User:Visviva/NYT 20071118

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This is a list of lowercase non-hyphenated single words found in the 2007-11-18 issue of the New York Times which did not have English entries in the English Wiktionary when this list was created (2009-02-26).

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198778 tokens ‧ 145626 valid lowercase tokens ‧ 13738 types ‧ 98 (~ 0.713%) words before cleaning ‧ 

2007-11-18[edit]

  1. actorishly
    • 2007 November 18, Glen Duncan, “Young Man Behaving Badly”, New York Times:
      Being 26, I flung myself actorishly on London and without any intimations of my own ludicrousness spent two years showing God what I thought of him by letting myself go.
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  2. adventurings
    • 2007 November 18, David Leavitt, “City of Priam”, New York Times:
      A wealthy German businessman whose mercantile adventurings have taken him to Russia and America, he has revered the Greek world since his childhood.
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  3. bigfoot *
    • 2007 November 18, William Safire, “Retronymy”, New York Times:
      Frank, now a bigfoot P.R. executive, was once Bobby Kennedys moutpiece, and then, as George McGovern s presidential campaign manager, saw his candidate lead a gaggle of reporters into a New York delicatessen to demonstrate ethnic sensitivity but haplessly ordered a kosher hot dog and a glass of milk.
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  4. bioastronautics
    • 2007 November 18, The Associated Press, “Kicker Has His Sights Set Higher Than N.F.L.”, New York Times:
      Im doing bioastronautics, focusing on manned operations in space, whether that be Mars or on-orbit operations or the moon, he said.
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  5. brigadistas
    • 2007 November 18, Brooke Hauser, “For Chairman Moe, One Last Salute”, New York Times:
      In recent years, he also announced the deaths of his fellow brigadistas, as the fighters called themselves.
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  6. cellarlike
    • 2007 November 18, Claire Wilson, “A Stores Toast to Park Avenue”, New York Times:
      In the new store, replicated beams were added to the ceiling in the sales area, where cellarlike arches and accents are repeated in the events room on the second level.
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  7. clafoutis
    • 2007 November 18, Alex Hawgood, “Contributors”, New York Times:
      Now a book critic for The Times, Grimes eats at home more often: hes been making a lot of fig clafoutis, using fruit from a tree in his backyard.
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  8. cortexes
    • 2007 November 18, Kayleen Schaefer, “These Scientific Minds Think (and Drink) Alike”, New York Times:
      The same late-night revelers who spent their high school and college years plodding through mandatory science classes are now gathering voluntarily to listen to presentations on principles of string theory or how orbitofrontal cortexes work as long as it takes place far from the fluorescent lights of classroom.
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  9. counterpuncher
  10. craaaaazzzzy
    • 2007 November 18, Thomas L. Friedman, “Channeling Dick Cheney”, New York Times:
      If she were taking advantage of Mr. Cheneys madness, Secretary Rice would be going to Tehran and saying to the Iranians: Look, Im ready to cut a deal with you guys, but I have to tell you, back home, Ive got Cheney on my back and he is truly craaaaazzzzy.
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  11. dealigning
    • 2007 November 18, Fred Siegel, “Electoral Landscaping”, New York Times:
      Rather, Keller says, the years since 1968 can best be seen as part of a dealigning process that has left no one party in charge.
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  12. denars
    • 2007 November 18, Alissa J. Rubin, “Iraq Credits Iran for Helping to Curb Attacks by Militias”, New York Times:
      Also in a move to spur reconciliation between Shiites and Sunnis, the government announced it would pay one million Iraqi denars, about $812, to every displaced family who returned to its home.
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  13. detangled
    • 2007 November 18, Jon Mooallem, “The Sleep-Industrial Complex”, New York Times:
      A video promoting Hastenss $60,000 Vividus bed shows the horsehair its stuffed with being sensuously detangled and fluffed by shapely Nordic women.
