User:Visviva/NYT 20080302

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This is a list of lowercase non-hyphenated single words found in the 2008-03-02 issue of the New York Times which did not have English entries in the English Wiktionary when this list was created (2009-03-03).

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179385 tokens ‧ 131492 valid lowercase tokens ‧ 13163 types ‧ 86 (~ 0.653%) words before cleaning ‧ 

2008-03-02[edit]

  1. antibusiness
    • 2008 March 2, Ben Stein, “Exxon Mobil Needs a Hug”, New York Times:
      I know Democratic candidates have to make obeisance to the populist, antibusiness wing of their party, just as the Republican front-runner, Senator John McCain , has to make bows and curtsies to the supply-side part of his (and my) party.
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  2. apfelstrudel
    • 2008 March 2, Lawrence Ulrich, “Traveling on Dual Passports”, New York Times:
      Failing to penetrate General Motors’ secure corporate sanctum, I’m forced to imagine the signs of culture shock: apfelstrudel has replaced Krispy Kremes at morning meetings.
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  3. arack
    • 2008 March 2, Adam Lebor, “The Confession”, New York Times:
      At expensive restaurants, Yalo feeds her wine and arack, cuttlefish and red mullet, but Shirin keeps her distance.
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  4. aristos
    • 2008 March 2, “Editor’s Choice”, New York Times:
      Set in a world of enlightened WASP aristos, this sunny lemon chiffon pie of a novel is dedicated to the proposition of perfect romantic love.
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  5. atomlike
    • 2008 March 2, Hilary Howard, “Datebook”, New York Times:
      In celebration of this — and of the recent renovation of the Atomium, an atomlike structure built for the fair — the Atomium (www.atomium.be ) will be host of a variety of programs within its exhibition spheres.
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  6. ballhandler
    • 2008 March 2, Robert Weintraub, “Such Madness”, New York Times:
      Excellent ballhandler and playmaker in the transition game, with a freakish ability to stay confident and in control in all situations.
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  7. befuddlingly
    • 2008 March 2, Alan Schwarz, “Bradley Says He Is Who He Is, So Just Get Over It”, New York Times:
      Among his peers, Bradley is known as a bright, fiercely loyal teammate who can one minute talk United States foreign policy but the next be befuddlingly aloof.
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  8. breathiness
    • 2008 March 2, Virginia Heffernan, “Speak, ‘Tootsie’”, New York Times:
      If you dared, and if you had had any luck doing Princess Leia (Obi-Wan Kenobi, you’re my only hope), you might even hazard Jessica Lange ’s tearful vanilla-rose breathiness: I really love you, Dorothy, but I can’t love you.
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  9. bubblelike
    • 2008 March 2, Robert J. Shiller, “How a Bubble Stayed Under the Radar”, New York Times:
      They found that these cascades can affect even perfectly rational people and cause bubblelike phenomena.
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  10. carmelizing
    • 2008 March 2, Amanda Stern, “The Cat Drinks Absinthe”, New York Times:
      “I’m carmelizing the sugar,” he explained, “so it mixes better with the absinthe.”
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  11. chiva *
    • 2008 March 2, Tanzina Vega, “A Taste of Colombia Rolls Through New York’s Streets”, New York Times:
      “By the time the bus crosses the bridge, everybody is friends,” said Sorady Cortes, 28, a physical therapist out with some girlfriends, as she waited for the chiva to start its engine in Queens and head west over the Queensboro Bridge and into Midtown Manhattan.
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  12. chivas
  13. craftlike
    • 2008 March 2, Christopher Gray, “Crowning Achievements for Two Brother-Architects”, New York Times:
      The dusty-pink replacement windows, although thoughtfully designed, have much larger panes and a machine-made character, in contrast to the craftlike work on the rest of the building.
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  14. cragger
    • 2008 March 2, Bruce Barcott, “The Higher They Climb”, New York Times:
      An athletic kid from New Jersey, Fischer was known as a bold risk taker — they called him “the fallingest man in climbing” — until an old-school cragger taught him the Zen of controlled ascent.
