User:Visviva/NYT 20080217

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This is a list of lowercase non-hyphenated single words found in the 2008-02-17 issue of the New York Times which did not have English entries in the English Wiktionary when this list was created (2009-03-03).

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171919 tokens ‧ 125291 valid lowercase tokens ‧ 12777 types ‧ 65 (~ 0.509%) words before cleaning ‧ 

2008-02-17[edit]

  1. acroteria
    • 2008 February 17, Christopher Gray, “A Greek Temple Dedicated to Art and Learning”, New York Times:
      According to contemporary accounts, there were also to have been bronze acroteria — small ornamental decorations — in the form of sphinxes at the gable ends of the sloped roof, but these were not carried out.
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  2. amoebashaped
    • 2008 February 17, Anita Gates, “There Will Be Memories”, New York Times:
      1998: Cher’s champagnebeaded Bob Mackie gown with see-through skirt and frightening amoebashaped hat.
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  3. anytown
    • 2008 February 17, Harvey Araton, “Players on a Bus Ride to Sad Reality”, New York Times:
      The bus rolled away from a well-fortified hotel amid anytown sights, filled with everyday N.B.A. sounds.
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  4. bellsleeve
    • 2008 February 17, Anita Gates, “There Will Be Memories”, New York Times:
      1978: Vanessa Redgrave’s bellsleeve monastery gown (the night of her “Zionist hoodlums” bit), topping Diane Keaton’s “Annie Hall” look.
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  5. bloodspot
    • 2008 February 17, Donald Ray Pollock, “Ink Before You Vote”, New York Times:
      “Racism is still an ugly thing in this country,” he says, dabbing at a tiny bloodspot.
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  6. champagnebeaded
    • 2008 February 17, Anita Gates, “There Will Be Memories”, New York Times:
      1998: Cher’s champagnebeaded Bob Mackie gown with see-through skirt and frightening amoebashaped hat.
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  7. coronas *
    • 2008 February 17, Jessica Bruder, “Up All Night”, New York Times:
      It’s easy to see why Fiona loves this landscape: moonflowers bloom with a spectral glow, and fireflies shine brightly, with coronas like tiny Japanese lanterns.
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  8. counteraccusation
    • 2008 February 17, Robert F. Worth, “Decoding Lebanese Paranoia”, New York Times:
      AFTER the notorious Hezbollah commander Imad Mugniyah was killed in a mysterious car bombing in the Syrian capital, Damascus, on Tuesday, a storm of accusation and counteraccusation quickly arose back here in Lebanon.
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  9. counterreform
  10. crudo *
    • 2008 February 17, “Honey-Lacquered”, New York Times:
      The restaurant appears determined to capture all current and past trends in Italian menus: food served raw, barely cooked and fully cooked; carpaccio, tartare and crudo; salumi and cheese; panini and crustless tramezzini; and the traditional antipasti, primi and secondi.
      add
  11. crustless
    • 2008 February 17, “Honey-Lacquered”, New York Times:
      The restaurant appears determined to capture all current and past trends in Italian menus: food served raw, barely cooked and fully cooked; carpaccio, tartare and crudo; salumi and cheese; panini and crustless tramezzini; and the traditional antipasti, primi and secondi.
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  12. cusphood
  13. dominionist
  14. fluty
    • 2008 February 17, Charles Mcgrath, “Is PBS Still Necessary?”, New York Times:
      With her permed hair, dowdy clothes and fluty accent, the main character, Hyacinth, is practically a parody of a certain strain in public broadcasting: the one that puts on airs and wants to pretend to singularity.
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  15. froggish
    • 2008 February 17, Richard S. Chang, “Triumph Is Pick of Online Voters”, New York Times:
      At a time when American muscle cars have become treasured icons and Italian sports cars are, well, Italian sports cars, Mr. Rhodes, 33, didn’t think his froggish little roadster stood a chance.
