User:Visviva/NYT 20080127

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This is a list of lowercase non-hyphenated single words found in the 2008-01-27 issue of the New York Times which did not have English entries in the English Wiktionary when this list was created (2009-03-03).

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167898 tokens ‧ 123291 valid lowercase tokens ‧ 12601 types ‧ 63 (~ 0.5%) words before cleaning ‧ 

2008-01-27[edit]

  1. antitrain
  2. baseballwide
    • 2008 January 27, Alan Schwarz, “A Voice of Skepticism on the Impact of Steroids”, New York Times:
      Walker contends that popular measures often used to demonstrate the baseballwide effects of so-called performance-enhancing drugs — like the rise in home runs per game and overall runs per game — are the wrong place to look.
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  3. beertopia
    • 2008 January 27, Brooke Hauser, “Bone-Dry Days at the No-Beer Tavern”, New York Times:
      Construction was complete, down to the long, wooden tables where Justin Philips, who owns the bar with his wife, Tricia, envisions his customers discussing the merits of a rich Schlenkerla Urbock versus a refreshing Reissdorf Kölsch in his version of a beertopia.
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  4. bibimbop
    • 2008 January 27, ZoWolff, “Know-It-Alls on a Riff”, New York Times:
      Back in Morningside Heights, they feasted on dumplings and bibimbop at the Mill Korean Restaurant, an old favorite.
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  5. blogospheric
    • 2008 January 27, Chris Suellentrop, “The Isolationist”, New York Times:
      By the time he’s done quoting, in blogospheric fashion, the wisdom of his earlier works (he cites “A Republic, Not an Empire,” “State of Emergency” and “Where the Right Went Wrong” in the first 33 pages alone), including articles in political journals like The American Conservative and The National Interest, “Day of Reckoning” has begun to feel like a cross between a greatest-hits anthology and “The Patrick J. Buchanan Reader.”
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  6. castful
    • 2008 January 27, Sarah Lyall, “To Boldly Go Where Shakespeare Calls”, New York Times:
      In a recent interview Mr. Stewart spoke happily, even sentimentally, about his Enterprise-commanding days, which left him with a castful of close friends and an unexpected appreciation for the importance of “Star Trek” in American culture.
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  7. churchly
    • 2008 January 27, Charles Mcgrath, “Il Miglior Fabbro”, New York Times:
      Eliot is now an almost churchly figure in our cultural imagination, the prelate of modernism, while Pound, if we bother to think of him at all, is remembered mostly as an embarrassment — a crank, a Fascist and anti-Semite confined to an asylum.
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  8. climactically
    • 2008 January 27, Troy Patterson, “Your Place or Mine”, New York Times:
      When Ike thinks about why he loves New York, he muses on its “sense of possibility” and the ducks in Central Park and all that, but, climactically, he thinks of being another face in the crowd: “He loves the liberating feeling that this city doesn’t seem to give a damn about him and never did.”
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  9. cocktaileries
    • 2008 January 27, Jonathan Miles, “The Old Man Returns”, New York Times:
      Ms. Schneider, along with Andrew Boggs, 31, is an owner of Huckleberry Bar, which opened in October on Grand Street in Williamsburg — one of a sudden burst of cocktaileries in beer-proud Brooklyn.
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  10. coinckidincks
    • 2008 January 27, Troy Patterson, “Your Place or Mine”, New York Times:
      A mosaic depicting the love lives and housing destinies of 10 major characters, the novel is fitted together with cutesy coinckidincks.
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  11. conjurings
    • 2008 January 27, Daphne Merkin, “How It’s Couched”, New York Times:
      Psychotherapy, much like the conjurings of the imagination, has always required a degree of blind faith — what Samuel Coleridge characterized as a “willing suspension of disbelief.”
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  12. countermovements
    • 2008 January 27, Parag Khanna, “Waving Goodbye to Hegemony”, New York Times:
      America’s unipolar moment has inspired diplomatic and financial countermovements to block American bullying and construct an alternate world order.
