User:Visviva/NYT 20080203

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This is a list of lowercase non-hyphenated single words found in the 2008-02-03 issue of the New York Times which did not have English entries in the English Wiktionary when this list was created (2009-03-03).

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170389 tokens ‧ 124919 valid lowercase tokens ‧ 12897 types ‧ 70 (~ 0.543%) words before cleaning ‧ 

2008-02-03[edit]

  1. ahas
    • 2008 February 3, Janet Rae-Dupree, “Eureka! It Really Takes Years of Hard Work”, New York Times:
      As humans, we want to believe that creativity and innovation come in flashes of pure brilliance, with great thunderclaps and echoing ahas.
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  2. antialarmist
    • 2008 February 3, Virginia Heffernan, “My Wired Youth”, New York Times:
      : “ Growing Up Online ” — the evenhanded, ultimately antialarmist account of Internet kids — can be seen entirely online at PBS.org . It’s a public-TV courtesy: you don’t have to break your Internet habit to learn about it.
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  3. antidiabetic
  4. antigenocide
  5. antitotalitarian
    • 2008 February 3, James Traub, “A Statesman Without Borders”, New York Times:
      Over time, like a number of European intellectuals, Kouchner migrated from the radical left to the antitotalitarian center.
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  6. blocos
    • 2008 February 3, Alexei Barrionuevo, “No Body Left Untoned Preparing for Carnival”, New York Times:
      Just as physically demanding — especially for die-hard samba dancers — are the less formal, and often more brazen, Carnival parties and parades known as blocos.
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  7. brut *
    • 2008 February 3, Hilary Howard, “Delta Gets Help in Bolstering Its Wine List”, New York Times:
      Selections for February and March include the 2006 A to Z Pinot Noir; a Mionetto prosecco brut; and the 2006 Wente Riva Ranch Reserve Chardonnay.
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  8. cervelas
  9. cobblestoned
    • 2008 February 3, Amy Finnerty, “Last Exit”, New York Times:
      With Manhattan financially out of reach, the literary caste has moved to Brooklyn in search of extra bedrooms, parks and cobblestoned charm.
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  10. componente *
  11. contredanses
    • 2008 February 3, N. R. Kleinfield, “From Irrelevance to Influence”, New York Times:
      On Tuesday, local Democrats will assemble at the Tioga Trails Cafe to study the election returns on a 15-foot screen adjacent to the area where contredanses are held.
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  12. coothood
    • 2008 February 3, Dave Kehr, “Forever Hunky: Ageless Action Figures”, New York Times:
      The stars who emerged in the 1960s and early ’70s — before cable television, home video and the Internet began to divide the audience into discrete demographic groups — will likely be the last generation to make it into coothood with their popularity more or less intact: Clint Eastwood (now 77), Jack Nicholson (70), Al Pacino (67).
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  13. cootness
    • 2008 February 3, Dave Kehr, “Forever Hunky: Ageless Action Figures”, New York Times:
      Wayne would go on to achieve cootness, and his long-deserved Oscar, as the broken-down Rooster Cogburn of “True Grit” (1969).
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  14. cornhusk
    • 2008 February 3, “Where the Twain Meet”, New York Times:
      The Ecuadorean offerings are the best, particularly the humitas, steamed cornhusk tamales stuffed with a moist and fresh filling of sweet corn.
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  15. countermeetings
    • 2008 February 3, David W. Chen, “As Corzine Lines Up Allies for Toll Plan, Republicans Push Back”, New York Times:
      Steven M. Lonegan, from the conservative wing of the Republican Party and a former candidate for governor, has started to organize countermeetings, and last week he convened a teleconference with Senate Minority Leader Thomas H. Kean Jr. and Assemblyman Michael J. Doherty to further his cause.
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  16. cucarachas
    • 2008 February 3, Tatiana Boncompagni, “Tostadas to a Salsa Beat”, New York Times:
      “I always say, sweat the cucarachas out,” she said.
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  17. designerati
    • 2008 February 3, Richard S. Chang, “A Foundation in the Classics”, New York Times:
      IN the contemporary landscape of architecture, someone like Richard Sammons doesn’t get lionized by the fledgling and impressionable (and constantly blogging) designerati.
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  18. dodgeballs
    • 2008 February 3, Dave Itzkoff, “On the Road With Vince Vaughn, Not Just for Laughs”, New York Times:
      The story of a sarcastic if affable guy, with a self-satisfied grin and immaculate sideburns, who wins over the guys and gals with his smart-aleck comebacks and learns a few life lessons along the way, possibly after finding true love or being barraged with dodgeballs.
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  19. elsewheres
    • 2008 February 3, Dave Itzkoff, “Elsewhere’s Children”, New York Times:
      His “UnLondon,” discovered in the book by two schoolgirl heroines named Zanna and Deeba, is a tempting, carefully plotted rebellion against the cotton-candy elsewheres offered up by most children’s novels.
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  20. fistfighter
  21. halfbreed
    • 2008 February 3, Ligaya Mishan, “The Bishop’s Report”, New York Times:
      Inevitably, the bishop himself strays from righteousness, and his oblique account of his downfall — a halfbreed girl accuses him of fathering her child — maintains a perfect pitch of cruelty and farce.