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  16. geodome
    • 2008 February 17, David Colman, “Art and Life, Steeping in a Teapot”, New York Times:
      Today, even as Mr. Haeg is putting his beloved geodome on the market and deaccessioning unnecessary objects, there is one thing he is hanging onto.
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  17. kraton *
    • 2008 February 17, Seth Mydans, “In a Sultanate Known as Solo, One Too Many Kings”, New York Times:
      But the kraton here sees itself as a keeper of Javanese tradition — of purity, refinement and cosmic spirituality — and has continued to perform court rituals and to hold regal processions through the city.
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  18. kreyol
    • 2008 February 17, Rob Kenner, “From Dancehall Rapper to Nursery Rhymer”, New York Times:
      The disc offers infectiously fresh interpretations of traditional West Indian folk songs along with a few originals performed — in authentic patois and kreyol — by Father Goose and a galaxy of Caribbean stars who live in Brooklyn, including Sister Carol, Screechy Dan and Ansel Meditation of the harmony trio the Meditations.
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  19. lionheart
    • 2008 February 17, Nicholas D. Kristof, “The World’s Worst Panderer”, New York Times:
      But the United States Congress tends to be a courage-free zone, so Mr. McCain’s orneriness toward Republican primary voters makes him a lionheart in the political world.
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  20. marathonlike
    • 2008 February 17, Nick Kaye And Hilary Howard, “Long Cruises: Too Much of a Good Thing?”, New York Times:
      Some are short and to the point, like 10Ks, and some are mileage-heavy, requiring a marathonlike time commitment.
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  21. megalodon
    • 2008 February 17, “Bookshelf”, New York Times:
      Imagine a Cenozoic shark, Carcharodon megalodon: the “swimming nightmare.”
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  22. megawealthy
  23. midcalf
    • 2008 February 17, “Midwest Mex”, New York Times:
      I wear what is called a waiter apron; it’s white and comes midcalf.
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  24. minicity
    • 2008 February 17, Sue A. Brush; As Told To Louise Kramer, “The Contented Traveler”, New York Times:
      It was a minicity.
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  25. molcajetes
    • 2008 February 17, “Midwest Mex”, New York Times:
      Favorite ancient cooking implement: They are these Mexican mortar-and-pestle-type tools called molcajetes.
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  26. nonsovereign
    • 2008 February 17, Steven Erlanger, “For Israel, Gaza Offers a Range of Risky Choices”, New York Times:
      Israel is trying to contain a new form of polity: a nonsovereign, semioccupied semistate controlled by Hamas , which is considered a terrorist group by the United States and the European Union and is officially committed to the destruction of the country obligated to provide it with fuel, electricity, water and food.
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  27. oilwells
    • 2008 February 17, David Orr, “Dream Logic”, New York Times:
      The navigator’s needle swung strangely, oscillating between the oilwells and ask again later.
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  28. panderings
    • 2008 February 17, Elinor Lipman, “An Imaginary Friend”, New York Times:
      Witchel is especially good at rendering the hierarchy at Boothby’s and its panderings to popular culture.
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  29. parentlike
    • 2008 February 17, Jessica Bruder, “Up All Night”, New York Times:
      With relief, she recognizes her dog, Max, who in a parentlike role has come to guide her home.
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  30. partygoing
  31. peaberry
    • 2008 February 17, “Hawaii Budget Choices”, New York Times:
      They have a great facility that includes a tour and tastings of a wide variety of roasts, including the incredible peaberry.
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  32. pobiz
    • 2008 February 17, David Orr, “Dream Logic”, New York Times:
      She is in many ways a typical American poet in early career: She teaches workshops, helps edit a journal, keeps a busy reading schedule, pops up at artists’ colonies, publishes widely and has had to learn the basic steps of the pobiz hustle (her Web site is polished, her Wikipedia entry primed for expansion).
