, and she hiccuped.
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  36. insidery
    • 2007 November 4, Brooks Barnes, “The Littlest Big Shots”, New York Times:
      For big-shot agents, studio executives and producers, placing their children well within camera shot at the Nickelodeon Kids Choice Awards is an insidery symbol of power.
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  37. intrapersonal
    • 2007 November 4, “Consciousness Raising”, New York Times:
      Joseph Renzullis triad for identifying giftedness is best described as: a. above-average ability, task commitment, creativity b. skillful processing of verbal information, artistic expression, assertiveness c. high I.Q. scores, academic aptitude, practical intelligence d. language fluency, analytical problem-solving ability, ethical thinking e. interpersonal intelligence, intrapersonal intelligence, logical-mathematical intelligence
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  38. khakied
    • 2007 November 4, Claire Dederer, “The Inner Scholar”, New York Times:
      Then he unlaced his brown oxfords, folded up his khakied legs, adjusted his button-down collar, and proceeded to meditate for 20 minutes.
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  39. lowriders
    • 2007 November 4, Jerry Garrett, “Daring You to Try This at Home”, New York Times:
      The Riviera actually includes a couple of once-popular customizing options that trend-watchers think are on their way out: lowriders and spinners.
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  40. mahaleb
    • 2007 November 4, Merrill Stubbs, “The New Staples”, New York Times:
      Like wattleseed, mahlab (a k a mahaleb, mahleb, mahlepi or mahlep) claims ancient roots.
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  41. mahlab
    • 2007 November 4, Merrill Stubbs, “The New Staples”, New York Times:
      Like wattleseed, mahlab (a k a mahaleb, mahleb, mahlepi or mahlep) claims ancient roots.
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  42. mahleb
    • 2007 November 4, Merrill Stubbs, “The New Staples”, New York Times:
      Like wattleseed, mahlab (a k a mahaleb, mahleb, mahlepi or mahlep) claims ancient roots.
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  43. mahlep
    • 2007 November 4, Merrill Stubbs, “The New Staples”, New York Times:
      Like wattleseed, mahlab (a k a mahaleb, mahleb, mahlepi or mahlep) claims ancient roots.
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  44. mahlepi
    • 2007 November 4, Merrill Stubbs, “The New Staples”, New York Times:
      Like wattleseed, mahlab (a k a mahaleb, mahleb, mahlepi or mahlep) claims ancient roots.
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  45. marathoning
    • 2007 November 4, Michael Schwirtz, “A Success Story Out of Post-Soviet Wreckage”, New York Times:
      Joining Prokopcuka for the 26.2-mile race through New Yorks five boroughs toward victory at Central Parks Tavern on the Green will be the marathoning luminaries Lidiya Grigoryeva of Russia, who edged out Prokopcuka to win the 2007 Boston Marathon, and Catherine Ndereba of Kenya, the third-place finisher at last years New York City Marathon.
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  46. marxoline
    • 2007 November 4, Zo Wolff, “But Can He Hum?”, New York Times:
      HIT IT, MAESTRO Zach Condon of the band Beirut playing a marxoline.
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  47. massa *
    • 2007 November 4, Charles Taylor And Stephanie Zacharek, “Swords, Songs and Women on the Run”, New York Times:
      When a rich white racist slaps Mr. Poitier, and Mr. Poitier slaps the arrogant massa right back, its preachy, but its also awfully satisfying to see Mr. Poitier behaving less than nobly, uncoiling, even for a moment, the power he usually holds in reserve.
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  48. mbalax
  49. megatote
    • 2007 November 4, Alix Browne, “It Baggage”, New York Times:
      Romans transition out of diapers spawned models like the multipocketed trooper tote (roomy enough to hold food, toys and clothes), which spawned the megatote (it holds several trooper totes).
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  50. metallicized
    • 2007 November 4, Edward Helmore, “Re-Arranging the Furniture”, New York Times:
      Designers tend to get noticed when they make big things: theres an enthusiastic but ultimately limited market for, say, his Mirror Ball, S-Chair or the new Slab Table (an oak table, metallicized to a mirror finish, which he showed at the Milan Furniture Fair last spring).
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  51. microcivilizations
    • 2007 November 4, Caroline Weber, “Tour de France”, New York Times:
      Yet according to Robb, who has written biographies of Victor Hugo, Honor de Balzac and Arthur Rimbaud, these microcivilizations were not formless planetoids waiting to be swallowed by a giant state, and their inhabitants didnt constitute a shapeless mass of human raw material, waiting to be processed by the huge, mutating machine of political interference and turned into the people conveniently known as the French.
