User:Visviva/NYT 20080224

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This is a list of lowercase non-hyphenated single words found in the 2008-02-24 issue of the New York Times which did not have English entries in the English Wiktionary when this list was created (2009-03-03).

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200681 tokens ‧ 147063 valid lowercase tokens ‧ 14692 types ‧ 129 (~ 0.878%) words before cleaning ‧ 

2008-02-24[edit]

  1. acetylcarnitine
    • 2009 2009-03-03, Peter Lueders, “Feed Your Face”, New York Times:
      l6 Her mostly organic diet is supplemented with black-currant oil, acetylcarnitine and silica capsules.
      add
  2. airgaps
    • 2008 February 24, Michael Fitzgerald, “Trying to Put New Zip Into Moore’s Law”, New York Times:
      In this case, self-assembly involves creating so-called airgaps, vacuums a few nanometers wide that keep the billions of tiny copper wires in a chip from touching one another, instead of putting down a layer of insulating material and trying to align it effectively at the nanoscale.
      add
  3. amla
    • 2009 2009-03-03, Peter Lueders, “Feed Your Face”, New York Times:
      l9 Martyn’s Amla Purifying Cleanser contains papaya enzyme, salicylic acid and amla, an Indian gooseberry that’s packed with vitamin C.
      add
  4. anticoagulation
    • 2008 February 24, Lisa Sanders, M.D., “Patient Is a Virtue”, New York Times:
      It was unlikely given the patient’s age and the absence of chest pain, but if he had torn his aorta, anticoagulation could cause the patient to bleed to death.
      add
  5. anticoalition
    • 2008 February 24, Elizabeth Rubin, “Battle Company Is Out There”, New York Times:
      — anticoalition militants — “ ‘who are my brothers and I’m not gonna rat them out.’ ”
      add
  6. aristos
    • 2008 February 24, James Kaplan, “Reader, He Married Her”, New York Times:
      This is a beautiful world of enlightened aristos, the kind of people who know not only wine but Italian art and, to a great extent, themselves.
      add
  7. bijoux *
    • 2009 2009-03-03, Sandra Ballentine, “The New Collectibles”, New York Times, page 142:
      Besides highly collectible art and furniture, Claude Lalanne makes one-of-a-kind bijoux.
      add
  8. bimatoprost
    • 2009 2009-03-03, Alex Kuczynski, “Jeepers Peepers!”, New York Times:
      Some of the products contained small amounts of bimatoprost, an ingredient in the anti-glaucoma drug Lumigan, which is manufactured by Allergan.
      add
  9. blabla
    • 2009 2009-03-03, Caroline Weber, “Fashion Emergency”, New York Times:
      It means blabla can be anything.”
      add
  10. brachetto *
    • 2008 February 24, Howard G. Goldberg, “Vivacious and Versatile”, New York Times:
      Banfi’s low-alcohol (7 percent) brachetto, 2006 Rosa Regale, tastes sweet one moment, near-dry the next.
      add
  11. champak
    • 2009 2009-03-03, Sandra Ballentine, “IN – STORE”, New York Times, page 140:
      Yü, a limited-edition perfume from Mane, costs $5,000 and “contains rare, sustainably harvested plant essences like Indonesian champak and Mysore sandalwood.”
      add
  12. conservatoire
    • 2008 February 24, Matthew Gurewitsch, “A Big Year for a Full-Service Composer”, New York Times:
      In 1965, when Mr. Bolcom submitted his String Quartet No. 8 for the composition prize at the conservatoire, it placed second.
