User:Visviva/NYT 20080106

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to: navigation, search
← Previous (2008-01-05) Words harvested from the New York Times, 2008-01-06
  • List status: open
→ Next (2008-01-07)

This is a list of lowercase non-hyphenated single words found in the 2008-01-06 issue of the New York Times which did not have English entries in the English Wiktionary when this list was created (2009-03-03).

[ see all NYT pages ] - [ see all tracking lists ]

180292 tokens ‧ 131935 valid lowercase tokens ‧ 13243 types ‧ 54 (~ 0.408%) words before cleaning ‧ 

2008-01-06[edit]

  1. algebrists
    • 2008 January 6, Noam Cohen, “Borges and the Foreseeable Future”, New York Times:
      It is conjectured that this ‘brave new world’ is the work of a secret society of astronomers, biologists, engineers, metaphysicians, poets, chemists, algebrists, moralists, painters, geometers, ... guided and directed by some shadowy man of genius.
      add
  2. barside
    • 2008 January 6, Richard Sandomir, “Just for Men Just Right for Former Stars”, New York Times:
      It was the Just for Men advertisement with Keith Hernandez and Walt Frazier as barside analysts of Miss Hottie’s brush-off of poor Mr. Graybeard.
      add
  3. blissworld
    • 2008 January 6, Ellen Tien, “Cosmetic Imperatives”, New York Times:
      The Youth As We Know It cream by Bliss puts 10 anti-aging ingredients in one jar ($79 at Blissworld.com ); its success has led to a complete Youth collection of face products ($28 to $75, available Jan. 15 at blissworld
      add
  4. bodywide
    • 2008 January 6, “Letters to the Editor”, New York Times:
      Lidocaine is a local anesthetic and not a systemic pain reliever, like acetaminophen, with bodywide effects.
      add
  5. calisthenicslike
    • 2008 January 6, Stephen Holden, “A Mystery Tour More Menacing Than Magical”, New York Times:
      The half-naked men face a grim herd of soldiers executing a mechanical calisthenicslike war dance that is all right angles, to a grinding metallic soundtrack punctuated with stomping cha-cha-chas.
      add
  6. chatless
    • 2008 January 6, Maureen Dowd, “Voting for a Smile”, New York Times:
      At a hangar in Nashua, with chatty Bill and chatless Chelsea, Hillary tried to purloin more of the Obama message.
      add
  7. conflictual
    • 2008 January 6, Fouad Ajami, “The Clash”, New York Times:
      The 20th-century conflict between liberal democracy and Marxist-Leninism is only a fleeting and superficial historical phenomenon compared to the continuing and deeply conflictual relation between Islam and Christianity.”
      add
  8. contradictorily
    • 2008 January 6, Frank Rich, “They Didn’t Stop Thinking About Tomorrow”, New York Times:
      Only a week ago, Mr. Huckabee was literally laughed at by reporters for his “Howard Dean meltdown” at a press conference where he contradictorily exhibited and then disowned an attack ad on Mr. Romney.
      add
  9. corded
    • 2008 January 6, Tracie Rozhon, “A Retreat for Nature Lovers”, New York Times:
      William H. Grover, often referred to as the dean of Centerbrook Architects, and another principal at the firm, Charles G. Mueller, were outfitted for the freezing conditions: Mr. Grover had strapped on his YakTrax — corded spikes that bite into the ice — and Mr. Mueller had donned what looked like a hand-knit hat that came down over his ears. Mr. Mueller waved his sketch pad in salute.
      add
  10. countershots
  11. cybersmarts
    • 2008 January 6, Holland Cotter, “Video Art Thinks Big: That’s Showbiz”, New York Times:
      At present it is shaped by a combination of pop fantasy, ingrained cybersmarts, neo-tribalism and an angst-free take on contemporary life that marks an attention-deficient Internet culture.
      add
  12. deferentialisms
    • 2008 January 6, William Safire, “Long Pole in the Tent”, New York Times:
      I chastised the vice president last year in this space about his habit of using ostentatious deferentialisms, if I say so myself.
      add
  13. eschatologies
    • 2008 January 6, Eric Ormsby, “The Lost Garden”, New York Times:
      In his preface, he urges us “to resist the eschatologies of the cultural and political simplifiers”; yet, despite his best intentions, the story he tells remains one of a long, drawn-out “clash of civilizations,” lasting nearly half a millennium.
      add
  14. explorable
    • 2008 January 6, Dave Itzkoff, “I’ve Been in That Club, Just Not in Real Life”, New York Times:
      Not every business and storefront is represented, but several landmarks are there, from the neon-lighted exterior of Katz’s Delicatessen (where I could press my digital nose against its salami-stocked windows, though I couldn’t go inside) to a fully explorable model of the club Max Fish, complete with a framed photograph of Julio Iglesias hanging above the bar, a “Pirates of the Caribbean” pinball machine and familiar messages scrawled on the bathroom wall.
      add
  15. flashaholism
    • 2008 January 6, Virginia Heffernan, “An Interface of One’s Own”, New York Times:
      LET THERE BE LIGHT : For fans of fanaticism, here’s an Internet pathology worth cultivating: flashaholism.
      add
  16. footwell
    • 2008 January 6, Laurence M. Paul, “Racing Toward the Sun”, New York Times:
      This may be a consequence of Porsche’s moving the bass speaker unit to the passenger footwell to make room for the convertible top.
      add
  17. gallinules
    • 2008 January 6, Hilary Howard, “Datebook”, New York Times:
      Birds you’re likely to see include boat-billed herons, northern jacanas, purple gallinules, mottled owls and white ibises, above.
      add
  18. girlfriendly
    • 2008 January 6, Kelefa Sanneh, “The Anticipated, the Indie and the Overlooked”, New York Times:
      It’s called ... or rather, it’s about ... see, it describes ... well, let’s just say it’s about a girlfriend who suspects her boyfriend of infidelity, and who proposes to conduct an investigation before committing herself to any girlfriendly activity.
      add
  19. gladdest
    • 2008 January 6, Gary J. Bass, “Independence Daze”, New York Times:
      Following the Paris peace conference in 1919, Woodrow Wilson’s foreign policy adviser, Col. Edward M. House, reflected: “It was the gladdest and yet, in some ways, the maddest movement in history.
      add
  20. graybacks
    • 2008 January 6, Stephen Kotkin, “The Deluge Before the Dollar”, New York Times:
      By contrast, the Confederacy’s wartime graybacks failed, lacking the backing of a strong central government.
      add
  21. hopemongers
    • 2008 January 6, Maureen Dowd, “Voting for a Smile”, New York Times:
      It was understandable that Hillary’s “Golden Girls” acolytes would freak out when they saw the throngs of young Obama hopemongers swarming the caucuses.
      add
  22. jinns
    • 2008 January 6, William Dalrymple, “Eat Your Heart Out, Homer”, New York Times:
      Any factual backbone the story might once have had was through the centuries overtaken by innumerable subplots and a cast of dragons, giants, jinns, simurgh, sorcerers, princesses and, if not flying carpets, then at least flying urns, the preferred mode of travel for the tale’s magicians.
      add
  23. milelong
    • 2008 January 6, C. J. Hughes, “Galleries and High-Line Views”, New York Times:
      It’s in the process of being transformed into a milelong 4.8-acre park, complete with native grasses — flora not all that dissimilar to what’s sprouted there since the final train trip in 1980.
      add
  24. miscreancy
    • 2008 January 6, Dave Itzkoff, “I’ve Been in That Club, Just Not in Real Life”, New York Times:
      Like their flesh-and-blood counterparts, the computer-generated residents of VLES (which opened to the public last week) are free to walk a familiar gritty strip between Houston and Rivington Streets, befriend one another, watch music videos, hang out at rock shows, form their own bands and get into as much after-hours miscreancy as the Web site’s programmers will allow.
      add
  25. noncontradictory
    • 2008 January 6, Tariq Ramadan, “Reading the Koran”, New York Times:
      The stories of Eve and Adam, or of Moses, are repeated several times over with differing though noncontradictory elements: the task of human intelligence is to recompose the narrative structure, to bring together all the elements, allowing us to grasp the facts.
      add
  26. nonshooting
  27. outperformers
    • 2008 January 6, Vivian Marino, “A Defensive Strategy for REIT Investors”, New York Times:
      “They tend to be the outperformers when times are really good and underperformers when things turn south,” he said.
      add
  28. overperform
    • 2008 January 6, Charles Mcgrath, “On Double Secret Probation”, New York Times:
      And yet, while fraternity brothers typically underperform academically — racking up worse G.P.A.’s than the rest of the student body — the sisters overperform, and usually do better.