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  52. micromosaics
    • 2007 November 4, Carol Kino, “Boldly, Where No Dog Had Gone Before”, New York Times:
      In 2001 Mr. Wilson received a MacArthur Foundation genius award for his array of curious and awe-inducing exhibitions, which include dioramas and special effects that bring old wives tales and folk remedies to life; letters written in the early 20th century to astronomers at the nearby Mount Wilson Observatory; a homage to three ethnologists who documented cats cradles; and a collection of decaying dice donated by the magician Ricky Jay. There are all manner of miniatures, among them micromosaics of flowers made by Henry Dalton from butterfly wing scales and human hair sculptures fashioned within the eyes of needles by Hagop Sandaljian.
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  53. middlingly
    • 2007 November 4, Charles Isherwood, “Changing Coasts (and Accents, and Pay Grades)”, New York Times:
      Didactic to the last, he explains that, contrary to what sentimentalists might suppose, Eliza went on to marry the penniless Freddy Eynsford Hill and open a middlingly successful flower shop.
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  54. midmeal
    • 2007 November 4, “Sophie Donelson, Gregory Lindsay”, New York Times:
      He took her to a bistro, and if his dinner invitation did not clarify things, his midmeal kiss from across the table did.
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  55. midswing
    • 2007 November 4, Antoinette Martin, “Where Sales Are Buoyant”, New York Times:
      In Asbury, where a major redevelopment project is in midswing, the median increased by 9 percent this year, to $248,950.
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  56. milza *
    • 2007 November 4, Holly Brubach, “Reading About Eating”, New York Times:
      In Palermo, Italy, he assesses milza, grilled veal spleen mixed with lemon juice, salt and pepper and encased in a bun: The contrast of soft bun and chopped gland is superb.
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  57. minisoftware
    • 2007 November 4, Randall Stross, “Why Google Turned Into a Social Butterfly”, New York Times:
      An island that since May has been enlivened with entertaining fauna and flora in the form of minisoftware applications.
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  58. mislocated
    • 2007 November 4, Fred A. Bernstein, “Lifting a High Ranch to New Heights”, New York Times:
      The first time the wall was poured, the seams in the form (which produced corresponding lines in the concrete) were mislocated.
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  59. multipocketed
    • 2007 November 4, Alix Browne, “It Baggage”, New York Times:
      Romans transition out of diapers spawned models like the multipocketed trooper tote (roomy enough to hold food, toys and clothes), which spawned the megatote (it holds several trooper totes).
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  60. muttniks
    • 2007 November 4, Carol Kino, “Boldly, Where No Dog Had Gone Before”, New York Times:
      But a quieter celebration of Laika and her colleagues can be found here at the Museum of Jurassic Technology, where glowing oil portraits of five of the most lauded muttniks (as they were nicknamed by the American press) have been displayed for close to two years.
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  61. nonnas
    • 2007 November 4, Stephanie Rosenbloom, “Fall in Love for a Good Cause”, New York Times:
      ON the spectrum of aspiring Cupids, Pari Livermore ought to be categorized somewhere between the hundreds of professional matchmakers and the millions of meddling grannies, bubbies, nanas and nonnas.
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  62. nonsynthetic
    • 2007 November 4, “Letters”, New York Times:
      I buy nonsynthetic products not because Im afraid of getting Alzheimers from deodorant, but because I dont want to be pumping them into our water system.
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  63. nonthrowing
    • 2007 November 4, New York Times[1]:
      Kurt Warner , playing with a torn ligament in the elbow of his nonthrowing arm, has six turnovers in his last four games.
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  64. oenophilia
    • 2007 November 4, Michael Steinberger, “What Would Bacchus Do?”, New York Times:
      Smith contends that, contrary to the oft-repeated incantation that taste is personal and all opinions are equally valid, oenophilia is not a strictly subjective exercise, and some people are more adept at judging Burgundies and Rhones than others.
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  65. overstyled
    • 2007 November 4, Alice Rawsthorn, “The Pod People”, New York Times:
      But those tiny aluminum pods, and the overstyled espresso machines that use them, sum up much of what goes wrong with design when marketing is dressed up as innovation.