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  14. embracingly
    • 2007 November 18, Lance Morrow, “How to Rule the World”, New York Times:
      Or with her somewhat more intricate (or circular?) case that even the most embracingly inclusive empires eventually disintegrate because they lack glue an overarching political identity to give coherence to the whole.
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  15. evanescing
    • 2007 November 18, Christopher Dickey, “Artificial Intelligence”, New York Times:
      The highest and lowest drama in Drogins book is the spectacle of administration evidence about Iraqs weapons evanescing in the months before and after the invasion.
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  16. ghoulies
    • 2007 November 18, Charles Mcgrath, “A Foggy Reunion With Horrors Master”, New York Times:
      If the story were only the monsters and the ghoulies, I wouldnt have been interested, Mr. Darabont said.
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  17. impurist
    • 2007 November 18, William Safire, “Retronymy”, New York Times:
      And H2O used to be called water until the elitist rage for bottled water, creating what the impurist cheapskates call tap water, sometimes apologetically called plain water or in New York City Giuliani water.
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  18. incognoscenti
    • 2007 November 18, William Safire, “Retronymy”, New York Times:
      Some incognoscenti grumped when they couldnt find the word in their dictionaries, but there it is in the with-it fourth American Heritage: A word or phrase created because an existing term that was once used alone needs to be distinguished from a term referring to a new development, as .
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  19. knowmad
    • 2007 November 18, Nathan Lump, “Vocabulary”, New York Times:
      Can be used in conjunction with a knowmad subgroups area of expertise, as in: I have to go to Germany soon.
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  20. learnable
    • 2007 November 18, Dave Itzkoff, “1. Find Drum. 2. Grab Stick. 3. Bang! Boom!”, New York Times:
      And the surest sign that his tribute had succeeded, Mr. Armisen said, would be if unsuspecting consumers purchased Complicated Drumming Technique believing that it contained any actual, learnable lessons.
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  21. loopiness
    • 2007 November 18, Jim Holt, “Mind of a Rock”, New York Times:
      Finally, there is the sheer loopiness of the idea that something like a photon could have proto-emotions, proto-beliefs and proto-desires.
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  22. lowrider
  23. lowriders
  24. lowriding
  25. microlevel
    • 2007 November 18, Jim Holt, “Mind of a Rock”, New York Times:
      But at the microlevel it consists of an unimaginable number of atoms connected by springy chemical bonds, all jiggling around at a rate that even our fastest supercomputer might envy.
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  26. midstory
    • 2007 November 18, Charles Mcgrath, “A Foggy Reunion With Horrors Master”, New York Times:
      Mr. Darabont started to explain that he had wanted to make a movie of The Mist from the moment he had read it, back in the 1980s, but he excused himself midstory to deal with a bit of horror at his own house: a fish emergency.
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  27. milquetoasty
    • 2007 November 18, Christine Muhlke, “The Sweet Hereafter”, New York Times:
      I made them a little more flavorful, a little less milquetoasty.
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  28. misiones *
    • 2007 November 18, “Letters: The Perils of Petrocracy”, New York Times:
      There is little reliable data on the extent of his misiones for the poor (financed by oil revenue).
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  29. mocap
  30. multicandidate
    • 2007 November 18, Adam Nagourney, “Republican Uncertainty Amid a Push by Giuliani”, New York Times:
      At this point, Mr. Romneys aides said, he has no intention of directly taking on either Mr. Giuliani or Mr. Huckabee with television advertisements attacks in a multicandidate race can be risky, especially since Iowa voters often turn away from candidates they view as negative. Mr. Romneys aides said that starting next month, he would intensify the heavy schedule of Iowa visits and television advertisements that has been a bedrock of his campaign.
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  31. nirvanic
    • 2007 November 18, Glen Duncan, “Young Man Behaving Badly”, New York Times:
      I, made in England, felt excluded, miffed, resistant to the idea of even visiting India, a position of increasing absurdity as one by one, backpacking friends returned from the place with the standard anecdotal combo of nirvanic epiphany and toilet horror.