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  22. humitas
    • 2008 February 3, “Where the Twain Meet”, New York Times:
      The Ecuadorean offerings are the best, particularly the humitas, steamed cornhusk tamales stuffed with a moist and fresh filling of sweet corn.
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  23. intoxicatingly
    • 2008 February 3, Alan Riding, “Soap Opera”, New York Times:
      Carr has not tackled just what makes Wagner’s music so intoxicatingly dangerous.
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  24. ladleful
    • 2008 February 3, Sara Dickerman, “Lovin’ Spoonfuls”, New York Times:
      Continue adding milk by the ladleful and stirring, until the rice is tender to the bite, 15 to 20 minutes.
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  25. largo *
    • 2008 February 3, James Angelos, “Radio Days”, New York Times:
      “I want you to hear that largo.
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  26. loupan
    • 2008 February 3, Joyce Cohen, “Home Is Where Harmony Is”, New York Times:
      The loupan, or compass, is used by practitioners of feng shui.
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  27. measuringly
    • 2008 February 3, Benjamin Black, “The Lemur”, New York Times:
      She was still watching him measuringly.
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  28. mermaidlike
    • 2008 February 3, Alison Stateman, “The House That Whimsy Built”, New York Times:
      The peeling paint decorating the first story, on which mermaidlike women in rainbow-bright colors emerge from a yellow background, hints at the neighborhood’s vanishing bohemian past.
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  29. miasmic
    • 2008 February 3, “Letters to the Editor”, New York Times:
      Re “Olympic Teams Vying to Defeat Beijing’s Smog,” Jan. 24: Regarding the possibility that United States athletes will wear masks to protect their lungs from the miasmic Chinese air, Randy Wilber, an exercise physiologist based at the Olympic Training Center in Colorado Springs, said it would be a “huge political issue and an embarrassment to the Chinese people and the I.O.C. ”
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  30. microinitiatives
    • 2008 February 3, Frank Rich, “Ask Not What J.F.K. Can Do for Obama”, New York Times:
      There’s a third possibility, of course: A poetically gifted president might be able to bring about change without relying on fistfighting as his primary modus operandi. Mr. Obama argues that if he can bring some Republicans along, he can achieve changes larger than the microinitiatives that have been a hallmark of Clintonism.
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  31. midlist
    • 2008 February 3, Rachel Donadio, “Waiting for It”, New York Times:
      Much to the anxiety of midlist writers clamoring for attention, chain stores determine how many copies of a title to buy based on the expected media attention and the author’s previous sales record.
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  32. multibranding
    • 2008 February 3, Stephen Kotkin, “In Praise of the Decisive C.E.O.”, New York Times:
      David C. Novak, the chief executive of Yum Brands, explains to them why McDonald’s can succeed by offering seven types of food under one roof, and yet Yum customers would not go to Yum’s KFC for a pizza or to Yum’s Pizza Hut for fried chicken. Mr. Tichy and Mr. Bennis expect Mr. Novak, as the leader, somehow to hurdle this multibranding barrier to higher growth.
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  33. overpsychologizing
    • 2008 February 3, Ligaya Mishan, “The Bishop’s Report”, New York Times:
      Throughout, du Boucheron steers clear of overpsychologizing, staying true to the medieval worldview even as he slyly creates a modern morality tale.
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  34. peoplists
    • 2008 February 3, Jonathan Chait, “Other People’s Money”, New York Times:
      His two examples of peoplists are the socialist Bernie Sanders and the libertarian Ron Paul — and if you’re surprised that the author would find common ground with a libertarian like Paul, keep in mind Johnston’s view of government as a tool of the rich.
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  35. phrasedickery
    • 2008 February 3, William Safire, “Dirty Tricks”, New York Times:
      (Cummins credits Ben Zimmer, an editor at the Oxford University Press, for this research; Zimmer is a source of mine on phrasedickery too.)
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  36. predictableness
    • 2008 February 3, Charles Mcgrath, “Great Literature? Depends Whodunit”, New York Times:
      What we look for in genre writing, Mr. Updike suggested, is exactly what the critics sometimes complain about; the predictableness of a formula successfully executed.
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  37. semimod
    • 2008 February 3, David Browne, “Mellow and Groovy and Fighting Crime”, New York Times:
      The trio’s gruff but compassionate boss (Tige Andrews) sported a semimod Caesar haircut and chewed over lines like “If only kids would learn to run to a cop instead of running from one.”
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  38. servelat
    • 2008 February 3, John Tagliabue, “Swiss Sausage Fans Fret Over How to Save Their Skin”, New York Times:
      The name cervelas — Switzerland’s jumble of languages yields other spellings, including cervelat, zervelat and servelat — is derived from cerebellum, Latin for brain, since the sausage originally consisted of pork and pigs’ brain.
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  39. sluglike
    • 2008 February 3, Dave Itzkoff, “Elsewhere’s Children”, New York Times:
      If you already know this 35-year-old Londoner for Gothic novels like “King Rat” or short stories like “Familiar” (in which a spell-caster conjures a protean, sluglike companion from his own body tissues and fluids), then you understand he’s not the most logical candidate to be given unfettered access to the impressionable minds of children.