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  15. crookery
    • 2008 March 2, Marc Weingarten, “Savage Detectives”, New York Times:
      He remains a master of transforming crookery into opera.
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  16. cupholder
    • 2008 March 2, Lawrence Ulrich, “German Cousins Seeking Citizenship”, New York Times:
      Some of the Astra’s exotica may confuse or vex American buyers: a single cupholder seems positioned to be shared — or fought over — by front and rear occupants.
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  17. debutantehood
    • 2008 March 2, Anthony Ramirez, “At the Plaza, Restoring Life Lived Luxuriously”, New York Times:
      The property is really famous: F. Scott Fitzgerald set scenes from his most celebrated novel there, Alfred Hitchcock filmed a scene from one of his most acclaimed movies there, and countless debutantes reached the summit of their debutantehood there.
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  18. dogfaces
    • 2008 March 2, David Michaelis, “‘He Drew Great Mud’”, New York Times:
      Mauldin listened to his fellow dogfaces in their foxholes and sketched quickly, sometimes rendering finished work on the back of whatever scrap he could find in the rubble.
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  19. drunkorexia
    • 2008 March 2, Sarah Kershaw, “Starving Themselves, Cocktail in Hand”, New York Times:
      The latest entry in the lexicon of food-related ills is drunkorexia, shorthand for a disturbing blend of behaviors: self-imposed starvation or bingeing and purging, combined with alcohol abuse .
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  20. drunkorexics
    • 2008 March 2, Sarah Kershaw, “Starving Themselves, Cocktail in Hand”, New York Times:
      Among those who are described as drunkorexics are college-age binge drinkers, typically women, who starve all day to offset the calories in the alcohol they consume.
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  21. eponymy
    • 2008 March 2, William Safire, “Transformative”, New York Times:
      Lawsuits and shoot-’em-ups are said to have followed, but the result was a triumph of eponymy: the cattleman’s name, Maverick, became the word for an animal that bore nobody’s brand.
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  22. evermorphing
    • 2008 March 2, Jennifer Steinhauer, “I’ll Have a Big Mac, Serenity on the Side”, New York Times:
      In the evermorphing county, the feng shui McDonald’s, as it has quickly become known, is “a perfect example” of global capitalism’s co-opting people’s cultures, said Gilda L. Ochoa, an associate professor of sociology and Latino studies at Pomona College, who grew up here in the 1970s.
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  23. fallingest
    • 2008 March 2, Bruce Barcott, “The Higher They Climb”, New York Times:
      An athletic kid from New Jersey, Fischer was known as a bold risk taker — they called him “the fallingest man in climbing” — until an old-school cragger taught him the Zen of controlled ascent.
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  24. floodlighted
    • 2008 March 2, Virginia Heffernan, “Speak, ‘Tootsie’”, New York Times:
      Hoffman first appears in a montage of floodlighted stages, clutching audition scripts and fielding unwanted direction.
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  25. gelaterias
    • 2008 March 2, Joy Goodwin, “Left Coast Ideas, Floating East”, New York Times:
      Forty years later, in a bustling downtown with more than its share of students, homeless people and gelaterias, Berkeley Rep occupies two sleek, custom-built theaters.
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  26. hatlessness
    • 2008 March 2, Alexia Webster, “The Hatters”, New York Times:
      He argues that hats began losing popularity long before Kennedy, that “by the mid-1920s, hatlessness was a major problem for the industry, which was in free fall by the late 1940s and early 1950s.”
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  27. heisters
    • 2008 March 2, Terrence Rafferty, “Will the Heist Work? Will the Movie?”, New York Times:
      And although some of the cinema’s many diligent heisters do manage to get away with their spoils, most of them sooner or later come to grief.
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  28. hiccuppy
    • 2008 March 2, Benjamin Black, “The Lemur”, New York Times:
      Cleaver had a high-pitched, hiccuppy laugh.