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  66. pantelleria
    • 2007 November 4, “T-Bones and Tea”, New York Times:
      His menu features steaks, lamb and seafood, all served on hot rocks and in sizzling skillets, and homemade pasta dishes like pappardelle with lamb and artichoke ragu, and spaghetti vongole served with a touch of pantelleria red pepper sauce.
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  67. pentothal
    • 2007 November 4, Elizabeth Weil, “Its Not Whether to Kill, but How”, New York Times:
      The three-drug cocktail is meant to mimic the induction of general anesthesia and it works like this: The execution team inserts an IV line into the condemned prisoner and then delivers a dose of sodium pentothal, an ultrashort-acting barbiturate, intended to render the inmate deeply unconscious.
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  68. phonofiddle
    • 2007 November 4, Zo Wolff, “But Can He Hum?”, New York Times:
      At the back of the couch is a phonofiddle.
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  69. posintang
    • 2007 November 4, Holly Brubach, “Reading About Eating”, New York Times:
      While most of the Koreans he meets are quick to assure him that dog is a traditional dish, shunned by those with more refined palates, a taxi driver volunteers the basis for its enduring appeal: One bowl of posintang [dog soup] gives you long time sexy.
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  70. pressbox
    • 2007 November 4, The Associated Press, “Kansas 76, Nebraska 39”, New York Times:
      With the interim athletic director Tom Osborne watching from a pressbox suite, Nebraska (4-6, 1-5) lost its fifth straight for the first time since 1958.
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  71. prewarmed
    • 2007 November 4, Andy Newman, “Societys Politics, as Seen Through a Porcelain Lens”, New York Times:
      Surely the fear of the prewarmed seat, said Ruth Barcan, a professor of gender and cultural studies at the University of Sydney, Australia, is less a rationally grounded fear of infection than a fear of the touch of the stranger, the Other who is so like us as to share our bodily shape and our bodily needs, but unknown to us, and therefore potentially contaminating.
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  72. prisoned
    • 2007 November 4, Mary Beth Norton, “Dear Abby”, New York Times:
      Upon learning that his former friend Jefferson intended to resign as secretary of state in late 1793, John observed, Instead of being the ardent pursuer of science that some think him, I know he is indolent, and his soul is prisoned with Ambition.
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  73. pundettes
    • 2007 November 4, Maureen Dowd, “Gift of Gall”, New York Times:
      When pundettes tut-tut that playing the victim is not what a feminist should do, they forget that Hillary is not a feminist.
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  74. puzzlelike
    • 2007 November 4, Michelle Slatalla, “ACT vs. SAT”, New York Times:
      The SAT is more nuanced, puzzlelike, trickier.
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  75. rabbley
    • 2007 November 4, Virginia Heffernan, “God and Man on YouTube”, New York Times:
      But as a commenter named AuraX says of the message board, this is the battlefield a rabbley showdown that positions itself along the fault lines of the worlds great debates.
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  76. ragu
    • 2007 November 4, “T-Bones and Tea”, New York Times:
      His menu features steaks, lamb and seafood, all served on hot rocks and in sizzling skillets, and homemade pasta dishes like pappardelle with lamb and artichoke ragu, and spaghetti vongole served with a touch of pantelleria red pepper sauce.
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  77. ratchety
    • 2007 November 4, Jon Pareles, “Poetry, Peru, Psychedelia and Soul, With Folkie Flavors”, New York Times:
      Pretty webs of acoustic picking are blotched with static and ratchety clatter or punctuated with arbitrary spoken-word samples, while placid, smoky voices offer thoughts like We sing as the sky collapses.
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  78. rechanging
    • 2007 November 4, Charles Mcgrath, “Smells Like Team Spirit”, New York Times:
      The players, too, have a role in the elaborate mating dance that ensues, stringing along as many as half a dozen colleges at a time, changing and then rechanging their minds, and lying almost as much as the coaches do.
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  79. rerent
    • 2007 November 4, Joyce Cohen, “Ready for City Life”, New York Times:
      The condo owner, eager to rerent it, dropped the price to $3,500 from $3,900.
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  80. ruddies
    • 2007 November 4, Deborah Baldwin, “Close to Nature, and the Airport”, New York Times:
      In winter, snow geese land at West Pond, a Robert Moses legacy that ought to be called Duck Soup: at this time of year look for ruddies, greater scaups, Northern pintails, American widgeons and gadwalls.
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  81. scaups
    • 2007 November 4, Deborah Baldwin, “Close to Nature, and the Airport”, New York Times:
      In winter, snow geese land at West Pond, a Robert Moses legacy that ought to be called Duck Soup: at this time of year look for ruddies, greater scaups, Northern pintails, American widgeons and gadwalls.