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  13. counterslogan
    • 2008 January 27, William Safire, “Change Machine”, New York Times:
      His rallying cry inspired the partisan crowd, but Truman supporters reminded voters of Lincoln’s admonition when running for re-election in 1864 — not to “swap horses while crossing the river” — which could not be overcome by the Republican countersloganChange horses or drown!”
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  14. cybermagic
  15. demises
    • 2008 January 27, Terrence Rafferty, “Screams in Asia Echo in Hollywood”, New York Times:
      By reputation ghosts are homebodies, sticking close to the sites of their untimely demises; they don’t travel well.
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  16. dominionism
    • 2008 January 27, Elsa Dixler, “Paperback Row”, New York Times:
      Hedges, a former foreign correspondent for The Times, describes a Christian movement known as dominionism, which “calls on the radical church to take political power” and “shares many prominent features with classical fascist movements.”
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  17. downgradings
    • 2008 January 27, Robert J. Shiller, “To Build Confidence, Try Better Bricks”, New York Times:
      Problems in the bond market are likely to multiply if there are further downgradings of Ambac, or downgradings of other insurers like MBIA .
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  18. dybbuks
    • 2008 January 27, Jerome Groopman, “Faith and Healing”, New York Times:
      While Jewish mystics offered incantations and other rituals to expel dybbuks, the Gospels associate the powers of exorcism with belief in Jesus.
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  19. ensorcelling
    • 2008 January 27, William Safire, “Change Machine”, New York Times:
      Not merely the desire to be less judgmental; rather, I think, due to worldwide ensorcelling by the noun change.
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  20. flushings
    • 2008 January 27, Benjamin Black, “The Lemur”, New York Times:
      But of course the filter tip was too buoyant to go down — even some of the ash stayed on the surface of the water — and in the end, after repeated, vain flushings, he had to fish the soggy thing out and wrap it in a wad of toilet tissue and carry it back to the office and throw it in the waste bin, where, he gloomily supposed, some cleaner or busybody janitor would nose it out and denounce him.
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  21. highish
    • 2008 January 27, Terrence Rafferty, “Doesn’t Scare Easily”, New York Times:
      Reading Barron, though, I realized that part of the reason his stories leave me cold is that they assume, as too much genre fiction does, a highish level of reader credulity, and I resent it.
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  22. hyperactivism
  23. hyperdeclarative
    • 2008 January 27, Susan Morgan; Photographs By Dwight Eschliman, “Sex in the City”, New York Times:
      Sherman’s poignant black-and-white photographs, “Untitled Film Stills” (1977-1980), featured the artist as an isolated character in some anonymous melodrama; Holzer’s “Truisms,” aggressively hyperdeclarative phrases gleaned from everyday life, surfaced on posters, stickers and patches; Kruger’s signature collages displayed a bold graphic style — red, white and Futura Bold Italic — and an unabashedly confrontational tone; and Lawler transfigured existing images to subvert conventional meanings.
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  24. laserdisc
    • 2008 January 27, Dennis Lim, “Instant Nostalgia? Let’s Go to the Videotape”, New York Times:
      Its dominance was tested in the ’80s by the laserdisc, the first consumer medium to use optical recording technology and not magnetic tape.
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  25. liftgate
    • 2008 January 27, Phil Patton, “So Efficient, L.E.D.’s Are Now Fashion Plates, Too”, New York Times:
      Now L.E.D.’s are found in the taillights of most luxury cars: in the circular constellations of red stars in Infinitis, in bold horizontal bands on the liftgate of the Lincoln MKX crossover wagon, in a quartet of brand-signaling bands on BMWs and as hints of tailfins on the Cadillac DTS .
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  26. lutzes
    • 2008 January 27, Pat Borzi, “In a Youth Movement, Nagasu Wins the Title”, New York Times:
      Meissner fell three times, on two triple lutzes and a triple flip, to drop from fourth, the worst performance by a defending champion in at least 50 years.
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  27. medievality
    • 2008 January 27, Ken Kalfus, “Middle-Age Man”, New York Times:
      His late wife ran a Victorian inn in upstate New York; his son grew up mimicking his father’s medievality and, shunning his contemporaries, devoted himself to early music; his mother-in-law is an ethnic Lemko from the Carpathians, intent on recreating the way of life her people lived before their slaughter and forced deportations in the 1940s.
