User:Visviva/NYT 20080323

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This is a list of lowercase non-hyphenated single words found in the 2008-03-23 issue of the New York Times which did not have English entries in the English Wiktionary when this list was created (2009-03-03).

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173357 tokens ‧ 126346 valid lowercase tokens ‧ 12798 types ‧ 70 (~ 0.547%) words before cleaning ‧ 

2008-03-23[edit]

  1. bloggy
    • 2008 March 23, David Kamp, “Permalinks”, New York Times:
      It is, dare I say it, too preoccupied with being respectably booky rather than wildly bloggy.
      add
  2. carlike
    • 2008 March 23, Phil Patton, “Thinking Outside the Cube”, New York Times:
      “The Cube is the least carlike of cars,” Mr. Nakamura said.
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  3. carrozzeria *
  4. counterpuncher
  5. crimebusters
    • 2008 March 23, Ron Powers, “Penny Dreadfuls”, New York Times:
      Even their dominant motifs shifted with the prevailing winds: from the primitive noirish panels of the ’30s to the superheroes-as-anti-Axis superpatriots of the war years, to the violent crimebusters of the late ’40s, to the weepy romance heroines who replaced the out-of-favor tough guys, to horror and science-fiction monsters as America’s postwar paranoia deepened, and then on to Mad and its imitators as a hipster subculture began to bubble up from the depths of the repressed ’50s.
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  6. detainer
    • 2008 March 23, Kareem Fahim, “Immigration Referrals by Police Draw Scrutiny”, New York Times:
      Scott Weber, the field office director for the enforcement office in Newark, said that in roughly a third of the cases, his agency would file a detainer or immigration charges; another third involved individuals who could be deported after their court cases; and the rest might be United States citizens or legal residents.
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  7. detainers
    • 2008 March 23, Kareem Fahim, “Immigration Referrals by Police Draw Scrutiny”, New York Times:
      Through January, immigration authorities placed detainers on an additional 1,468 people — giving federal agents the right to hold suspects who are released from jail.
      add
  8. duplicities
    • 2008 March 23, Alison Mcculloch, “Fiction Chronicle”, New York Times:
      As the duplicities mount (among both species), Prince’s Labrador dogma proves inadequate to the task: “Whereas dogs can learn to suppress their instincts,” he realizes, “for humans there is no hope.”
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  9. dysphemized
    • 2008 March 23, William Safire, “Mulligan Primary”, New York Times:
      Or will the Democratic convention treat the breathlessly watching nation to a credentials fight — dysphemized as a train wreck?
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  10. eponymy
    • 2008 March 23, William Safire, “Mulligan Primary”, New York Times:
      Mulligan thus achieved fame in eponymy in the company of the hated Captain Boycott, the beloved earl of Sandwich and the daring Amelia Bloomer.
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  11. footwells
    • 2008 March 23, Christopher Jensen, “Evolved and Going Nowhere”, New York Times:
      In addition, it appears that when the design team did the footwells they took “footwell” literally.
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  12. groceryman
    • 2008 March 23, Simon Romero, “In Babel of Tongues, Suriname Seeks Itself”, New York Times:
      “It is a form of communication perfect not just for poets but for the Chinese groceryman or Brazilian miner who arrived a few months ago,” he continued.
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  13. historicizing
    • 2008 March 23, Baz Dreisinger, “B-Boys and B-Girls”, New York Times:
      His meticulous historicizing works in the case of hip-hop’s well-documented inception during the mid-’70s: poverty and urban decay in places like the Bronx produced “an environment that had become comparable to the one in ‘Lord of the Flies,’ where children stranded on an island with no adult guidance create a new, brutal social order of their own.”
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  14. hybridists
    • 2008 March 23, Nate Chinen, “A Hybridist Jamming With the World”, New York Times:
      “There’s a line of thought that is growing,” said Danilo Pérez, a Panamanian pianist and composer whose 2000 album, “Motherland,” can rightly be considered a touchstone for the current generation of jazz hybridists.
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  15. ibankers
    • 2008 March 23, Michael Barbaro, “You Say Recession, I Say ‘Reservations!’”, New York Times:
      “I am willing to risk a recession if it means tons of ibankers will be gone,” wrote one anonymous poster on Curbed.com , a Web site about real estate.