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  32. nonhybrid
    • 2007 November 18, Jerry Garrett, “California Dreaming, Tinted Green”, New York Times:
      But the Volt at the show was powered by a nonhybrid motor suitable only for moving it on and off the stage.
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  33. nonproducing
    • 2007 November 18, Steven Greenhouse, “Report Cites Mine-Safety Agency Failures”, New York Times:
      In his response to the report, Richard E. Stickler , the assistant secretary of labor in charge of the mine safety agency, said 70 percent of the incomplete inspections were at mines that were either nonproducing, inactive, intermittent or abandoned.
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  34. novenas *
  35. nutsy
  36. oshpello
    • 2007 November 18, Alex Hawgood, “Contributors”, New York Times:
      I used to photograph her as she learned to cook Uzbek meals like oshpello, a traditional dish of rice and chicken (far left).
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  37. otherworldy
    • 2007 November 18, Jabari Asim, “Manhunt”, New York Times:
      They bring to mind a former N.B.A. All-Stars modest attempt to explain his otherworldy playmaking to a group of ordinary mortals.
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  38. overcoated
    • 2007 November 18, Rich Cohen, “Wiseguys”, New York Times:
      These bare, unworked facts evoke a scene right out of Hemingway, the overcoated wiseguy with the heater, the boy and the cook cowering in the kitchen (Another bright boy.
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  39. parochiality
    • 2007 November 18, Jim Holt, “Mind of a Rock”, New York Times:
      But even if it proves a cul-de-sac in the quest to understand consciousness, it might still help rouse us from a certain parochiality in our cosmic outlook.
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  40. percebes
    • 2007 November 18, Mimi Sheraton, “Markets as Both Feast and Spectacle”, New York Times:
      Many markets serve some of the deep sea's most tantalizing treasures like the briny barnacles percebes at La Boqueria in Barcelona , also the spot to taste Jabugo ham, the world's best air-cured pork.
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  41. pogasca
    • 2007 November 18, Mimi Sheraton, “Markets as Both Feast and Spectacle”, New York Times:
      Budapest 's Central Market Hall offers de facto crash courses in the wonders of paprika, peppered pork and the soothing biscuits called pogasca.
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  42. postbariatric
    • 2007 November 18, Stephen J. Dubner And Steven D. Levitt, “The Stomach-Surgery Conundrum”, New York Times:
      From an economic standpoint, research suggests that the operation can pay for itself within a few years because a postbariatric patient now requires less medical care and fewer prescriptions .
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  43. postmarathon
    • 2007 November 18, “Letters to the Editor”, New York Times:
      Re After Completing Marathon, a Runner Dies in His Home, Nov. 7: Dr. Jeffrey Moses, in commenting upon the postmarathon death of Dr. Matthew P. Hardy, said: When you exercise, your blood gets stickier.
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  44. precharge
    • 2007 November 18, Raymond Bonner, “The Tories Find Their Inner Liberal”, New York Times:
      The view is weve fought two wars for liberty, and well be damned if were going to give it up now, she said, adding that she personally favors extending precharge detention to 90 days.
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  45. ratless
  46. refight
    • 2007 November 18, Frank Rich, “What That Regan Woman Knows”, New York Times:
      Journalists, like generals, love to refight the last war, so the unavailability of millions of Hillary Clintons papers has received all the coverage the Giuliani campaign has been spared.
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  47. reservationists
    • 2007 November 18, Sean Wilsey, “The Food of Love”, New York Times:
      Everyone at the restaurant, from the reservationists to the coffee server, calls everyone else chef, as an equalizer, a sign of respect for peoples mtiers and a great way to get out of learning hundreds of co-workers names.
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  48. retronymy
    • 2007 November 18, William Safire, “Retronymy”, New York Times:
      When we all first began exploring the wonders of retronymy decades ago, the image of the comedian Sid Caesar appeared on the tiny TV screen, playing an anachronistic doughboy in uniform and tin helmet celebrating the Armistice, shouting in glee, World War I is over!