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  13. corbeled
    • 2008 February 24, Christopher Gray, “Once Exclusive Enclaves, Subject to Change”, New York Times:
      Some have small oriel windows in oval shapes resting on corbeled brickwork, laid in rows that gradually project from the facade.
      add
  14. counterbalancer
    • 2008 February 24, Dexter Ford, “Diesel-Sipping Motorcycle for the Marines”, New York Times:
      The footpegs and handlebars buzz as the engine revs — the counterbalancer that controls vibration in the stock KLR has been omitted to save weight and reduce complexity.
      add
  15. crimsoned
    • 2009 2009-03-03, Gioia Diliberto, “The Flapper Doesn’t Change Her Spots”, New York Times, page 192:
      In the glamorous studio shots taken by the Fox photographer Max Munn Autrey, who was famous for his soft, atmospheric portraits, we see an exceptionally pretty girl with round cheeks, a crimsoned bow mouth and huge brown eyes.
      add
  16. crostinis
    • 2008 February 24, “Deep-Fried Mars Bars”, New York Times:
      The menu at this new brick-walled wine bar features Italian snacks, including a nice selection of cheeses and salumi; and crostinis and small plates like sardines baked with fennel, pine nuts, raisins and pecorino; and pigs’ trotters with bread stuffing and chestnuts.
      add
  17. cura *
    • 2009 2009-03-03, S.S. Fair, “The Dirt Devil”, New York Times, page 148:
      Luca Blandi, Oscar’s brother and a hairstyling phenom, notes my happy exhalations and reminisces about growing up on the Gulf of Naples and taking the cura: “Men don’t normally go in for that sort of thing,” he confesses, “but I felt great afterward — my skin, my bones, everything.”
      add
  18. debaptize
    • 2009 2009-03-03, Chandler Burr, “L’Heir du Temps”, New York Times, page 174:
      So, to keep their secrets, they decided to debaptize them as medicines and call them eaux de senteurs.
      add
  19. detachedly
    • 2008 February 24, Roslyn Sulcas, “Unless You Have Another Word, Dance Will Do”, New York Times:
      In his second work, “Jérôme Bel,” four naked performers detachedly examine and manipulate their bodies, illuminated by a single light bulb, and eventually urinate onstage.
      add
  20. diaperish
    • 2009 2009-03-03, Christopher Petkanas, “Early Bloomers”, New York Times, page 102:
      Bloomers — sometimes diaperish, usually subversive and most women’s idea of fashion hell — produced smirks and double-takes in New York and Europe.
      add
  21. disparu *
    • 2009 2009-03-03, Chandler Burr, “L’Heir du Temps”, New York Times, page 174:
      Everyone knows Joy. What they don’t know are the four Patou perfumes before it — Adieu Sagesse, Que Sais-Je, Chaldée and Moment Supreme — and the four after, Normandie, Vacances, l’Heure Attendue (for the liberation of Paris) and Caline, which are all disparu.
      add
  22. distractible
    • 2008 February 24, Daniel Feikin, “Out of Kisumu”, New York Times:
      I was engaged in the daily morning struggle to get Bennie, our 4-year-old, and Yala, our distractible 2-year-old, mobilized for school.
      add
  23. divo *
    • 2008 February 24, The New York Times, “Some Kids, Some Stars, Some Season”, New York Times:
      Time for a new autograph book: Divas (and at least one divo) are converging on the New York theater.
      add
  24. dunderheaded
    • 2008 February 24, Joe Rhodes, “A Second Wind for a Professional Oaf”, New York Times:
      FRED WILLARD , who tends to go off on tangents, had finally gotten around to making his point, which was about a certain quality shared by many of his best-known characters, from the oblivious sidekick on “Fernwood 2-Night” to the scene-stealing announcer in the film “Best in Show” to his current gig as a dunderheaded sportscaster on the Fox sitcom “Back to You,” which returns this week from its strike-related layoff.
      add
  25. everydayness
    • 2008 February 24, Maud Newton, “Crisis Management”, New York Times:
      They depict characters in crisis, often so mired in what Walker Percy called the malaise of everydayness that the horror of their condition is invisible to them.
      add
  26. facture *
    • 2009 2009-03-03, “Kusama Dot Com”, New York Times, page 266:
      Unlike the Minimalists’ paintings, Kusama’s were never grid-based; in fact, it was her freehand facture, with its suggestion of slight swellings and rotations, that gave the nets their “dizzy, empty, hypnotic feeling,” as Kusama herself aptly described it.