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  29. huppah
  30. hyperfast
    • 2008 March 2, Stephen Kotkin, “Now Comes the Tough Part in Russia”, New York Times:
      Still, as in his earlier books on the same subject, whose idée fixe is the supposed superiority of hyperfast and hyperradical reform, whatever the circumstances, Mr. Aslund can claim two important achievements.
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  31. hyperradical
    • 2008 March 2, Stephen Kotkin, “Now Comes the Tough Part in Russia”, New York Times:
      Still, as in his earlier books on the same subject, whose idée fixe is the supposed superiority of hyperfast and hyperradical reform, whatever the circumstances, Mr. Aslund can claim two important achievements.
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  32. kufi
  33. kurtas
    • 2008 March 2, James Angelos, “God’s Row”, New York Times:
      As Hindu faithful in colorful saris and kurtas filed out the temple’s tinted glass doors, shouts of “Gloria a Dios!” drifted into the street from the whitewashed Iglesia de Dios Pentecostal next door.
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  34. linerblack
    • 2008 March 2, Frances Richey, “Inventory”, New York Times:
      socks ... green/black PTs — shorts, shirts for workout SPEAR silk underwear for cold weather SPEAR body armor ... ergonomically correct barracks bag for laundry rain poncho and linerblack wool cap
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  35. literalization
    • 2008 March 2, Randy Kennedy, “Accusations, Depositions: Just More Fodder for Art”, New York Times:
      Looked at one way, parts of that metaproject that were displayed in December at Art Basel Miami Beach could be seen as a kind of literalization of art for art’s sake.
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  36. malva *
    • 2008 March 2, “To Sip and Nibble”, New York Times:
      Small dishes include smoked snoek pâté, a couple of South African meat stews; fried meat turnovers called vetkoek; and desserts like malva pudding, a yellow cake made with apricot jam, which visitors to South Africa will recognize.
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  37. mediawise
  38. memorizable
    • 2008 March 2, Virginia Heffernan, “Speak, ‘Tootsie’”, New York Times:
      Watch it just once, and you’ll find it eminently memorizable, quotable, performable.
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  39. metaproject
    • 2008 March 2, Randy Kennedy, “Accusations, Depositions: Just More Fodder for Art”, New York Times:
      Looked at one way, parts of that metaproject that were displayed in December at Art Basel Miami Beach could be seen as a kind of literalization of art for art’s sake.
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  40. midheist
    • 2008 March 2, Terrence Rafferty, “Will the Heist Work? Will the Movie?”, New York Times:
      And after the somber “Rififi,” with its famous silent heist sequence (the French crooks are so serious they don’t speak a word for half an hour) and its brutally unhappy ending, there was Mario Monicelli ’s goofy “Big Deal on Madonna Street” (1958), which features a robbery very like that of “Rififi” but considerably less laconic: the thieves bicker constantly, take a midheist break to wolf down some spaghetti and bungle the job so badly that in the end they leave the safe uncracked and just drift home.
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  41. minimumweight
    • 2008 March 2, The Associated Press, “Niida Wins in Title Defense”, New York Times:
      The Japanese boxer Yutaka Niida stopped the challenger José Varela of Venezuela in the sixth round on in Tokyo to defend his W.B.A. minimumweight title.
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  42. multihospital
    • 2008 March 2, “Jessica Clement, Jordan Greenbaum”, New York Times:
      The bridegroom, 32, is a fourth-year resident in orthopedic surgery at Massachusetts General Hospital as part of a multihospital rotation under Harvard’s combined orthopedic residency program.
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  43. nonguests
    • 2008 March 2, Allen Salkin, “SoHo Meets HoJo in Atlantic City”, New York Times:
      While overnight guests at the Chelsea will be welcome to roam at will around the fifth floor, there will also be a street entrance with doormen eyeballing nonguests hoping to pay their way into the party.
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  44. nonpark
    • 2008 March 2, Joyce Cohen, “Happenstance Can Help”, New York Times:
      Units with views of McCarren Park were more expensive, so he chose one on the nonpark side for $499,000.