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  49. sabrelike
    • 2007 November 18, Mimi Sheraton, “Markets as Both Feast and Spectacle”, New York Times:
      ABOUT 15 years ago I witnessed a 500-pound bluefin flown in from Montauk fetch $50,000 wholesale and watched it being cut with a lengthy sabrelike steel blade into tapering vertical quarters.
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  50. subcommunity
    • 2007 November 18, “The Encyclopedists Lair”, New York Times:
      I wanted a brighter flashlight and discovered a subcommunity of flashlight people online, and found that this is the ultimate.
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  51. sunshiney
    • 2007 November 18, Virginia Heffernan, “Sweeping the Clouds Away”, New York Times:
      (Bert, too, is described as grouchy; none of the characters, in fact, is especially sunshiney except maybe Ernie, who also seems slow.)
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  52. surferish
    • 2007 November 18, Richard Sandomir, “Funnyman, Who Art Thou?”, New York Times:
      With Keanu, I close off the back of my throat, and its wispy in the middle, but on the ends of it, its tighter, and I add the surferish sound.
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  53. technicolor
    • 2007 November 18, Jim Holt, “Mind of a Rock”, New York Times:
      How could the electrochemical processes in the lump of gray matter that is our brain give rise to or, even more mysteriously, be the dazzling technicolor play of consciousness, with its transports of joy, its stabs of anguish and its stretches of mild contentment alternating with boredom?
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  54. tortes
    • 2007 November 18, Christine Muhlke, “The Sweet Hereafter”, New York Times:
      And then there are the tortes, fools, charlotte russes and other sweets that have gone the way of the dessert trolley.
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  55. trazodone
    • 2007 November 18, Fernanda Santos, “Sergeant Fled Army, but Not the War in His Head”, New York Times:
      He stayed for two weeks at a psychiatric ward at Samaritan Medical Center in Watertown, and was prescribed a cocktail of drugs Zoloft and trazodone for depression, and Ambien to help him sleep.
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  56. truckman
    • 2007 November 18, Thomas Mallon, “Washingtonienne”, New York Times:
      The truckman, the trash man and the policemen on the block may call me Alice, but you may not.
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  57. turfites
    • 2007 November 18, John Freeman Gill, “The Blue-Collar Thoroughbred”, New York Times:
      Its great that little turfites like myself can enjoy the feeling of ownership without putting too much into it.
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  58. ultraexpensive
    • 2007 November 18, Antoinette Martin, “Coming Soon: Affordable Views”, New York Times:
      They are not going to be ultraexpensive, either: the Hudson Bay Club here, which has sales opening in January, plans to ask under $300,000 for one-bedroom units, and start in the mid-$300,000s for two- or three-bedroom condos.
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  59. ultrasonographer
    • 2007 November 18, Jake Mooney, “Where Everybody Really Did Know His Name”, New York Times:
      There are professionals, there are homeless people a lot of people come in here, says Bill Thomas, a medical ultrasonographer. Mr. Thomas, who is black, says the Japanese-born bartender, Shuhei Fujii, who has a long ponytail and wears an Orange County Choppers shirt, taught him how to do glass-blowing.
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  60. unresentful
    • 2007 November 18, Christine Muhlke, “The Sweet Hereafter”, New York Times:
      Part recipe sleuth, part culinary archaeologist, Monaghan who, in her 50s, is elegant and slim in a way that makes you wonder if she still has any unresentful female friends, or at least ones who dont play tennis pored through the vast cookbook collections of Bonnie Slotnick and George Lang, bought wacky old cookbooks in Europe and tracked down former restaurant managers, assistants to now-deceased chefs and 90-year-old Beverly Hills housekeepers who might, say, remember that heavenly chocolate cake from Pupis Bakery on the Sunset Strip.