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  27. filigreeing
    • 2008 February 24, Stacey D’Erasmo, “The Sound and the Führer”, New York Times:
      Whereas in “By Night in Chile” Bolaño’s dissection of hypocrisy and bad faith (the main character is a morally bankrupt priest allied with the junta) is swift and merciless, here it is not only as if the writer in him couldn’t keep himself from filigreeing in endless perfect and revealing details about his lost souls and their laughable oeuvres, but also as if he couldn’t entirely resist them.
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  28. footpegs
    • 2008 February 24, Dexter Ford, “Diesel-Sipping Motorcycle for the Marines”, New York Times:
      The footpegs and handlebars buzz as the engine revs — the counterbalancer that controls vibration in the stock KLR has been omitted to save weight and reduce complexity.
      add
  29. fragilities
    • 2009 2009-03-03, Gioia Diliberto, “The Flapper Doesn’t Change Her Spots”, New York Times, page 192:
      Silver-screen queens from Mabel Normand to Marilyn Monroe to Lindsay Lohan are scapegoats meant to embody the fragilities of the flesh.
      add
  30. frevo
    • 2008 February 24, Jon Pareles, “Recalling Romance, Brazilian Rock Beats and an Age-Old Harp”, New York Times:
      Musicians from Recife, Olinda and rural Pernambuco have concocted rock laced with funk; reggae; the local beats of maracatú and frevo; old rural songs; and the beats, burbles and scratches of electronica.
      add
  31. glamazonian
    • 2009 2009-03-03, Meenal Mistry, “My Muse?”, New York Times, page 120:
      Even as her recent collections have been lauded for their newfound restraint, Donatella’s platinum persona will always inform the line’s glamazonian look.
      add
  32. grecian
    • 2009 2009-03-03, “Toga Land”, New York Times, page 236:
      The grecian formula updated.
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  33. greenway
  34. grrlpower
  35. gurulike
    • 2009 2009-03-03, “Kusama Dot Com”, New York Times, page 266:
      Kusama herself, delighted by her escalating auction prices but paranoid about the least implication of indebtedness to any other artist, has retreated ever further into gurulike ambiguities.
      add
  36. gutful
    • 2008 February 24, Ruth Pennebaker, “We’re Big, We’re Back, We’re Texas”, New York Times:
      Maybe everybody else in the country thinks it’s a bit strange that just when Texans like George W. Bush , Karl Rove and Tom DeLay are packing up their big Republican tents and heading back to the Lone Star State — just when the country thought it had heard enough of Texans, seen enough of us, gotten a gutful of us — that we’re back, trying to call a few more shots.
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  37. hanbok
    • 2008 February 24, Bonnie Yochelson, “Pink Is for ...”, New York Times:
      Mass-produced items sit beside family keepsakes — the traditional Korean dress called the hanbok or a hand-me-down, smocked party dress.
      add
  38. haremlike
    • 2009 2009-03-03, Christopher Petkanas, “Early Bloomers”, New York Times, page 102:
      The bifurcated look had something weirdly haremlike about it and, however liberating, was light only in relation to what had come before.
      add
  39. hedgies
    • 2009 2009-03-03, Alice Rawsthorn, “Power Play”, New York Times, page 196:
      Despite the best, or worst, efforts of those overextended hedgies and subprime-sters, it did, but not as high as hems, and it yo-yoed squeamishly along the way.