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  82. scrumming
    • 2007 November 4, Rob Walker, “Getting Along Famously”, New York Times:
      Along the way, they noticed that many so-called Web 2.0 start-ups were scrumming to be the next MySpace or at least to drum up enough of a user base to build a profitable business model.
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  83. searchings
    • 2007 November 4, Mark Oppenheimer, “The Turning of an Atheist”, New York Times:
      Depending on whom you ask, Antony Flew is either a true convert whose lifelong intellectual searchings finally brought him to God or a senescent scholar possibly being exploited by his associates.
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  84. seiners
    • 2007 November 4, Paul Greenberg, “A Tuna Meltdown”, New York Times:
      Large trawlers and purse seiners devastated all of these populations.
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  85. semipublic
  86. silents
    • 2007 November 4, Sylviane Gold, “Demon Barber, Meat Pies and All, Sings on Screen”, New York Times:
      He talked with Mr. Depp, also a silents fan, about the approach; their touchstones were Lon Chaney , Boris Karloff , Bela Lugosi and Peter Lorre , especially, Mr. Depp said, Lorres creepy but sympathetic surgeon in the 1935 thriller Mad Love.
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  87. silversmithing
    • 2007 November 4, Pilar Viladas, “Silver Polish”, New York Times:
      Caravel combines the primal power of sculpture with the finesse of Danish silversmithing all the more impressive considering it was Koppels first attempt at cutlery.
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  88. skylike
  89. speedskater
  90. speedskates
  91. sportsspeak
    • 2007 November 4, Charles Mcgrath, “Smells Like Team Spirit”, New York Times:
      Mr. Dowling is appropriately scathing about some of the embarrassments during the reign of the current athletic director, Robert E. Mulcahy, including a plague of commercial sportsspeak infecting many of the universitys official pronouncements and an attempt to squelch the college journalism department when one of its students uncovered a program of special study groups in effect, hidden, unlisted courses available only to athletes.
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  92. stagefright
    • 2007 November 4, Rachel Aviv, “Dont Be Shy”, New York Times:
      Some students are simply shy or experience stagefright; others are paralyzed in social situations.
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  93. subprimes
    • 2007 November 4, Ford Fessenden, “College Towns Escape the Pain”, New York Times:
      Where subprimes are turning up is in hot markets, but also in places like Cleveland and Detroit, Mr. Katz said.
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  94. superbad
    • 2007 November 4, Charles Taylor And Stephanie Zacharek, “Swords, Songs and Women on the Run”, New York Times:
      Two different kinds of outsiders highlight releases that day: Catherine Deneuve , above, does very bad things in Roman Polanski s Repulsion, and Jonah Hill and Michael Cera do superbad and supersweet things in Superbad.
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  95. superglue
    • 2007 November 4, Charles Taylor And Stephanie Zacharek, “Swords, Songs and Women on the Run”, New York Times:
      No wonder those memories sometimes calcify into a kind of superglue between two people who were once in love.
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  96. superprimary
  97. tristar
    • 2007 November 4, Keith Martin, “An Associate Makes Full Partner”, New York Times:
      The Luxury model has a hood ornament bearing the tristar emblem, like other Mercedes sedans.
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  98. tweediest
    • 2007 November 4, Claire Dederer, “The Inner Scholar”, New York Times:
      A painter whose still lifes are shown in local galleries, he walked into his classroom looking like the tweediest, most patrician Yankee ever.
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  99. tylenolalcohol
    • 2007 November 4, Virginia Heffernan, “God and Man on YouTube”, New York Times:
      Similarly, Atheist (No. 10 most-discussed ever), which intersperses anti-atheist Bible passages with images of illustrious nonbelievers, has occasioned a sprawling argument about superstition, eschatology and scientism among viewers with screen names like tylenolalcohol and blindedbynoise.
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  100. tympanies
    • 2007 November 4, Samantha Stainburn, “Tufts Asks for 250 Words of Wisdom”, New York Times:
      Good answer Hey Ugly, I think I called her ... and the laughter rolled softly like twin tympanies behind me, and she hiccuped.
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  101. ukelin
    • 2007 November 4, Zo Wolff, “But Can He Hum?”, New York Times:
      Thats a ukelin on his lap and another next to it.