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  16. immaculoids
    • 2008 March 23, Siddhartha Deb, “The Ethics Teacher”, New York Times:
      The narrative that follows gives us some fantastic images and ideas: Themisopolis, a shining city on a hill, built by Londa, its doors open to the abused, the abandoned and the persecuted; clones called immaculoids, created from aborted fetuses by a right-wing group and sent out to stalk their parents; a reconstructed Titanic in which the newly rich sail across the Atlantic to make obvious capitalism’s victory over nature.
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  17. inevitables
  18. iocaine
    • 2008 March 23, Jennifer Finney Boylan, “The Democrats’ Endless Winter”, New York Times:
      Instead of another round of debates, how about a “battle of wits” like in “The Princess Bride,” in which one of two wine glasses is laced with deadly iocaine powder by a neutral observer (say, Jim Lehrer) and then we find out “who is right and who is dead”?
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  19. kewpie
    • 2008 March 23, Charles Isherwood, “Two Helpings of Pie From Broadway’s Fridge”, New York Times:
      Didn’t she come barging back just five years ago, counterintuitively portrayed by a certain curly-haired kewpie doll named Bernadette Peters ?
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  20. kidhood
    • 2008 March 23, Ron Powers, “Penny Dreadfuls”, New York Times:
      It suggests how deeply the comics had implanted themselves in kidhood consciousness in only their second decade as a normative pop-cultural universe; how shocking and yet irresistible we found each new and more subversive permutation; and how recklessly indifferent to adult America’s ever hardening hostility were the wild misfit artists who, even as I buckled under Superduperman’s (and Lois’s) seditious antics, were dancing into the flames of self-destruction.
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  21. mauzac
    • 2008 March 23, Howard G. Goldberg, “Opening Day”, New York Times:
      Light, zippy, produced mainly from mauzac grapes, it is made more interesting by the blended-in chardonnay and chenin blanc.
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  22. microsurgical
  23. microvans
    • 2008 March 23, Phil Patton, “Thinking Outside the Cube”, New York Times:
      TO help spread the word about the Cube, the shoebox-on-wheels it will bring to American showrooms next year, Nissan offered two of the microvans to the Pratt Institute for cosmetic makeovers.
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  24. midpack
    • 2008 March 23, The Associated Press, “A.P. Indy Colt Prevails”, New York Times:
      Jockey Edgar Prado put Adriano in contention going into the far turn, after running in midpack, then held off challengers down the lane and drew clear, finishing two and a half lengths ahead of Halo Najib on the synthetic surface.
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  25. millennarian
    • 2008 March 23, Michael Kazin, “Clash of the Zealots”, New York Times:
      How does one capture the meaning of a half-century in which Americans elected first Andrew Jackson and, later, Abraham Lincoln president; fought the Mexican War and the Civil War; flocked to millennarian creeds; joined or clashed with movements for the rights of black people and women and workers of all races; endured the shift from a decentralized agrarian society to a united, industrial powerhouse; and lived in a country that more than doubled in territory and quadrupled in population?
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  26. moviedom
    • 2008 March 23, Brooks Barnes, “Oil and Hollywood Don’t Always Mix”, New York Times:
      Without being able to guarantee sizable returns — it’s anybody’s guess at the outset whether a film will make money — moviedom typically relies on selling investors a lifestyle.
      add
  27. multichallenger
    • 2008 March 23, Christopher Clarey, “The Cup Runs Aground in Court, Not on the Water”, New York Times:
      Initially, BMW Oracle officials said they sued only in the interest of forcing Alinghi to renegotiate the protocol and be part of a conventional, multichallenger America’s Cup in Valencia in 2009.
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  28. multiculti
    • 2008 March 23, Peggy Orenstein, “Mixed Messenger”, New York Times:
      Regardless, watching Senator Obama campaigning with his black wife, his Indonesian-Caucasian half-sister, his Chinese-Canadian brother-in-law and all of their multiculti kids, it seems clear that the binary, black-and-white — not to mention black-or-white — days are already behind us.
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  29. multipost
    • 2008 March 23, David Kamp, “Permalinks”, New York Times:
      News reports of the infamously lovelorn NASA astronaut Lisa Nowak inspired Zimmer to write a lengthy, multipost exegesis of singular-versus-plural approaches to the word “diaper,” as in “wearing a diaper” versus “wearing diapers.”
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  30. multiracialism
    • 2008 March 23, Peggy Orenstein, “Mixed Messenger”, New York Times:
      But the rise of multiracialism is not all Kumbaya choruses and “postracial” identity.