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  40. hospitability
  41. injectible
    • 2009 2009-03-03, Susan Campos, “Anterior Motives”, New York Times:
      On a recent Friday morning in Los Angeles, a handful of eager women sat on sofas in the Sunset Boulevard offices of Dr. David Matlock noshing on bagels and cream cheese. Dr. Matlock, who made his name performing liposuction and then transplanting the fat to create a “Brazilian butt augmentation,” and who later went on to have a role on the reality show “Dr. 90210,” patiently explained the ins and outs of the injectible procedure of the moment, one that he claims to have invented and that makes Botox seem so five wrinkles ago.
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  42. ironize
    • 2008 February 24, Ben Marcus, “Don’t Go There”, New York Times:
      In “Zion,” Steiner examines the Jewish self-loathing of Wittgenstein and Simone Weil, then wonders: “If such Jews could ironize and repudiate their heritage, why should the outsider not do so?”
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  43. jackalope
    • 2008 February 24, David Colman, “Imagination Business Begins at Home”, New York Times:
      The fantastic creature is actually a lavish piece of jackalope wit: a spiral-contoured narwhal tusk grafted neatly to a horse head.
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  44. jazzhead
    • 2008 February 24, David Hajdu, “Jazz Man”, New York Times:
      He speaks to an audience definable not by its size nor even by its color but by its intellectual jazzhead zeal, and if he sometimes appears to be speaking only to himself, so be it; few people I know have the fervor for anything to match Mackey’s for jazz.
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  45. jumpstarted
    • 2008 February 24, Ben Brantley, “Come Back, Little ’50s, Even With the Clouds”, New York Times:
      This examination process was jumpstarted by the two great American dramas of the early postwar years, both from the late 1940s: Williams’s “Streetcar Named Desire” and Arthur Miller ’s “Death of a Salesman,” two very different but equally harsh portraits of shattered illusions.
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  46. kufis
    • 2008 February 24, David Hajdu, “Jazz Man”, New York Times:
      We think of past eras in a montage of changing modes of headwear: top hats ... fedoras ... kufis ... berets.
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  47. linocuts
    • 2008 February 24, Steven Heller, “Pretty Ugly”, New York Times:
      His bold pen-and-ink drawings, in the manner of woodcuts or linocuts, show a graphic side rarely seen.
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  48. megacompany
    • 2009 2009-03-03, Alex Hawgood, “Contributors”, New York Times, page 90:
      But don’t think that working for a megacompany comes at the cost of Capone’s imagination: “They always let me be experimental.”
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  49. metafictionists
    • 2008 February 24, David Hajdu, “Jazz Man”, New York Times:
      As a maker of such writing, he descends from a long line traceable from Whitman and Melville to the modernists and Mackey’s idol, Baraka, to the metafictionists John Barth and William Gass.
      add
  50. midcalf
    • 2009 2009-03-03, Suzy Menkes, “Slavs to Fashion”, New York Times:
      The obverse of that fashion coinage is the 1970s-style midcalf skirt that is making a tentative comeback.
      add
  51. milelong
    • 2008 February 24, Abby Goodnough, “Boston Has High Hopes Now That the Dig Is Done”, New York Times:
      Where the highway used to be is now a milelong green space with benches, fountains and fledgling trees ready to welcome pedestrians come spring.
      add
  52. misuser
    • 2008 February 24, Anthony Arthur, “Blood and ‘Oil!’”, New York Times:
      Modeled after the famous evangelist Aimee Semple McPherson, Eli is cunning, devious and ambitious, a gifted misuser of words that mislead and delude those who heed them.
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  53. mythmakers
    • 2008 February 24, Stacey D’Erasmo, “The Sound and the Führer”, New York Times:
      The mythmakers, he suggests, certainly do matter.
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  54. neoburlesque
    • 2009 2009-03-03, Horacio Silva, “The Talk”, New York Times:
      The state of being partially or very casually dressed, as in, “The teen star gives an extremely naked performance in the CW remake of ‘Bilitis,’ spending the entire movie in varying degrees of dishabille”; a front-row buzzword in a season in which designers have stripped back the silhouette to its conceptual, neoburlesque bare bones, e.g., “The collection was very mid-’90s Madonna dishabille in Seville meets Dita Von Teese in Greece.”
