User:Visviva/NYT 20080201

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This is a list of lowercase non-hyphenated single words found in the 2008-02-01 issue of the New York Times which did not have English entries in the English Wiktionary when this list was created (2009-03-03).

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108294 tokens ‧ 77497 valid lowercase tokens ‧ 9326 types ‧ 32 (~ 0.343%) words before cleaning ‧ 

2008-02-01[edit]

  1. bansari
    • 2008 February 1, The New York Times, “Jazz Listings”, New York Times:
      In this group he enlists George Brooks on reeds, Ronu Majumdar on bansari flute and Vijay Ghate on tabla.
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  2. cerebrally
  3. cinquecento *
  4. depthless
    • 2008 February 1, Holland Cotter, “Artistic Muscle, Flexed for Medicis”, New York Times:
      A Rosso drawing of the Virgin and Child surrounded by saints is a brittle, twisting affair of posturing figures in a depthless space.
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  5. froggish
    • 2008 February 1, The New York Times, “Pop and Rock Listings”, New York Times:
      ★ JOANNA NEWSOM (Friday) The fairy queen of the freak-folk movement, Ms. Newsom uses a harp and her froggish little voice to spin elaborate, beguiling fantasies.
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  6. linenlike
    • 2008 February 1, Eric Wilson, “Doing Their Part to Help Save the Planet, in High Style”, New York Times:
      There was Donna Karan’s submission, a knotted dress made of Sasawashi, a linenlike Japanese fabric woven from bits of paper and herbs, which Ms. Karan had soaked in tea to give it a delicate amber hue.
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  7. lusterware
    • 2008 February 1, Wendy Moonan, “Plenty of Porcelain in West Palm Beach”, New York Times:
      It has a Hispano-Moresque lusterware dish made before 1623 that depicts a soldier in hues of bright blue and orange.
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  8. microcosmos
    • 2008 February 1, The New York Times, “Pop and Rock Listings”, New York Times:
      LUPE FIASCO (Saturday) A talented and proudly goofy rapper from Chicago, Lupe Fiasco occupies an unusual middle ground between the microcosmos of alternative hip-hop and the glittery mainstream of Kanye West and Jay-Z. His newest, “The Cool” (Atlantic), is a concept album that drips with allegory, about a ghetto player with dice for eyes and a temptress with tattoos of past boyfriends like Al Capone and Alexander the Great.
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  9. mosslike
    • 2008 February 1, Karen Crouse, “Petty Already Rocking Long Before Halftime”, New York Times:
      With his shoulder-length sandy blond hair and mosslike beard, the drumstick-thin Petty looked like a twig from Patriots left tackle Matt Light’s family tree.
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  10. nonbroadcast
    • 2008 February 1, Brian Stelter, “TV Stations Seek Shows to Put Online”, New York Times:
      Or “are they just using the Internet to raise the price for their existing advertisers, or are they using it to go after nonbroadcast advertisers?”
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  11. noninevitability
    • 2008 February 1, The New York Times, “Dance Listings”, New York Times:
      CHARLOTTE GIBBONS AND CLARINDA MAC LOW (Friday and Saturday) Ms. Gibbons will present “disappearing never-ending return,” which she describes as a dance of lightness, possibilities and noninevitability. Ms. MacLow will present “Rui(nation),” an exploration of the seductive nature of power and authority that is loosely based on Shakespeare ’s “Macbeth.”
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  12. nonobject
    • 2008 February 1, Roberta Smith, “When the Conceptual Was Political”, New York Times:
      Its main message is that while Latin American Conceptual or nonobject artists were heterogeneous, they tended to differ from those in Europe and North America by emphasizing accessibility, audience participation and sociopolitical relevance.
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  13. outnice
  14. ponderosa
    • 2008 February 1, Bethany Lyttle, “Canada, but Think of Warmth and Wine”, New York Times:
      Throughout the region’s rolling landscape of sagebrush, vineyards and ponderosa pines, there are dozens of wineries , most with boutique hotels and restaurants.
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  15. poplike
    • 2008 February 1, The New York Times, “Jazz Listings”, New York Times:
      EIVIND OPSVIK’S OVERSEAS (Sunday) Eivind Opsvik is a Norwegian bassist-composer who carefully balances avant-gardism against poplike lyricism in this working band with Tony Malaby on tenor saxophone, Jacob Sacks on piano and Kenny Wollesen on drums.
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  16. postplaying
  17. sereno *
  18. snapback
    • 2008 February 1, Michael M. Grynbaum, “Stocks Rally in Defiance of Bad News”, New York Times:
      “There is so much bad news priced in that eventually you’re going to have a snapback rally in those bond insurers,” said Ryan Detrick, a stock market strategist at Schaeffer’s Investment Research.
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  19. snowcats
    • 2008 February 1, David Page, “Bond of Brothers in a California Wilderness”, New York Times:
      Beyond Watterson Divide, still less than halfway there, the distant twinkling of snowcats on Mammoth Mountain disappeared in the west.
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  20. snowdrifted
    • 2008 February 1, David Page, “Bond of Brothers in a California Wilderness”, New York Times:
      The last 12 miles across snowdrifted sagebrush flats, up into Jeffrey pines and curl-leaf mountain mahogany, to the warmth of the well-appointed hut would have to be covered by snowmobile, with gear, food and a guest dragged in on a sled with steel runners.
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  21. snowshoers
  22. undanceable
    • 2008 February 1, The New York Times, “Pop and Rock Listings”, New York Times:
      PLAID (Friday) This British electronic duo has been making opaque, undanceable electronic music for 17 years now; its latest was the soundtrack to a Japanese animated film, “Tekkon Kinkreet.”
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Sequestered[edit]

  1. whitebark
    • 2008 February 1, David Page, “Bond of Brothers in a California Wilderness”, New York Times:
      They skied down through open glades of whitebark pine and lodgepole, dropping more than 2,000 vertical feet — all the way back to the property.
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