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  28. megavitamins
    • 2008 January 27, Jerome Groopman, “Faith and Healing”, New York Times:
      In my work as a specialist in cancer, blood diseases and AIDS , hardly a week goes by when patients do not bring up the above interventions, as well as Buddhist meditation, qigong, acupuncture , megavitamins and macrobiotic diets.
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  29. memorialization
    • 2008 January 27, Geoffrey C. Ward, “Death’s Army”, New York Times:
      In the end most Americans of my great-great-grandfather’s generation — and their successors — allowed their shared memories of suffering to “establish sacrifice and its memorialization as the ground on which North and South would ultimately reunite.”
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  30. midmeal
    • 2008 January 27, ZoWolff, “Know-It-Alls on a Riff”, New York Times:
      Chris Baio, the bassist, bought a book on sale for $5 about Arthur Lee, of the ’60s psychedelic band Love. Mr. Baio whipped out the book midmeal for show and tell.
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  31. multicivilizational
    • 2008 January 27, Parag Khanna, “Waving Goodbye to Hegemony”, New York Times:
      What we have today, for the first time in history, is a global, multicivilizational, multipolar battle.
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  32. multifamilies
    • 2008 January 27, C. J. Hughes, “Beaten Down, and Not Only by Nature”, New York Times:
      Gipson Street has multifamilies that have risen over the last few years from the sites of teardowns; Beach Ninth Street’s condos, with narrow stoops and Juliet balconies, are also examples of “infill” housing.
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  33. noninterventionist
    • 2008 January 27, Chris Suellentrop, “The Isolationist”, New York Times:
      Online, in what is sometimes called the “money primary,” a foreign policy noninterventionist is breaking fund-raising records.
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  34. nonsuperstars
    • 2008 January 27, Jenny Lyn Bader, “When Icons Die Young”, New York Times:
      In a way it is comforting, perhaps even life affirming, for the majority of human beings, nonsuperstars, to think they have chosen the other course.
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  35. overregulated
    • 2008 January 27, Christopher Caldwell, “Old-School Economics”, New York Times:
      To have overregulated or overtaxed Bill Gates 20 years ago might have killed a goose that still had many golden eggs to lay.
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  36. overskirt
    • 2008 January 27, Cathy Horyn, “A Final Curtain Call for Valentino”, New York Times:
      There were flower embroideries, but the exemplary looks were cooler — like a long slim dress in pistachio duchess satin with a low back and swags of sky blue satin starting at the bust and spreading around the green into an overskirt.
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  37. postretirement
    • 2008 January 27, Matt Higgins, “For Rahlves, No Longer Man Against Mountain”, New York Times:
      It was not a situation that Rahlves, 34, one of the most accomplished World Cup downhill racers in American skiing history, would have imagined for his postretirement career.
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  38. preinsulated
    • 2008 January 27, Valerie Cotsalas, “Solar and Relatively Affordable?”, New York Times:
      The foundation was delivered separately in preinsulated concrete slabs, and builders are finishing the interior and exterior details on site.
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  39. ranchlands
    • 2008 January 27, Andrew Rice, “A Dying Breed”, New York Times:
      Mugira was just about to tell me what made the Holsteins so valuable when suddenly, Dr. Grace Asiimwe, a veterinarian and my guide through western Uganda’s ranchlands, shouted, “The Ankoles are coming!”
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  40. relitigating
    • 2008 January 27, Jim Schachter, “Returned to Sender”, New York Times:
      There’s no point relitigating that now, despite my fitful daydreams of smashing each of the china cup-and-saucer sets I’d purchased as Mother’s Day gifts into chalky shards of memory.
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  41. repackager
    • 2008 January 27, Norm Alster, “Outsmarting the Pack During Earnings Season”, New York Times:
      ALSO in the cross-hairs at StarMine is First Marblehead , a repackager of student loans . Mr. Gaumer cites the forecast of Matthew Snowling, the Friedman, Billings, Ramsay analyst, who expects First Marblehead to report a loss of $1.42 a share, worse than the consensus forecast of a loss of $1.12.