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  55. neology
    • 2008 February 24, William Safire, “Bird-Dog Minute”, New York Times:
      The word burned through the thin, dry-timbered wall of political neology in 1984, as Senator John Glenn ’s campaign manager in South Carolina , John Lawson, told the A.P. that Glenn’s campaign “considered six Deep South states to be the crucial states for Glenn — the fire wall, if you will, between Mondale and the nomination.”
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  56. nonevangelicals
  57. nonscripted
  58. nontourist
    • 2008 February 24, “An Approach to Cuba”, New York Times:
      None have called for returning to nontourist people-to-people initiatives as flourished before 2004, not to mention restoring to all Americans our constitutional and human right of freedom to travel.
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  59. nonvulgar
    • 2008 February 24, Stacey D’Erasmo, “The Sound and the Führer”, New York Times:
      Like Leni Riefenstahl , the artistes Bolaño invents share a certain Romantic aesthetic, a taste for the classic and nonvulgar, a dislike of “cacophony” and a lurking sense that something has gone terribly wrong in the modern world — that children, for instance, have been “stolen and raised by inferior races” and that a better world in the form of the Fourth Reich is imminent.
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  60. oakmoss
    • 2009 2009-03-03, Chandler Burr, “L’Heir du Temps”, New York Times, page 174:
      Also, a slew of perfume materials are now either banned or restricted as toxic (like oakmoss, the centerpiece of the 1917 Le Chypre de Coty) or morally indefensible (like real musk, which requires shooting the animal to obtain it).
      add
  61. overharvesting
  62. pathbreaker
    • 2008 February 24, Nicholas D. Kristof, “Obama’s Kenyan Roots”, New York Times:
      The father, also named Barack Hussein Obama, was as much of a pathbreaker as his son.
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  63. pathologization
    • 2009 2009-03-03, Kara Jesella, “Certifiably Chic”, New York Times:
      She calls them “a pathologization of femininity.”
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  64. peacockery
    • 2009 2009-03-03, Alex Kuczynski, “Jeepers Peepers!”, New York Times:
      Designed by nature to be the simple shrubbery that protects the cornea from dust and small particles, the humble strip of cilia has evolved into an object of sensual fascination, aesthetic peacockery and, most recently, federal concern of such magnitude that the F.D.A. and a squadron of marshals were forced to intervene.
      add
  65. penlike
    • 2008 February 24, Rob Walker, “Tag Sale”, New York Times:
      Over time, Costello started working with a manufacturer to make $10 “squeeze markers” (a bit like a shoe-polish bottle) and more penlike markers with wide tips ($8) that fill with ink through a pump-action mechanism.
      add
  66. personism
  67. popsy
    • 2008 February 24, Matthew Gurewitsch, “A Big Year for a Full-Service Composer”, New York Times:
      “This is when everyone’s talking about Boulez and Stockhausen and the total chromatic,” Mr. Bolcom said recently from home in Ann Arbor, Mich., “and here’s this popsy little number extolling the virtue of bombs.
      add
  68. postpractice
    • 2008 February 24, Joe Lapointe, “With Chamberlain Around, Yanks Find Little Peace”, New York Times:
      TAMPA, Fla. — Joba Chamberlain recently tried to involve his fellow pitcher Mike Mussina in some postpractice recreation in the Yankees ’ clubhouse.
      add
  69. precampaign
    • 2008 February 24, Eleanor Randolph, “It’s Law & Order”, New York Times:
      Reruns revive the old Fred Thompson in all his precampaign savvy.