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  61. unslaked
    • 2007 November 18, Lloyd Grove, “Clinton & Clinton”, New York Times:
      And unlike some of the subjects of Smiths earlier books Jack and Jackie Kennedy, Princess Diana the Clintons are not only alive and kicking, their passion for power remains unslaked.
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  62. unstitched
    • 2007 November 18, Trymaine Lee, “A Symbol of Activism Is at Center of Court Dispute”, New York Times:
      When racially charged killings in the 1980s unstitched already flimsy race relations in the city, the Slave Theater grew to be more than just a movie house, it became a symbol and center of black activism.
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  63. unworked
    • 2007 November 18, Rich Cohen, “Wiseguys”, New York Times:
      These bare, unworked facts evoke a scene right out of Hemingway, the overcoated wiseguy with the heater, the boy and the cook cowering in the kitchen (Another bright boy.
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  64. viably
    • 2007 November 18, Glen Duncan, “Young Man Behaving Badly”, New York Times:
      In two brief years of beyond-means living, I went from being more or less viably broke to being tremblingly, authentically in debt.
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  65. vocationally
    • 2007 November 18, Bob Morris, “Yes, Thank You”, New York Times:
      The word etiquette comes from the French for ticket, and Emily Posts popularity 85 years ago came at a time when a middle class was emerging in this country, and people needed manners tutorials to advance vocationally and socially.
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  66. weissbier
    • 2007 November 18, Mimi Sheraton, “Markets as Both Feast and Spectacle”, New York Times:
      Bordered by shops selling meat, fresh, smoked and pickled fish, this is a nosher's haven with many a schnell imbiss, or quick snack stand, for the hot liver pt, leberkse and morning weisswurst washed down with potent, lemon-sparked Munich weissbier.
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  67. weisswurst
    • 2007 November 18, Mimi Sheraton, “Markets as Both Feast and Spectacle”, New York Times:
      Bordered by shops selling meat, fresh, smoked and pickled fish, this is a nosher's haven with many a schnell imbiss, or quick snack stand, for the hot liver pt, leberkse and morning weisswurst washed down with potent, lemon-sparked Munich weissbier.
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  68. wenge
    • 2007 November 18, Guy Trebay, “In Luxurious Detail”, New York Times:
      Somehow the lavish deployment of wenge wood has failed to differentiate the boxy furniture at, say, Armani Casa from that at Crate & Barrel.
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Sequestered[edit]

  1. bigleaf
  2. cookievore: nonce
    • 2007 November 18, Virginia Heffernan, “Sweeping the Clouds Away”, New York Times:
      As for Cookie Monster, he can be seen in the old-school episodes in his former inglorious incarnation: a blue, googly-eyed cookievore with a signature gobble (om nom nom nom).
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  3. russes *
    • 2007 November 18, Christine Muhlke, “The Sweet Hereafter”, New York Times:
      And then there are the tortes, fools, charlotte russes and other sweets that have gone the way of the dessert trolley.
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  4. longnose
    • 2007 November 18, Rich Cohen, “Wiseguys”, New York Times:
      My favorites are the gangsters who turn up all alone in some random nowhere, like an exotic longnose butterflyfish found in a swamp in, say, Hannibal, Mo. Joseph Bonanno, a k a Joe Bananas, lived at 1847 East Elm Street in Tucson and was said to have a business interest in the Grande Cheese Company of Fond du Lac, Wis. Luigi Fratto (5-foot-3 1/2, 173 pounds; heavy build and wears glasses) lived at 115 Caulder Avenue in Des Moines and was wonderfully described as the most influential member of the Mafia in the state of Iowa.
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  5. spinned = error for spun in a reader's letter
    • 2007 November 18, “Harold Robbins, Pioneer”, New York Times:
      We lolled about the plage while Robbins spinned laughably absurd lies about his personal history easily checked and boasted that he was a more popular (and better) writer than Shakespeare.
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