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  45. nonwage
    • 2008 March 2, Gretchen Morgenson, “The Buck Has Stopped”, New York Times:
      TrimTabs calls its new measure the Consumer Spendables Indicator, and it sensibly includes these crucial sources of consumption cash: after-tax wages; after-tax income from nonwage sources, like capital gains, dividends, pensions, partnerships and self-employment; and net equity extraction from consumers’ homes, either through property sales or mortgage refinancing.
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  46. nutcakes
  47. overbroad
    • 2008 March 2, The Associated Press, “Limits Upheld on Sonar Use in Navy Tests”, New York Times:
      Cindy Moore, said Saturday that officials were “heartened” by the decision because it “at least temporarily provides us some relief from the district court’s overbroad injunction.”
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  48. overinterpret
    • 2008 March 2, Andrew C. Revkin, “Skeptics on Human Climate Impact Seize on Cold Spell”, New York Times:
      Some scientists who strongly disagree with each other on the extent of warming coming in this century, and on what to do about it, agreed that it was important not to be tempted to overinterpret short-term swings in climate, either hot or cold.
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  49. overslowed
    • 2008 March 2, Tommy Craggs, “Quick in His Seat”, New York Times:
      As a student, Cook recalls, Stewart “attacked” the corners: “He never overslowed the car.
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  50. panisses
    • 2008 March 2, “To Sip and Nibble”, New York Times:
      France is represented by the sandwich known as pan-bagnat, and panisses (chickpea fries), which share the menu with crispy chickpea pancakes called socca; warm calamari and potato salad; and a selection of salumi, pizzas and pasta.
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  51. pourings
  52. recarve
    • 2008 March 2, Tracie Rozhon, “Preserving the Best of the Old”, New York Times:
      He speaks about working with craftsmen to recarve both wood and plaster at the New Amsterdam Theater, and he is the project manager for the Theater for a New Audience, which is planned for a site near the Brooklyn Academy of Music .
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  53. redly
    • 2008 March 2, James Campbell, “Dark Art”, New York Times:
      To one I’d added a nautilus shell, to one a compact disc with the word Memorex printed across it (and the sun shining redly through the hole), to the third a dead seagull I’d found on the beach, only blown up to pterodactyl size.
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  54. rejecter
    • 2008 March 2, Adam Freedman, “The Object of His Rejection”, New York Times:
      Hillary Clinton had been urging Mr. Obama to be a rejecter, not just a denouncer, at least where Mr. Farrakhan was concerned.
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  55. seniorhood
    • 2008 March 2, Bryan Curtis, “The Free Agent Adjusts His Truss”, New York Times:
      Not long ago, the three of us sat down to lunch in Phoenix, the site of the Senior Softball World Championships, which Gil was attending with his team, New Concepts (named after a construction company and not, as I hoped, an optimistic comment on the possibilities of seniorhood).
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  56. sestinas
  57. socca
    • 2008 March 2, “To Sip and Nibble”, New York Times:
      France is represented by the sandwich known as pan-bagnat, and panisses (chickpea fries), which share the menu with crispy chickpea pancakes called socca; warm calamari and potato salad; and a selection of salumi, pizzas and pasta.
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  58. softballer
  59. softballers
    • 2008 March 2, Bryan Curtis, “The Free Agent Adjusts His Truss”, New York Times:
      Before the tournament, he wrenched his hamstring — one of the more common injuries among 70-year-old softballers, whose muscles tend to stiffen at roughly 1,000 times the rate of those of 30-year-olds.
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  60. splatting
    • 2008 March 2, Hilary Howard, “Nickelodeon to Open Theme Park in Mall”, New York Times:
      Another roller coaster, the Avatar Airbender, reaches a height of 70 feet and takes riders through the curl of a wave, while the Splat-O-Sphere takes riders almost 60 feet high before bringing them back downwards again and stopping just short of ... well, splatting.