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  70. proenza
    • 2009 2009-03-03, “Profile in Style: Chloe Sevigny”, New York Times, page 244:
      “I think they are attracted to my sanity.” her 30th-birthday invite. right: with the designers of proenza schouler.
      add
  71. proletarianism
    • 2008 February 24, Dave Marsh, “Out on Highway 61”, New York Times:
      The seekers, some in the service of white supremacy, some operating under the banner of Popular Front proletarianism, some in the thrall of art for art’s sake, hoped to locate the one true voice of the Negro in the deepest, darkest South.
      add
  72. regentrified
  73. saudades
    • 2008 February 24, Matthew Gurewitsch, “A Big Year for a Full-Service Composer”, New York Times:
      Milhaud wore his learning lightly, wrote with ease in styles both popular and arcane and was never above blending jazz, saudades or other exotic flavors into his spicy brew.
      add
  74. schouler
    • 2009 2009-03-03, “Profile in Style: Chloe Sevigny”, New York Times, page 244:
      “I think they are attracted to my sanity.” her 30th-birthday invite. right: with the designers of proenza schouler.
      add
  75. scumfest
    • 2009 2009-03-03, S.S. Fair, “The Dirt Devil”, New York Times, page 148:
      Cinnamon-colored mud/blood spurts and spatters everywhere, turning my clean bathroom into a scumfest.
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  76. semicustomized
  77. soaper
    • 2008 February 24, Ben Brantley, “Come Back, Little ’50s, Even With the Clouds”, New York Times:
      Certainly a taste for vintage domestic drama has already surfaced with the popular “August: Osage County,” Tracy Letts ’s super-size dysfunctional-family soaper, which, as a friend of mine put it, gives you “five William Inge plots for the price of one.”
      add
  78. sportif *
    • 2009 2009-03-03, Meenal Mistry, “My Muse?”, New York Times, page 120:
      The strategically placed pineapples have given way to luxury sportif, without the leather.
      add
  79. stearyl
    • 2009 2009-03-03, Chandler Burr, “L’Heir du Temps”, New York Times, page 174:
      But it’s even more complicated, he adds; it used stearyl acetate, then a state-of-the-art perfume molecule that smells like raw hazelnut.
      add
  80. stilettoed
    • 2009 2009-03-03, Alex Hawgood, “The Roitfelds”, New York Times:
      Many consider Roitfeld the stilettoed embodiment of modern dressing: she describes her style as “tacky chic.”
      add
  81. streetwear
    • 2009 2009-03-03, Armand Limnander, “Georgia Peach”, New York Times, page 146:
      Recently expanded, the James Gunn store features smart streetwear by labels like Ed Hardy, AKA New York and Corey Lynn Calter, as well as furnishings — glass chandeliers, hanging nest chairs and quirky gifts.
      add
  82. superaffluent
    • 2008 February 24, Josh Barbanel, “Combine and Conquer”, New York Times:
      But the penthouses languished on the market, until he began marketing them as combined space for superaffluent buyers.
      add
  83. superchic
    • 2008 February 24, Suzanne Slesin, “Never the Twain Shall Meet”, New York Times:
      If I lived there, I might not have to leave the apartment too often and brave running into any of my superchic, supertoned neighbors.
      add
  84. superheavyweight
    • 2008 February 24, Randall Stross, “Maybe Microsoft Should Stalk Different Prey”, New York Times:
      OVER the years, Microsoft has pummeled countless rivals, including the superheavyweight I.B.M. But it has never faced a smaller foe as formidable as Google .
      add
  85. superscale
    • 2008 February 24, Christopher Gray, “Once Exclusive Enclaves, Subject to Change”, New York Times:
      Some houses have very large arched windows on the ground floor and, paired with the matching window on a mirror-image neighbor, make a superscale statement.
      add
  86. supershine
    • 2009 2009-03-03, “The Color Purple”, New York Times, page 162:
      The finishing touch is a layer of supershine to give the lips the lacquered quality of a child’s toy.
      add
  87. supersoft
    • 2009 2009-03-03, Sandra Ballentine, “IN – STORE”, New York Times, page 140:
      LnA’s supersoft cotton V-necks ($59) fit her to a tee.