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  42. repackagers
    • 2008 January 27, Terrence Rafferty, “Screams in Asia Echo in Hollywood”, New York Times:
      In the ’50s, the Stone Age of exploitation-movie history, shrewd Hollywood producers would simply have done what they did with the Japanese monster movies of that era: chop them up, hastily dub them into English and — if the repackagers were feeling particularly frisky — shoot a few minutes of new footage with a minor, familiar and presumably desperate American actor.
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  43. rescreened
    • 2008 January 27, “Letters: Bad (and Good) Airports”, New York Times:
      The insufferable lines and the need to be rescreened at security even though you have never left a secured area is unexplained.
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  44. schlag
    • 2008 January 27, Guy Trebay, “Dr. Dippy, Meet Dr. Evil”, New York Times:
      Think of Dr. Von Hallor, the Viennese psychiatrist in “Mr. Deeds Goes to Town,” his accent and diagnostic skills as thick as schlag.
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  45. serrano *
    • 2008 January 27, Daniel Patterson, “Stock Options”, New York Times:
      2 teaspoons minced serrano chili
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  46. superhealthy
  47. supermommies
    • 2008 January 27, Guy Trebay, “Dr. Dippy, Meet Dr. Evil”, New York Times:
      Television and movies have presented shrinks as villains, as shamans, as pert, efficient problem solvers like Dr. Joyce Brothers and as supermommies in the mold of the late Penelope Russianoff, a therapist who played a therapist in Paul Mazursky ’s 1978 “An Unmarried Woman.”
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  48. superthin
  49. surprisers
    • 2008 January 27, Norm Alster, “Outsmarting the Pack During Earnings Season”, New York Times:
      Ideally, investors would make their move to buy or short a potential surprise two weeks ahead of the announcement, said Mr. Miller, who has compared the performance of positive and negative surprisers from two weeks before to four weeks after they reported results.
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  50. underarticulated
    • 2008 January 27, Ken Kalfus, “Middle-Age Man”, New York Times:
      Although Wodicka turns up a provocative thought here and there, this musing, typical of Burt’s grief-laden vaporousness, serves also to illustrate the artless, wordy and underarticulated writing that makes “All Shall Be Well” such a Black Death of a chore to read.
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  51. unfakable
    • 2008 January 27, Terrence Rafferty, “Doesn’t Scare Easily”, New York Times:
      Lacking that authentic, unfakable, belief-compelling insanity, stories like those in “The Imago Sequence” can’t achieve anything much better than nuttiness.
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  52. unquenchably
    • 2008 January 27, Brian Morton, “In the American Grain”, New York Times:
      Kazin, by contrast, was God-haunted (“I want my God back” is the next-to-last sentence of his 1978 memoir, “New York Jew”); unquenchably fascinated by American literature and American history; and politically radical, but in a fashion that owed less to Marx than to Whitman — Kazin’s radicalism was democratic, generous, angry and thoroughly in the American grain.
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  53. vaporousness
    • 2008 January 27, Ken Kalfus, “Middle-Age Man”, New York Times:
      Although Wodicka turns up a provocative thought here and there, this musing, typical of Burt’s grief-laden vaporousness, serves also to illustrate the artless, wordy and underarticulated writing that makes “All Shall Be Well” such a Black Death of a chore to read.
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  54. wahyu
    • 2008 January 27, Seth Mydans, “As Suharto Clings to Life, Mystics See Spirits’ Power”, New York Times:
      In Javanese tradition, power has an essence of its own, known as wahyu, and is conferred like a mantle on certain chosen people in a way similar to the “mandate of heaven” that empowered Chinese emperors.
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  55. waysiders
    • 2008 January 27, J. R. Moehringer, “King of the Road”, New York Times:
      Vollmann is an avid student of squalor, a Rhodes scholar of squalor, and thus this book also features an ensemble of demented waysiders, ceaseless transcriptions of loathsome graffiti — and the requisite references to prostitution.
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Sequestered[edit]

  1. rickey
    • 2008 January 27, Zo㋠Wolff, “Know-It-Alls on a Riff”, New York Times:
      “I think they invented the lime rickey here,” said the band’s keyboardist, Rostam Batmanglij, who interned for the Oxford English Dictionary during college.
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