User:Visviva/NYT 20080312

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This is a list of lowercase non-hyphenated single words found in the 2008-03-12 issue of the New York Times which did not have English entries in the English Wiktionary when this list was created (2009-03-03).

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124580 tokens ‧ 91052 valid lowercase tokens ‧ 10165 types ‧ 38 (~ 0.374%) words before cleaning ‧ 

2008-03-12[edit]

  1. backrub
  2. bigos
    • 2008 March 12, “Letters”, New York Times:
      It was a pleasure to read about Louis Begley ’s version of bigos, the traditional Polish Hunter’s Stew (“A Stew With a Past and a Future,” Feb. 27).
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  3. boiserie *
    • 2008 March 12, Geraldine Fabrikant, “Re-Enter the Gilded Age”, New York Times:
      For one, the Wallace Collection does not own rooms of boiserie, as does the Metropolitan, which can help evoke palace rooms as they might have originally appeared.
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  4. boucherie *
    • 2008 March 12, Frank Bruni, “3. Cochon”, New York Times:
      The restaurant’s name is French for pig, and one aim of the chefs Donald Link and Stephen Stryjewski, who own and operate Cochon, is to honor a Cajun tradition of whole-pig boucherie, producing cured, smoked, pressed and shredded delicacies.
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  5. cochon *
    • 2008 March 12, Frank Bruni, “3. Cochon”, New York Times:
      The version of suckling pig, listed on the menu as “Louisiana cochon with turnips, cabbage and cracklins” ($22), might as well be fried, considering how the slow-stewed meat is molded and packed into what then becomes a golden, crisp-edged, fatty puck: a gargantuan pig latke, more or less.
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  6. codebreaking
    • 2008 March 12, Peter Wayner, “Psst! Follow Me and I’ll Show You the Exhibition”, New York Times:
      Most museums are built from the urge to broadcast the past loud and clear, but most museums do not receive money from the National Security Agency , the arm of the intelligence network devoted to codemaking and codebreaking.
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  7. codemaking
    • 2008 March 12, Peter Wayner, “Psst! Follow Me and I’ll Show You the Exhibition”, New York Times:
      Most museums are built from the urge to broadcast the past loud and clear, but most museums do not receive money from the National Security Agency , the arm of the intelligence network devoted to codemaking and codebreaking.
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  8. cryptophones
    • 2008 March 12, Peter Wayner, “Psst! Follow Me and I’ll Show You the Exhibition”, New York Times:
      The bulky refrigerator-size boxes that scrambled the phone discussions of Roosevelt and Churchill are just steps from the hefty cryptophones of the 1970s and more modern versions.
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  9. datedly
    • 2008 March 12, Bernard Holland, “Music in Review”, New York Times:
      Written as part of Mr. Rzewski’s “North American Ballads” in 1979 and based on a song from the 1930s, “Winnsboro” is radical, if somewhat datedly so, in its politics as well as in its technique.
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  10. deadset
  11. flightworthy
    • 2008 March 12, Marcelle S. Fischler, “Looking Back at World War II From 3,000 Feet”, New York Times:
      Nearly a dozen flightworthy military aircraft and a volunteer troop of World War II re-enactors are part of the living history experience at the eight-year-old museum, once a Republic Aviation factory where 9,000 P-47 fighters were built during the war.
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  12. fromagers
    • 2008 March 12, Julia Moskin, “Your Waiter Tonight... Will Be the Chef”, New York Times:
      His words reflect a sensibility about food that also drives modern eaters to seek direct contact with farmers and fishers, fromagers and foragers.
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  13. frontloaded
    • 2008 March 12, Nate Chinen, “Brooding and Brute Force Are Here to Share the Stage”, New York Times:
      “Rykestrasse 68” has a brooding and quietly dramatic temperament, and it’s full of intricate sonic touches. Ms. Hukkelberg frontloaded her set with the album’s first three songs, beginning with “Berlin,” which derives its faint sense of forward motion from a methodical row of eighth notes on bass and guitar.
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  14. hornswogglers
    • 2008 March 12, Rachel Saltz, “Fudge, Humbug and O’Neill”, New York Times:
      It moves O’Neill’s dead past — 1906, in a “large small town” in Connecticut — to 1910 and paints the era in broad strokes as a place of whippersnappers, hornswogglers and fudge.
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  15. keywording