      add
  88. supertoned
    • 2008 February 24, Suzanne Slesin, “Never the Twain Shall Meet”, New York Times:
      If I lived there, I might not have to leave the apartment too often and brave running into any of my superchic, supertoned neighbors.
      add
  89. swagged
    • 2009 2009-03-03, Suzy Menkes, “Slavs to Fashion”, New York Times:
      Even my hotel, which I remembered not so fondly as the glum Intourist, had been razed and reborn as the Ritz-Carlton, now a gilded palace swagged with chandeliers.
      add
  90. toeless
    • 2009 2009-03-03, Kara Jesella, “Certifiably Chic”, New York Times:
      Shot by Steven Meisel, it’s a cruelly amusing sendup of spectacular flameouts like Britney, Lindsay and Amy, as their fashion proxies stage wild-eyed insurrections clad in toeless Prada tights, attend group therapy in little black dresses, loll about expressionless and do topless yoga.
      add
  91. tonka
    • 2009 2009-03-03, Chandler Burr, “Radical, Chic”, New York Times:
      So he used hay essence, tonka bean (a flavoring in tobacco), maté from South America, galbanum (a raw green) and sage.
      add
  92. tubathons
    • 2008 February 24, Michael Pollak, “Bar Babies”, New York Times:
      “We don’t turn anybody away because of their age,” he said, adding that performers in his tubathons had ranged from 9 to 98 years.
      add
  93. tulsi
    • 2009 2009-03-03, Peter Lueders, “Feed Your Face”, New York Times:
      “Also called holy basil, tulsi is known as the queen of herbs in ayurvedic medicine; it helps reduce inflammation associated with aging and disease.”
      add
  94. unfilmed
    • 2008 February 24, “Profane Poet”, New York Times:
      A later unelaborated gem led me to scribble this note: “David Mamet wrote an unfilmed screenplay about the life of Malcolm X ?”
      add
  95. unregenerately
    • 2008 February 24, Caryn James, “A Fire in the Heart”, New York Times:
      While Meera’s own father cultivated Muslim friends, Dev’s family is unregenerately bigoted against them.
      add
  96. vaginoplasty
    • 2009 2009-03-03, Susan Campos, “Anterior Motives”, New York Times:
      Unfazed by controversy, Dr. Matlock, who is also a guru in the field of laser vaginoplasty, is a difficult appointment to book.
      add
  97. verjus
    • 2008 February 24, Amanda Hesser, “1876: New Jersey Blanc Mange”, New York Times:
      Make the fruit compote: in a medium saucepan, whisk together the verjus, cider, sugar and vanilla pod and seeds.
      add
  98. vizsla
    • 2008 February 24, William Safire, “Bird-Dog Minute”, New York Times:
      A bird dog, according to David Smith of the National Bird Dog Museum, can include such breeds as the English pointer and setter, the American Brittany, the German short-haired pointer and the vizsla.
      add
  99. workwear
    • 2009 2009-03-03, Suzy Menkes, “Slavs to Fashion”, New York Times:
      Same story at McCartney, where coveralls brought a workwear edge to the posies.
      add
  100. woundedness
    • 2009 2009-03-03, Daphne Merkin, “Heel, Girl!”, New York Times:
      By then I realized he was a closet romantic, ashamed of his own longings (heels are good at exuding a complex aura of woundedness and receptiveness) and waiting for someone like me to come along to intuit and fulfill them.
      add
  101. yeow
    • 2008 February 24, David Carr, “Oh, Just Lighten Up and Enjoy the Show”, New York Times:
      We watched Anna Paquin , then all of 11, win best supporting actress, sat through a series of interpretive dances keyed to the best-picture nominees — yeow — and then stared in a mix of wonder and horror as Tom Hanks said “the streets of heaven are too crowded with angels” when he won for “Philadelphia.”
      add

Sequestered[edit]

  1. cliiiiff
  2. frieeends
  3. wellll