User:Visviva/NYT 20080120

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This is a list of lowercase non-hyphenated single words found in the 2008-01-20 issue of the New York Times which did not have English entries in the English Wiktionary when this list was created (2009-03-03).

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172664 tokens ‧ 126583 valid lowercase tokens ‧ 12561 types ‧ 55 (~ 0.438%) words before cleaning ‧ 

2008-01-20[edit]

  1. anticouture
    • 2008 January 20, Dennis Lim, “Blurring Reality’s Edge in Fluid China”, New York Times:
      While shooting “Still Life” he made a companion piece, “Dong,” a documentary on a painter and his subjects, demolition laborers in Fengjie and sex workers in Bangkok. Mr. Jia’s latest feature, an essay-film called “Useless” that screened in the New York Film Festival last fall, compares the manufacture of clothing at a factory, a high-concept anticouture designer and a backwater tailor shop.
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  2. apartmentlike
  3. blueswoman
    • 2008 January 20, Jon Pareles, “Rock Cantankerousness and Other Moods”, New York Times:
      She finds it in songs as initially diverse as “New York, New York,” Joni Mitchell ’s “Blue,” the blueswoman Jessie Mae Hemphill’s “Lord, Help the Poor and Needy” and her own “Metal Heart.”
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  4. candlemaker
    • 2008 January 20, Sam Roberts, “Mobsters, Poets and the Trial of a Whale”, New York Times:
      Graham Burnett, a history professor at Princeton, details an arcane 1818 legal battle that began when Samuel Judd, a New York candlemaker and oil merchant, refused to pay for state inspection of three casks of spermaceti oil — insisting that it was not fish oil, subject to state certification, but whale oil.
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  5. canzoni *
    • 2008 January 20, Dan Chiasson, “Alpha Poet”, New York Times:
      Louis Zukofsky (1904-78) is the author of an enormous poem called simply “A,” an 800-plus-page work written over the course of more than 50 years in a mélange of styles and forms, from Poundian free verse to Italian canzoni.
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  6. cobblestoned
    • 2008 January 20, Josh Barbanel, “Outside the Box”, New York Times:
      He found the site of a 100-foot-wide garage on cobblestoned Bond Street and bought out another developer for $26 million who, he said, wanted to build 48 apartments on the site.
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  7. cruiseport
    • 2008 January 20, Michelle Higgins, “No Room at the Lot and Late at the Gate”, New York Times:
      And ParkSleepFly.com offers parking and hotel packages at airport hotels in the United States , Europe and Canada ; its cruiseport feature specializes in deals for popular cruise departure cities in the United States, as well as Toronto .
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  8. daisylike
    • 2008 January 20, A. O. Scott, “New Wave on the Black Sea”, New York Times:
      As it happened, Cristian Mungiu’s Palme d’Or arrived punctually on the 50th anniversary of the first Romanian Palme, awarded in 1957 to Ion Popescu-Gopo’s “Short History,” a charming, wordless animated short in which human evolution and industrial development culminate in the planting of large daisylike flowers on distant planets.
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  9. deglorification
  10. djeli
    • 2008 January 20, Nancy Kline, “From Slavery to Freedom”, New York Times:
      During her waning years, she testifies against slavery and writes her autobiography, becoming what her people called a djeli, a storyteller entrusted with the village’s ancestral tales.
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  11. elations
    • 2008 January 20, Dan Chiasson, “Alpha Poet”, New York Times:
      But “A” is not about anything as simple as “language” or “life”: it is a poem about working on “A” — about the daily elations and impediments of an artist who sought, over the course of decades, to make something really hard really good.
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  12. eps
  13. flickerings
    • 2008 January 20, Francine Prose, “Extra Noir”, New York Times:
      As Kennedy charts Alfie’s erratic progress, monitoring the flickerings of his will to live, the book’s bright spots and most rewarding bits, closest to its heart, are the places where she displays her admirable ability to imagine a character from within.
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  14. grungily
    • 2008 January 20, Dennis Lim, “Blurring Reality’s Edge in Fluid China”, New York Times:
      Mr. Jia is part of the sixth generation of Chinese filmmakers, which emerged in the 1990s with grungily realistic portrayals of contemporary China that stood apart from the historical epics that came before.
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  15. hipoisie
    • 2008 January 20, R J Smith, “They’ve Got Those Mekong Blues Again”, New York Times:
      At a recent show in the Echo Park neighborhood here, the male members were downright goofy, but Ms. Chhom, singing mostly in Khmer and dressed in shimmering Cambodian silk garments she designs herself, looked like old-school royalty, a queen before the hipoisie.