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  40. soundboard
    • 2008 February 3, Molly Reid, “Sean Yseult and Chris Lee”, New York Times:
      Then, as now, they spent their days walking around the city they love, frequenting favorite restaurants or cooking meals at home, and serving as each other’s creative soundboard.
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  41. speedskater
    • 2008 February 3, Bill Pennington, “Perfection Is Afterthought, Perfect Examples Say”, New York Times:
      Like Brady, the speedskater Eric Heiden, who won five gold medals in a sweep of the individual events during the 1980 Olympics, said his approach was not reflective at all.
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  42. spookdom
    • 2008 February 3, William Safire, “Dirty Tricks”, New York Times:
      In a 1967 article about Richard Helms, then the new director of Central Intelligence, Time made the linguistic jump to spookdom: “When he surfaced in 1952, it was as deputy to the chief of the plans division, the so-called ‘dirty tricks’ department, which handles espionage and other undercover operations.”
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  43. stoveside
    • 2008 February 3, Sara Dickerman, “Lovin’ Spoonfuls”, New York Times:
      The noise of the whizzing machine might disturb the calm of my stoveside reverie, but the satin texture makes the disruption worthwhile.
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  44. supermannequin
    • 2008 February 3, David Colman, “Bang the Drums Softly”, New York Times:
      The supermannequin Shalom Harlow got into the noiseless-poise racket early — via ballet lessons.
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  45. superspook
    • 2008 February 3, William Safire, “Dirty Tricks”, New York Times:
      The former superspook confided to me that he planned to challenge Baker to a lie-detector test on what was labeled “Debategate.”
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  46. sysprog
    • 2008 February 3, Virginia Heffernan, “My Wired Youth”, New York Times:
      I assumed the ludicrous screen name Athena (my favorite sysprog called himself Apollo), while Megan’s handle was cooler: the doors.
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  47. sysprogs
    • 2008 February 3, Virginia Heffernan, “My Wired Youth”, New York Times:
      We then consorted — first with the sysprogs and each other, then with Dartmouth students, then with twisted weirdos, merchant marines and college students up and down the East Coast.
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  48. thrillerdom
    • 2008 February 3, Charles Mcgrath, “Great Literature? Depends Whodunit”, New York Times:
      You also have to conclude that Conker or its lawyers don’t know much about the publishing business — that is, if they really believed that Ms. Brady had suffered from turning to thrillerdom.
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  49. tostadas
    • 2008 February 3, Tatiana Boncompagni, “Tostadas to a Salsa Beat”, New York Times:
      A platter of chicken and octopus tostadas and two ceviches arrived at the table, and the women reminisced about homemade potato chips and arepas from Colombia and Curaçao, the Caribbean island Ms. Hoffmann’s parents moved to when she was 2 years old.
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  50. triplexes
    • 2008 February 3, Josh Barbanel, “Who Pays the Most Taxes?”, New York Times:
      A CRAZY QUILT OF TAX LAWS The same provisions created to shield middle-class homeowners in the Bronx or co-op residents on Queens Boulevard from onerous tax increases also protect the billionaire owners of opulent town houses and sprawling triplexes.
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  51. trolleyology
    • 2008 February 3, Paul Bloom, “Morality Studies”, New York Times:
      It used to be that the only people who had even heard of such dilemmas were professional philosophers, but now it seems as if everyone is doing trolleyology.
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  52. unabsorbed
    • 2008 February 3, Sara Dickerman, “Lovin’ Spoonfuls”, New York Times:
      On the last addition of milk, leave most of the milk unabsorbed.
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  53. ungeeky
    • 2008 February 3, Virginia Heffernan, “My Wired Youth”, New York Times:
      At 13, Megan and I introduced our friends to the conference, and as early adapters she and I felt obliged to play the pros and make the whole thing look ungeeky.
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  54. yakfest
  55. zervelat
    • 2008 February 3, John Tagliabue, “Swiss Sausage Fans Fret Over How to Save Their Skin”, New York Times:
      The name cervelas — Switzerland’s jumble of languages yields other spellings, including cervelat, zervelat and servelat — is derived from cerebellum, Latin for brain, since the sausage originally consisted of pork and pigs’ brain.
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Sequestered[edit]

  1. chica *
  2. naturedly
    • 2008 February 3, Katie Thomas, “Big Game Is No Place for the Average Fan”, New York Times:
      Seacrest, the host of the Fox television show “American Idol,” will probably banter good naturedly with the usual array of movie stars, reality-show regulars and socialites.
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  3. extravangza = extravaganza
    • 2008 February 3, Liesl Schillinger, “Leaving Las Vegas”, New York Times:
      He revels in the whine of the tattooer’s drill each time he gets new ink: “Electricity lit up Ponyboy’s skeletal structure as if it were a pinball machine on a multi-ball extravangza, and the mingling odors of brimstone and sulfur and sweat and burning skin filled Ponyboy’s nostrils.”
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