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  102. uncolorful
    • 2007 November 4, “Spreading Cheer, Doves and Transvestites”, New York Times:
      This everything shining and blinking, this everybody being sweet, being so kind and nice to one another, this shopping mania on each avenue, each street, even each alley, all these lights and decorations they are just there to remind each of us how uncolorful and nasty the other 360 days of the year are.
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  103. understyled
    • 2007 November 4, Keith Martin, “An Associate Makes Full Partner”, New York Times:
      The 190 was underpowered, undersized and certainly understyled, and the ones still on the road look more like used-up Toyota Corollas than Mercedes-Benzes.
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  104. unnamable
    • 2007 November 4, Charles Isherwood, “Changing Coasts (and Accents, and Pay Grades)”, New York Times:
      It is this unnamable, almost inexpressible kind of attachment that Mr. Mays and Ms. Danes fail to transmit clearly in this long, difficult scene.
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  105. untasty
    • 2007 November 4, “Spreading Cheer, Doves and Transvestites”, New York Times:
      Each year at Christmastime I feel Im stuffed with a heavy, greasy, fluffy, enormous piece of untasty chocolate cake that I not only have a hard time swallowing but that I can definitely never digest.
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  106. unvacillating
    • 2007 November 4, Jim Rutenberg, “Said That vs. Meant This, a Hot Matchup for 08”, New York Times:
      Even some of Mr. McCains supporters say such moves, meant to bolster his support with religious conservatives who have viewed him with suspicion, hurt his unvacillating, maverick brand and contributed to his stumble last spring.
      add
  107. upsize
    • 2007 November 4, Fred A. Bernstein, “Lifting a High Ranch to New Heights”, New York Times:
      The Seeligs hes 61, shes 58 are empty nesters who chose not to downsize, but to upsize, in a midlife assertion of their tastes and talents.
      add
  108. vacillator
    • 2007 November 4, Jim Rutenberg, “Said That vs. Meant This, a Hot Matchup for 08”, New York Times:
      Similarly, Ms. Cutter said, while Mr. Giuliani has provided openings for Democrats to attack him as a vacillator, his refusal to budge from his vocal support for abortion rights has strengthened his image as being steadfast, even as he has shifted in other areas.
      add
  109. vinoculture
    • 2007 November 4, Christine Muhlke, “Glass House”, New York Times:
      Even the shopping bags bottle-shaped sleeves made of Bubble Wrap, designed by WineSkin with the cutting-edge firm 2x4 bring some much-needed sass to vinoculture.
      add
  110. vongole *
    • 2007 November 4, “T-Bones and Tea”, New York Times:
      His menu features steaks, lamb and seafood, all served on hot rocks and in sizzling skillets, and homemade pasta dishes like pappardelle with lamb and artichoke ragu, and spaghetti vongole served with a touch of pantelleria red pepper sauce.
      add
  111. wattleseed
    • 2007 November 4, Merrill Stubbs, “The New Staples”, New York Times:
      For thousands of years, Australian Aborigines have relied on wattleseed.
      add
  112. weebling
    • 2007 November 4, Jonathan Miles, “The Perfect Match With Pigs Tails”, New York Times:
      The drink is known in its native Italy as a Bicyclette owing, Mr. Henderson said, to the old men who drink it and then go weebling home upon their bicycles.
      add
  113. wherefores
    • 2007 November 4, Dorothy Kalins, “Taste Maker”, New York Times:
      Me. And if I was convinced that, if the book was so right for me, there were bound to be maybe thousands like me who really wanted to learn the whys and wherefores of good French cooking.
      add
  114. widescreens
    • 2007 November 4, Jerry Garrett, “Daring You to Try This at Home”, New York Times:
      There were video iPods mounted in the steering wheel and navigation systems converted to L.C.D. widescreens.
      add
  115. wunderkammer
    • 2007 November 4, Carol Kino, “Boldly, Where No Dog Had Gone Before”, New York Times:
      Tucked into a small storefront on Venice Boulevard, the museum has been called a modern-day wunderkammer and is the subject of a 1995 book, Mr. Wilsons Cabinet of Wonders (Pantheon), by Lawrence Weschler.
      add
  116. wussiness
    • 2007 November 4, Frank Rich, “Noun + Verb + 9/11 + Iran = Democrats Defeat?”, New York Times:
      They and the partys Congressional leaders, Tom Daschle and Dick Gephardt, voted for the Iraq war resolution out of the cynical calculation that it would inoculate them against charges of wussiness.
      add

Sequestered[edit]

  1. rodded