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  16. hypnotizer
    • 2008 January 20, George Prochnik, “Freud’s Family Tree”, New York Times:
      We also encounter Jean-Martin Charcot, Freud’s first mentor in Paris, who charted the stages of hysteria and proposed that the power of hypnosis depended upon the abnormal nervous condition of the hypnotized, not the magus-like potency of the hypnotizer.
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  17. ignorer *
    • 2008 January 20, Lauren Fox, “Political Football”, New York Times:
      THESE days it seems to me, a passionate ignorer of football, that all anyone can talk about around here are the Green Bay Packers.
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  18. jammees
    • 2008 January 20, David Kirby, “Pas de Deux”, New York Times:
      Film lovers know him for the short story that became Michelangelo Antonioni ’s “Blow-Up,” but Cortázar also wrote a fanciful short story, “The Southern Thruway,” about a traffic jam on an autoroute so congested that the jammees organize their own society.
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  19. katiev
    • 2008 January 20, David Shaftel, “Little Cambodia, Growing Still Littler”, New York Times:
      Over katiev, a spicy Cambodian noodle soup made with beef, shrimp and fish balls, they told stories about escaping from Khmer Rouge soldiers in Cambodia as they fled to refugee camps in Thailand.
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  20. landlock
    • 2008 January 20, Virginia Heffernan, “Art in the Age of Franchising”, New York Times:
      “Friday Night Lights,” the NBC series about a high-school football team, is a luminous slow dance set in the smoldering landlock of fictional Dillon, Tex. Like a late-life romance, it induces both grief and euphoria and casts a kind of high-lonesome bluegrass spell.
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  21. lipidologist
    • 2008 January 20, “Margo Crespin, Joshua Rosenbaum”, New York Times:
      Her father is an endocrinologist and lipidologist in St. Louis and an associate professor of clinical medicine at Washington University in St. Louis.
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  22. maghnaeh
    • 2008 January 20, Nazila Fathi, “Radical Left, Iran’s Last Legal Dissidents, Until Now”, New York Times:
      The 22-year-old Radical Marxists member said that she had rejected Iran’s laws against women when she was 7 and had to wear the Islamic hood known as a maghnaeh to cover her hair for the first time.
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  23. masstige
    • 2008 January 20, Michael Barbaro, “Thinking Twice About That $400 Handbag”, New York Times:
      The phenomenon earned many nicknames — mass affluence, new luxury, masstige — and was best summarized by the retail experts Michael J. Silverstein and Neil Fiske in their 2003 book, “Trading Up: The New American Luxury.”
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  24. megahomes
    • 2008 January 20, Harry Hurt Iii, “Who Needs a 401(k)? I’d Rather Have a Castle”, New York Times:
      But as Mr. McGinn notes, “Unlike the robber baron-era mansions, modern-day megahomes don’t feature dozens of bedrooms or entirely new kinds of rooms — they mostly just take the rooms you’d find in a normal house and make them really, really big.”
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  25. mellotron
    • 2008 January 20, Jon Pareles, “Rock Cantankerousness and Other Moods”, New York Times:
      At first Black Mountain’s carefully maintained vintage early-1970s sound — the electric organ, the fuzz-tone guitar, the mellotron, the weedy vocals — makes its album “In the Future” (Jagjaguwar) sound like a genre exercise or a hipster parody.
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  26. mimolette
    • 2008 January 20, Hilary Howard, “Hilton’s New Presence in Old Prague”, New York Times:
      Modeled on Mr. Ramsay’s London establishment of the same name, its menu includes signature tasting dishes like marinated roasted pumpkin risotto with wild mushrooms and mimolette cheese (à la carte prices for main dishes start at 550 korunas, about $30.50 at 18 korunas to the dollar). Mr. Ramsay also had a hand in creating the room service menu.
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  27. miswielding
    • 2008 January 20, William Logan, “Living With Ghosts”, New York Times:
      The other Cromwell, that strange muse of Wyatt and master of last things: it makes a fine edge — wisdom so near miswielding power.
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  28. multirack
    • 2008 January 20, “Matzos, Just One Flavor of the Lower East Side”, New York Times:
      (Jan. 13), Vanessa Gruen of the Municipal Art Society makes an excellent point that a business improvement district should not spend millions on a multirack program “and then find that the single racks can set themselves up right next to them.”