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  33. preplanning
    • 2008 February 17, Arthur Lubow, “The Pyrotechnic Imagination”, New York Times:
      “I spend so much time preplanning how to lay the fuses so as to have control and play against the power of the powder and the fuses.
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  34. primi *
    • 2008 February 17, “Honey-Lacquered”, New York Times:
      The restaurant appears determined to capture all current and past trends in Italian menus: food served raw, barely cooked and fully cooked; carpaccio, tartare and crudo; salumi and cheese; panini and crustless tramezzini; and the traditional antipasti, primi and secondi.
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  35. rackety
    • 2008 February 17, Benjamin Black, “The Lemur”, New York Times:
      It was a venerable and somewhat rackety contraption, and in the six months they had lived there, he’d never gotten comfortable in it, feeling constricted and vaguely at peril.
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  36. rhapsodically
    • 2008 February 17, Robin Marantz Henig, “Taking Play Seriously”, New York Times:
      On a drizzly Tuesday night in late January, 200 people came out to hear a psychiatrist talk rhapsodically about play — not just the intense, joyous play of children, but play for all people, at all ages, at all times.
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  37. scatalogical
    • 2008 February 17, Virginia Heffernan, “Cabinets of Wonder”, New York Times:
      Interest in certain anatomical and scatalogical images is considered simply prurient.
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  38. secondi *
    • 2008 February 17, “Honey-Lacquered”, New York Times:
      The restaurant appears determined to capture all current and past trends in Italian menus: food served raw, barely cooked and fully cooked; carpaccio, tartare and crudo; salumi and cheese; panini and crustless tramezzini; and the traditional antipasti, primi and secondi.
      add
  39. seethrough
    • 2008 February 17, Anita Gates, “There Will Be Memories”, New York Times:
      1969: Barbra Streisand’s seethrough, bell-bottom Scaasi pajamas.
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  40. semicomfortable
    • 2008 February 17, Benjamin Black, “The Lemur”, New York Times:
      Last week: John Glass had a semicomfortable conversation with Ambrose, teh police captain, about the murder of Dylan Riley.
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  41. semioccupied
    • 2008 February 17, Steven Erlanger, “For Israel, Gaza Offers a Range of Risky Choices”, New York Times:
      Israel is trying to contain a new form of polity: a nonsovereign, semioccupied semistate controlled by Hamas , which is considered a terrorist group by the United States and the European Union and is officially committed to the destruction of the country obligated to provide it with fuel, electricity, water and food.
      add
  42. semistate
    • 2008 February 17, Steven Erlanger, “For Israel, Gaza Offers a Range of Risky Choices”, New York Times:
      Israel is trying to contain a new form of polity: a nonsovereign, semioccupied semistate controlled by Hamas , which is considered a terrorist group by the United States and the European Union and is officially committed to the destruction of the country obligated to provide it with fuel, electricity, water and food.
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  43. shoreside
    • 2008 February 17, Michelle Higgins, “Seeing the Sights, Ditching the Shipmates”, New York Times:
      “All tour operators are researched extensively and tours are reviewed on an ongoing basis by both our shoreside and onboard staff,” Sarah Scoltock, a spokeswoman for Holland America, wrote in an e-mail message.
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  44. striplike
    • 2008 February 17, Harvey Araton, “Players on a Bus Ride to Sad Reality”, New York Times:
      Traffic on Canal Street had slowed to a Vegas striplike crawl, announcing the start of another All-Star Weekend.
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  45. subleased
    • 2008 February 17, Jay Romano, “No ‘D.I.Y.’ Rent Laws, Court of Appeals Rules”, New York Times:
      According to the Court of Appeals decision, Ms. Munroe and Mr. Saltzman combined two apartments and then in 1991 subleased the third with the landlord’s consent.
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  46. superinexpensive
    • 2008 February 17, “Midwest Mex”, New York Times:
      I have an étagère built onto the wall of my living room, which has cubicles that are lit and filled with superinexpensive pottery.