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  61. spoked
    • 2008 March 2, Christine Kenneally, “Giddyap”, New York Times:
      In “The Horse, the Wheel, and Language,” David W. Anthony argues that we speak English not just because our parents taught it to us but because wild horses used to roam the steppes of central Eurasia, because steppe-dwellers invented the spoked wheel and because poetry once had real power.
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  62. streetier
    • 2008 March 2, Charles Mcgrath, “Sleepy-Eyed Writer, Wandering Byzantium”, New York Times:
      Now 58, Mr. Price published his first book, “The Wanderers,” set in the blue-collar Bronx of his childhood, when he was just 24 and barely out of Cornell — from which he emerged, he has said, even streetier and more Bronx-sounding than when he began — and the M.F.A. program at Columbia, where his models were Hubert Selby and Lenny Bruce .
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  63. subfertile
    • 2008 March 2, “Paperback Row”, New York Times:
      Orenstein, a journalist who writes about family issues, unsparingly revisits her sojourn in the community of the subfertile.
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  64. textilelike
    • 2008 March 2, Christopher Gray, “Crowning Achievements for Two Brother-Architects”, New York Times:
      They quickly developed a trademark apartment-house design, with textilelike facades of tapestry brick, and tile and terra cotta in intricate designs.
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  65. transponding
    • 2008 March 2, Alison Goldfrapp, “Feeling Up, Feeling Young, Feeling Good”, New York Times:
      Will told me I have to say, “Any record that puts the vocals through a transponding vocoder is good for me.”
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  66. unmedicated
    • 2008 March 2, Pamela Paul, “And the Doula Makes Four”, New York Times:
      “I wanted a natural, unmedicated birth,” said Ms. Myers, whose daughter was born in 2004.
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  67. unpierced
  68. unscreechy
    • 2008 March 2, “Grande Dame”, New York Times:
      The tone of your book is surprisingly unscreechy, particularly for a panelist on “The McLaughlin Group,” where your most familiar refrain is surely: “Let me finish.
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  69. unsettingly
    • 2008 March 2, Mary Roach, “I, Guppy”, New York Times:
      (The transition line on the logo runs unsettingly lengthwise, rather than across the waist, mermaid-style.
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  70. verjus
    • 2008 March 2, Howard G. Goldberg, “To Accompany Asparagus”, New York Times:
      Coat the greens only with verjus, the slightly tart juice of unripe grapes.
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  71. videocams
    • 2008 March 2, Charles Mcgrath, “Sleepy-Eyed Writer, Wandering Byzantium”, New York Times:
      The landscape in this case — the subject of the book, really — is the Lower East Side, which Mr. Price depicts as a neighborhood of colliding populations: the few remaining Jewish old-timers; the people from the projects; the La Bohèmers, as he calls them, the trust-fund couples with their M.F.A.’s and videocams; the Chinese immigrants, many of them illegal, who sleep, stacked on shelves, in some of the old tenements.
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  72. watchcase
    • 2008 March 2, Valerie Cotsalas, “Deluxe Future for Sag Harbor Site?”, New York Times:
      Over on Main Street, a few blocks from the old watchcase factory, Theodore Conklin, owner of the American Hotel, said the village would lose more than luxury condominiums if the developers dropped their plan.
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  73. wedgied
    • 2008 March 2, Dwight Garner, “Inside the List”, New York Times:
      “Even a tepid review by The Times is like the little geekette in glasses getting wedgied by the big, handsome quarterback,” she wrote.
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  74. yestiddy
    • 2008 March 2, David Michaelis, “‘He Drew Great Mud’”, New York Times:
      Willie squeezes his partner’s shoulder as the two huddle in a rain-filled foxhole: “Joe, yestiddy ya saved my life an’ I swore I’d pay ya back.
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  75. zabumba
    • 2008 March 2, Joyce Cohen, “Happenstance Can Help”, New York Times:
      Still, the bedrooms were next to each other, which wasn’t ideal. Mr. Heller Chu plays the guitar as well as Brazilian percussion instruments, including the pandeiro and the zabumba, and his sound system would be set up in his room.
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Sequestered[edit]