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  29. multithemed
    • 2008 January 20, Hilary Howard, “Not a Rhodes Scholar? Oxford Is Still in Reach”, New York Times:
      Live out your Rhodes Scholar fantasy this spring with Insider’s Oxford, a new program offered by the Department of Continuing Education at Oxford University , which is based on the popular, multithemed summer program Oxford Experience.
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  30. nonrental
    • 2008 January 20, Vivian S. Toy, “Co-ops Reap Unexpected Bonanza”, New York Times:
      They also note that while the new law will have the biggest impact in New York City, where co-ops make up 75 percent of the nonrental apartment stock, other cities that have co-ops, like Chicago and Los Angeles , will also benefit.
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  31. patriciate
    • 2008 January 20, Jacob Heilbrunn, “Consent and Advise”, New York Times:
      As Bumiller astutely notes, both Bush and Rice are the products of American elites: Bush is the descendant of Northeastern WASPs, and Rice comes from the Southern black patriciate.
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  32. polyphonous
    • 2008 January 20, George Prochnik, “Freud’s Family Tree”, New York Times:
      Instead, he argues, we should look to the rich, polyphonous context that gave birth to and was influenced by the analytic enterprise: “the culture of Kant; the assumptions of Geisteswissenschaft and a European classical education,” along with “evolutionary biology, positivism and Newtonian physics.”
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  33. postliterate
    • 2008 January 20, David Kirby, “Pas de Deux”, New York Times:
      Those who bemoan the self-absorption of the postliterate generation will be happy to know that before the self-indulgent, amateurish blog there was the self-indulgent, amateurish log.
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  34. pretraining
    • 2008 January 20, Joseph P. Fried, “A Helping Hand in Technical Training”, New York Times:
      He gained admission to the course by successfully completing this pretraining path, without having to take the hospital’s test again.
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  35. reinstill
    • 2008 January 20, Roger Lowenstein, “The Education of Ben Bernanke”, New York Times:
      Despite having written extensively on how to deal with such episodes, Bernanke has thus far been unable to reinstill a sense of confidence.
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  36. retranslation
    • 2008 January 20, Sam Roberts, “Mobsters, Poets and the Trial of a Whale”, New York Times:
      In his introduction, the poet John Hollander writes that for poets, New York “is a great poem itself, in an unwritten tongue that constantly needs retranslation into a poet’s individual language.”
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  37. scrambly
    • 2008 January 20, Jeff Z. Klein And Lew Serviss, “One Team’s Discard, Another Team’s Ace”, New York Times:
      “When we’re up a goal or two and things are getting a little scrambly, he finds a way to settle it down.”
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  38. slightingly
    • 2008 January 20, William Safire, “Fired Up”, New York Times:
      The phrase fired up preceded the ignition of the first internal-combustion engine; the novelist Jane Austen wrote as early as 1798: “If I were to hear anybody speak slightingly of you, I should fire up in a moment.”
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  39. statemate
  40. superlow
    • 2008 January 20, “The Real Price of Fakes”, New York Times:
      Like others who talk about the three Ps — price, place and packaging — the magazine’s editors warn that a superlow price should be the first clue.
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  41. turbos
    • 2008 January 20, Tim Moran, “BMW Rethinks the V-8 Engine”, New York Times:
      Wieland Bruch, a BMW spokesman, said the new engine had a closer coupling of the turbos that reduced pressure losses on both the intake and exhaust sides and offered larger cross sections over a shorter run for easier air flow than conventional side turbo placement.
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  42. unredeemable
    • 2008 January 20, Matt Bai, “South Poll”, New York Times:
      It has been in vogue throughout the Bush years for Democrats to assert that the South is unredeemable and politically unnecessary.
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  43. wattleseed
    • 2008 January 20, “Rescued by Newcomers”, New York Times:
      Some distance from downtown places honoring the Antipodes, this newcomer features Australian ales and wines and a pub menu with items like crispy whole barramundi served with forest anise, Asian slaw and green tea jasmine rice; kangaroo satays on potato wedges with wattleseed yogurt and riberry glaze; and kangaroo filet mignon.
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  44. wharrs
    • 2008 January 20, William Logan, “Living With Ghosts”, New York Times:
      I think of the headsman balancing that extraordinary axe for a long instant without breaking the skin; then the engine cuts its ascending outline on the air, wharrs its velocity, dreadful, perhaps merciful.
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Sequestered[edit]