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  47. teamlike
    • 2008 February 17, Elinor Lipman, “An Imaginary Friend”, New York Times:
      Witchel’s crowd of stars and co-stars will have roles in an eventual social undoing in a nicely done “Murder on the Orient Express” teamlike way, not as partners in crime but as witnesses to, and exploiters of, an affair between two unlikely philanderers: Dr. Neil Grossman, the city’s most successful infertility doctor, and popular Ponce.
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  48. thalassotherapy
    • 2008 February 17, Nick Kaye And Hilary Howard, “Perks: Upping the Ante Onboard”, New York Times:
      Another spa-related Carnival first is a glass-domed thalassotherapy pool and thermal suite.
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  49. toolbag
    • 2008 February 17, Randy Kennedy, “Where You Going With That Monet?”, New York Times:
      The mundane reality is that many art thieves are simply not the sharpest grappling hooks in the toolbag; the smart ones choose to steal things that can be much more easily converted into money — or just money itself.
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  50. tramezzini *
    • 2008 February 17, “Honey-Lacquered”, New York Times:
      The restaurant appears determined to capture all current and past trends in Italian menus: food served raw, barely cooked and fully cooked; carpaccio, tartare and crudo; salumi and cheese; panini and crustless tramezzini; and the traditional antipasti, primi and secondi.
      add
  51. trdlo
    • 2008 February 17, “Prague in Winter”, New York Times:
      And when in Prague in the winter, make sure that you try a trdlo, dough rolled around a rolling pin, fried and covered with sugar and nuts.
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  52. turbos
    • 2008 February 17, Don Sherman, “More Power? Add Pressure”, New York Times:
      Superchargers are generally heavier and more expensive than turbos; turning the rotors also draws engine power, but the installation is simpler because they do not need an exhaust connection.
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  53. undecideds
  54. underhood
    • 2008 February 17, Don Sherman, “More Power? Add Pressure”, New York Times:
      Turbochargers make use of exhaust flow that would otherwise be wasted, but they can suffer poor response, and the underhood plumbing is complex.
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  55. underregulated
    • 2008 February 17, Gretchen Morgenson, “Arcane Market Is Next to Face Big Credit Test”, New York Times:
      “This is just a giant insurance industry that is underregulated and not very well reserved for and does not have very good standards as a result,” said Michael A. J. Farrell, chief executive of Annaly Capital Management in New York.
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  56. unneighborly
    • 2008 February 17, Josh Barbanel, “Neighbor vs. Neighbor”, New York Times:
      And if it is sometimes unwise and unneighborly, do co-op and condo boards worry about having too many litigators on the premises?
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  57. unpledged
    • 2008 February 17, John M. Broder, “Show Me the Delegate Rules and I’ll Show You the Party”, New York Times:
      Meanwhile, the Democrats are agonizing over the possibility that Mr. Obama and Mrs. Clinton will arrive at the Denver convention in August with the outcome dependent on the whims of unpledged superdelegates.
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  58. unrecovered
    • 2008 February 17, Randy Kennedy, “Where You Going With That Monet?”, New York Times:
      Speculation has run high for years that the crime, still unsolved and the art unrecovered, might have been carried out by the organization of James “Whitey” Bulger, the Boston crime boss, who remains a fugitive.
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  59. untempted
    • 2008 February 17, David Rieff, “Miracle Workers?”, New York Times:
      But the fact that someone so untempted by mystical inclinations could in an important sense be sustained by what was in part a mystical relationship is emblematic of the extraordinary demands that, in extremis, patients cannot help making — demands that are as impossible for doctors to fulfill as they are impossible for patients to forgo.
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Sequestered[edit]

  1. tourer
    • 2008 February 17, Rob Sass, “Mediocrity Killed the Cat”, New York Times:
      Following up the XJS grand tourer, which many people at the time thought was oddly styled, the XJ40 sedan cemented the opinion of many auto publications that Jaguar had lost its way.
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