    • 2008 March 12, Philip Gefter, “Type in ‘Native American’ and Search (Someday) 13 Million Photos”, New York Times:
      Besides being able to search the photography collections, of which 3,000 images have been scanned in so far, the feature is meant to provide a more subjective and spontaneous way for visitors to view the art: browsing images, looking at them sequentially and keywording, or tagging, them for themselves and other viewers.
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  16. lullabylike
    • 2008 March 12, Bernard Holland, “Music in Review”, New York Times:
      The “Pastoral Symphony,” often milked for a lullabylike sentimentality, became a rousing country dance, and the sprint was on until the end of Part 1.
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  17. monitorship
  18. museumgoing
    • 2008 March 12, Alan Riding, “Liberty, Equality, Free Admission: The French Take a Cue From the British”, New York Times:
      But Mr. Sarkozy, for one, was apparently impressed during the election campaign last year when he learned of the museumgoing boom in Britain: in the six years since the permanent collections of 17 major British museums were opened without charge, the number of visitors has increased more than 60 percent to around 40 million a year.
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  19. nonart
    • 2008 March 12, Benjamin Genocchio, “Boot Camp for Curators Who Want the Top Job”, New York Times:
      To this end, the inaugural fellows were also given an intensive two-week training seminar in nonart issues relating to management, leadership, business and accounting.
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  20. noncharging
  21. noncutting
  22. nondecision
  23. nonlawmakers
  24. nonpetroleum
    • 2008 March 12, Reuters, “Trade Gap Widens a Bit; Slump Lifts Exports”, New York Times:
      The petroleum part of the trade deficit exceeded the nonpetroleum share for the first time since October 1992, reflecting both the run-up in oil prices and slackening demand for foreign-made goods like television sets, clothing, appliance and furniture.
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  25. nontonal
    • 2008 March 12, Bernard Holland, “Music in Review”, New York Times:
      So much nontonal music contradicts itself by grafting a new language onto old sentence structure, creating Brahms with wrong notes.
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  26. pepitas
  27. riblets
    • 2008 March 12, Kim Severson, “Upton Sinclair, Now Playing on YouTube”, New York Times:
      To fit in, he brought sandwiches made with soy riblets and ate them in a dusty parking lot with the other workers.
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  28. semifreddo *
    • 2008 March 12, Frank Bruni, “5. Fearing’s”, New York Times:
      The requisite chocolate dessert presents the chocolate in two guises, a rich cake and a creamy semifreddo, with two favorite accomplices: banana and peanut ($10).
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  29. semisecretly
  30. serrano *
    • 2008 March 12, “Chicken With Salsa Verde”, New York Times:
      2 serrano, jalapeño or other hot green fresh chilies, stemmed, seeded and minced, optional
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  31. stegosaurus
    • 2008 March 12, Katie Hafner, “Trying to Add a Pulse to a World of Machines”, New York Times:
      But it’s all about objects that are ugly, slow and obsolete, and while those qualities in a stegosaurus, say, might make for a fascinating dinosaur museum, they don’t do much for a computer exhibition.
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  32. superministries
    • 2008 March 12, Jim Yardley, “China Retools Its Government in Efficiency Push”, New York Times:
      BEIJING — China announced Tuesday that it would reorganize the central government by creating five so-called superministries, including one responsible for improving environmental protection.
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  33. tummo
    • 2008 March 12, Celia Mcgee, “He’s Hauling in the Visitors by Livening Up the Events”, New York Times:
      Following a 72-minute immersion in ice in front of the museum on Jan. 26 by Wim Hof, the Dutch-born practitioner of tantric tummo meditation who is known as the Iceman, the tally of people who bought tickets to the museum (and its shows on the art of the Bon, a shamanistic group living in the Himalayas and Central Asia, and the photographs of Bhutan by Kenro Izu), was 997, Mr. McHenry said, adding, “And who knows how many stopped to watch as they walked by outside?”
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  34. weavings
    • 2008 March 12, Jori Finkel, “In Santa Fe, on the Trail of New Deal Artists”, New York Times:
      The April show, she said, will consist solely of secular objects: Hopi figurines, Navajo weavings and, perhaps most prized, American Indian pottery.
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Sequestered[edit]