      add
  29. pennywise
  30. phragmites
    • 2008 January 6, Tracie Rozhon, “A Retreat for Nature Lovers”, New York Times:
      “If the phragmites are cut down,” Mr. Grover said, “you could put in a walk to the dock.”
      add
  31. pistou
    • 2008 January 6, “Before Act I”, New York Times:
      Its menu lists about eight appetizers and eight entrees, among them Spanish mackerel salad, and wild striped bass in a winter pistou.
      add
  32. plasmic
    • 2008 January 6, James Gleick, “Keeping It Real”, New York Times:
      There’s no ‘mystical plasmic presence,’ no ‘aura’ around it.”
      add
  33. powderhound
  34. pretechnological
    • 2008 January 6, Noam Cohen, “Borges and the Foreseeable Future”, New York Times:
      He frequently set his stories in a pretechnological past and was easily enthralled by the authority of ancient texts.
      add
  35. recoin
  36. shakable
    • 2008 January 6, Virginia Heffernan, “An Interface of One’s Own”, New York Times:
      The Web is filled with Etch A Sketch art, preserved as it could never be on the original shakable and protean palette.
      add
  37. shebeens
    • 2008 January 6, “Before Act I”, New York Times:
      This warm little bar and restaurant, modeled after the informal bars known as shebeens, may be New York’s only South African restaurant.
      add
  38. simurgh *
    • 2008 January 6, William Dalrymple, “Eat Your Heart Out, Homer”, New York Times:
      Any factual backbone the story might once have had was through the centuries overtaken by innumerable subplots and a cast of dragons, giants, jinns, simurgh, sorcerers, princesses and, if not flying carpets, then at least flying urns, the preferred mode of travel for the tale’s magicians.
      add
  39. sufis
    • 2008 January 6, William Dalrymple, “Eat Your Heart Out, Homer”, New York Times:
      To read “The Adventures of Amir Hamza” is to come as close as is now possible to the world of the Mughal campfire — those night gatherings of soldiers, sufis, musicians and hangers-on that one sees illustrated in Mughal miniatures, a storyteller beginning his tale in a clearing of a forest as the embers of the blaze glow red and the eager faces crowd around.
      add
  40. swaggeringly
    • 2008 January 6, Maureen Dowd, “Voting for a Smile”, New York Times:
      The Bushes always self-consciously and swaggeringly put themselves “on the American side,” as Poppy used to say, implying that their rivals were somehow less American.
      add
  41. trinkety
    • 2008 January 6, Virginia Heffernan, “An Interface of One’s Own”, New York Times:
      Goodbye to Word’s prim rulers, its officious yardsticks, its self-serious formatting toolbar with cryptic abbreviations (ComicSansMS?) and trinkety icons.
      add
  42. twerpy
    • 2008 January 6, Virginia Heffernan, “An Interface of One’s Own”, New York Times:
      Unlike so many twerpy little applications, the Scrivener icon eschews that ubiquitous Curaçao blue.
      add
  43. ultracontemporary
    • 2008 January 6, Robin Pogrebin, “Classic Revival”, New York Times:
      The 2,000 examples range from the historic to the ultracontemporary, from stately to quirky, ornate to austere.
      add
  44. underseen
    • 2008 January 6, “Art”, New York Times:
      But New York City being the resource it is, there’s no need to depend on the Met alone for underseen art, as “A CAMEROON WORLD: ART AND ARTIFACTS FROM THE MARSHALL AND CAROLINE MOUNT COLLECTION” at the Queensborough Community College Art Gallery confirms.
      add
  45. understocked
    • 2008 January 6, Jeffrey Goldberg, “Seeds of Hate”, New York Times:
      One day in Damascus not long ago, I visited the understocked gift shop of the Sheraton Hotel, looking for something to read.
      add
  46. unforgetting
    • 2008 January 6, Noam Cohen, “Borges and the Foreseeable Future”, New York Times:
      With their infinite libraries and unforgetting men, collaborative encyclopedias and virtual worlds conjured up from the printed page and portals that watch over the entire planet, these stories (along with a few others like “The Aleph”) have become a canon for those at the intersection of new technology and literature.
      add
  47. uphuthu
    • 2008 January 6, “Before Act I”, New York Times:
      The extensive menu includes unfamiliar dishes like uphuthu, a ground corn porridge with marinated tomatoes and onions, sautéed chicken livers peri-peri, a spicy dish of Portuguese origin.
      add

Sequestered[edit]