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  31. multiracials
    • 2008 March 23, Peggy Orenstein, “Mixed Messenger”, New York Times:
      Hawaii, Obama’s childhood home, is the most diverse state in the Union: 21 percent of residents identified as “Hapa,” a Hawaiian word meaning “half” that has gone from being a slur against mixed-race Asians to a point of pride — and has increasingly been adopted by multiracials of all kinds on the Mainland.
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  32. musicalizing
    • 2008 March 23, “Off Broadway Musicals: Tackling Difficult Themes”, New York Times:
      And Frank Loesser might have thought twice about musicalizing Damon Runyon’s “Guys and Dolls” if he had waited to do so until 1980, the year that pathological gambling made its debut in the manual’s lexicon.
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  33. myopics
    • 2008 March 23, Polly Morrice, “Descended From Salinger”, New York Times:
      The offbeat little girls of “Playdate,” whose mothers stumble through parenthood, are not the first characters to feel like cultural descendants of Salinger’s children, those savants, myopics, guileless nose pickers and practicing belchers who seem to glow on the page, highlighting the shallowness of the adults.
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  34. oxlike
    • 2008 March 23, Virginia Heffernan, “God’s Workout”, New York Times:
      They saunter or strut, depending on whether they’re showcasing their magnificent agility or their oxlike strength.
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  35. pansotti
    • 2008 March 23, “A Big Week at Brooklyn Restaurants”, New York Times:
      The entree selections will include pansotti with chestnut and ricotta filling, and chicken breast with sausage filling.
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  36. perciatelli
    • 2008 March 23, “A Big Week at Brooklyn Restaurants”, New York Times:
      As for entrees, the choices will be perciatelli with broccoli rabe pesto and pine nuts, and meatballs in toasted garlic tomato sauce.
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  37. postminimalism
    • 2008 March 23, Arthur Lubow, “After Frida”, New York Times:
      Geometric abstraction, minimalism, postminimalism, Conceptualism — art movements that Americans thought unfolded solely in North America and Europe are now recognized also to have proceeded (in some cases, preceded) in Latin America.
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  38. protominimalist
    • 2008 March 23, Arthur Lubow, “After Frida”, New York Times:
      Instead of those landmarks, Mari Carmen Ramírez, the museum’s curator of Latin American art, beamed a spotlight on the less-familiar alleyways of the South American avant-garde, especially the artists working in Brazil, Argentina and Venezuela during the quarter-centuries on either side of the end of the Second World War. Visitors to the museum gazed on striated panels that seemed to move when a spectator moved, made by the “kinetic” artists Jesús Rafael Soto and Carlos Cruz-Díez in Venezuela; the sinuously calligraphic drawings and vehemently left-wing sculptures of the Argentine Léon Ferrari; the mysterious steel-wire hangings, like sun-warped or moth-eaten Bauhaus grids, by Gertrude Goldschmidt, a wartime German refugee to Venezuela who was known professionally as Gego; and the many-faceted work of the Rio de Janeiro artists Hélio Oiticica and Lygia Clark, close colleagues whose protominimalist and precociously interactive work in the ’60s (like his capes to be danced in and her hinged sculptures to be reconfigured at will) exert a powerful influence today.
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  39. recountings
    • 2008 March 23, David Kamp, “Permalinks”, New York Times:
      Leafing through much of this book’s disparate and painstakingly assembled material — light verse, earnest essays, everyday musings, recountings of personal travail, the odd bits of drawing and photography — I was reminded less of the blogosphere than of a dreary high-school literary magazine.
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  40. sectoring
    • 2008 March 23, Thomas Goetz, “Practicing Patients”, New York Times:
      He clicked again, and up popped a bold bar graph, sectoring those 200 across a spectrum of dosages.
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  41. servanthood
  42. showgoers
    • 2008 March 23, Lawrence Ulrich, “A Show in Search of a Silver Lining”, New York Times:
      After two days of press previews last week, showgoers in New York are kicking tires at a show that includes several just-unveiled 2009 models and brings together many others from previous spectacles in Frankfurt, Los Angeles, Detroit, Chicago and Geneva.
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  43. slanguist
    • 2008 March 23, William Safire, “Mulligan Primary”, New York Times:
      By 1873, the pioneering slanguist John Hotten was delicately defining done over as “seduced.”
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  44. supercop
    • 2008 March 23, Melena Ryzik, “Regular Bloke Takes a Dip in Star Territory”, New York Times:
      That Mr. Pegg was in good shape — he was coming off his role as the stickler supercop in “Hot Fuzz,” for which he lost nearly 30 pounds — gave both director and star some pause, but in the end there was neither the time nor the desire (on Mr. Pegg’s part) to get fat, or change the title.
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  45. superpatriots
    • 2008 March 23, Ron Powers, “Penny Dreadfuls”, New York Times:
      Even their dominant motifs shifted with the prevailing winds: from the primitive noirish panels of the ’30s to the superheroes-as-anti-Axis superpatriots of the war years, to the violent crimebusters of the late ’40s, to the weepy romance heroines who replaced the out-of-favor tough guys, to horror and science-fiction monsters as America’s postwar paranoia deepened, and then on to Mad and its imitators as a hipster subculture began to bubble up from the depths of the repressed ’50s.
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  46. supersloth
  47. uncalculating
    • 2008 March 23, Michael Kimmelman, “The Patroness”, New York Times:
      In any case, her stance (and who can say just how uncalculating it is?) has reinforced her status as a highbrow designer and a fashionable patron, playing to fashion’s endemic insecurity and to the art world’s eternal yearning for fashionability.
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  48. underhyped
    • 2008 March 23, Pete Thamel, “West Virginia Sends Duke Home Early”, New York Times:
      So after embarrassing the Blue Devils on the court by scoring 22 points in a 73-67 victory, Alexander and his underrecruited and underhyped teammates spent much of the postgame interviews in the locker room mocking the Duke mystique.
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  49. unpatrolled
    • 2008 March 23, Laurie Goodstein, “Obama’s Talk Fuels Easter Sermons”, New York Times:
      The controversy drove the nation to the unpatrolled intersection of race and religion, and as many pastors prepared for their Easter message they said they felt compelled to talk about it.
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  50. unpretentiously
  51. wackadoodle
    • 2008 March 23, Maureen Dowd, “Haunting Obama’s Dreams”, New York Times:
      Hillary got a boost from the wackadoodle Jeremiah Wright.
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  52. warungs
  53. whalelike
    • 2008 March 23, Alex Mindlin, “300,000 Gallons of ‘Jaws’”, New York Times:
      Early last year, the city chose a winning design: an airy, whalelike shell, spangled with thousands of pinpoint lights, that seemed to engulf the aquarium.
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  54. wonkery
    • 2008 March 23, David Kamp, “Permalinks”, New York Times:
      As for the Becker-Posner joint-blog partnership, the sample on offer in “Ultimate Blogs” manages to take a controversial subject — the relative merits of sex selection, in which parents choose to abort a fetus if it’s not of the gender they desire — and bog it down in soporific wonkery.
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Sequestered[edit]

  1. candleabra
    • 2008 March 23, Maura Egan, “Affairs of the Art World”, New York Times:
      The décor was always basic: long banquet tables, candleabra, stemless wineglasses, old hotel cutlery picked up at flea markets.
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  2. doo *
    • 2008 March 23, Mickey Rapkin, “Perfect Tone, in a Key That’s Mostly Minor”, New York Times:
      He sang a few songs, including Gladys Knight and the Pips’ “Midnight Train to Georgia,” which Mr. Coulton performed without any musical accompaniment, save for a handful of fellow Yale graduates harmonizing behind him on a refrain of “doo bee doo bee doo.”
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  3. finnan
    • 2008 March 23, Maura Egan, “Affairs of the Art World”, New York Times:
      NOTE: Undyed, naturally smoked haddock (finnan haddie) can be ordered from www.stoningtonseafood.com
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  4. haddie
    • 2008 March 23, Maura Egan, “Affairs of the Art World”, New York Times:
      NOTE: Undyed, naturally smoked haddock (finnan haddie) can be ordered from www.stoningtonseafood.com
      add
  5. slangsleuth
    • 2008 March 23, William Safire, “Mulligan Primary”, New York Times:
      A nice tale, but with “no contemporary attestation”; the serious slangsleuth Paul Dickson reports the earliest print citation to be an A.P. dispatch of May 5, 1936, crediting the use of mulligan to Marvin McIntyre, an aide to F.D.R., which the reporter defined as “links-ology for the second shot employed after the previously dubbed shot.”
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  6. superheros = superheroes