User:Visviva/NYT 20080406

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This is a list of lowercase non-hyphenated single words found in the 2008-04-06 issue of the New York Times which did not have English entries in the English Wiktionary when this list was created (2009-03-13).

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187873 tokens ‧ 137812 valid lowercase tokens ‧ 13148 types ‧ 63 (~ 0.479%) words before cleaning ‧ 

2008-04-06[edit]

  1. arborcide
    • 2008 April 6, Jake Mooney, “The Honeylocusts’ Lament”, New York Times:
      The crime he refers to is arborcide, which in New York can be punished by jail time and a fine of up to $15,000.
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  2. boychick
    • 2008 April 6, Guy Trebay, “This Is Not a Sidewalk Bag”, New York Times:
      To those on one side of the museum’s new glass-walled addition, Mr. Ratner is a deep-pocketed patron and, as the museum’s director, Arnold Lehman, said, “a nice boychick from Cleveland, Ohio.”
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  3. catastrophization
    • 2008 April 6, Kate Zernike, “Pamperers”, New York Times:
      Paul tries to lead us out of the catastrophization of childhood but too often plays right into it.
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  4. chantoozies
    • 2008 April 6, Joe Queenan, “There Will Be a Quiz”, New York Times:
      Since Troy was only a hop, a skip and a jump from Greece, do you think Penelope should have been more skeptical about her husband’s explanation for the long delay — a cabal of one-eyed, man-eating giants; a troupe composed entirely of homicidal, aquatic chantoozies; a sorceress who can turn sailors into pigs?
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  5. charcoaled
    • 2008 April 6, Rachel Cohen, “Her Drawings With André”, New York Times:
      Among those portrayed, one sees actors, novelists, graphic artists and theater producers: a small gray man both confident and timid; a woman whose nose, forehead and hair all make a single, angular form; a woman trying to live up to her beautifully charcoaled scarf.
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  6. cheapish
    • 2008 April 6, Guy Trebay, “This Is Not a Sidewalk Bag”, New York Times:
      Standing outside them were men who resembled the African immigrant vendors who haul around telltale bundles of alluring, cheapish and almost-right copies of stuff from Gucci and Louis Vuitton.
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  7. cofavorite
    • 2008 April 6, The Associated Press, “Comply or Die Wins”, New York Times:
      Comply or Die, ridden by Timmy Murphy, was the 7-1 cofavorite.
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  8. daunomycin
    • 2008 April 6, Jeremy Pearce, “Dr. Charlotte Tan, 84, Oncologist, Dies”, New York Times:
      In the 1960s, Dr. Tan evaluated another highly successful drug, daunomycin, which is used to halt or slow the growth of cells in leukemias and in neuroblastomas, the solid tumors most common in children. Dr. Richard J. O’Reilly, a pediatric oncologist and chairman of pediatrics at Sloan-Kettering, said that Dr. Tan’s “enormous discipline and stalwart support for promising drugs” was instrumental in the acceptance of daunomycin, which remains in wide use.
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  9. deathcare
    • 2008 April 6, Bruce Felton, “Life and Death at the Opening Bell”, New York Times:
      Hillenbrand is the parent company of Batesville Casket, which positions itself as “a leader in the North American deathcare industry.”
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  10. editioned
    • 2008 April 6, Guy Trebay, “This Is Not a Sidewalk Bag”, New York Times:
      “They’re editioned canvas,” Erin Malstrom, the manager of the Vuitton store-in-museum, explained as she posed for assorted cameras in the serenely lighted gallery where the handbags are enshrined.
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  11. feudalisms
    • 2008 April 6, Holly Morris, “Searching for the Dalai Lama”, New York Times:
      With Dharamsala, the Dalai Lama envisioned a new, improved Tibet, doing away with many of the feudalisms and formalities of old and successfully building a refuge for, and incubator of, Tibetan culture.
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  12. fibbery
    • 2008 April 6, Gretchen Morgenson, “A Road Not Taken by Lenders”, New York Times:
      Instead, lenders appear to be complicit in the rampant fibbery that is one of the root causes of our continuing mortgage nightmare.
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  13. fishermanese
  14. foretopman
    • 2008 April 6, Jonathan Raban, “Down and Out in America’s Last Boomtown”, New York Times:
      Short-sighted, short-winded, with the weathered face of a foretopman, Fred’s full of rueful humor at his own recklessness.
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  15. fragrancy
    • 2008 April 6, Jesse Green, “You May See a Stranger”, New York Times:
      Call it fragrancy: when unexpected, latent meanings frequently peek out and bloom.
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  16. garagey
  17. germy
  18. goldeny
    • 2008 April 6, Henry Alford, “Eau God”, New York Times:
      It seemed so pure and goldeny.
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  19. greenskeeper
    • 2008 April 6, “Frenemies”, New York Times:
      The son of a Pennsylvania greenskeeper, who grew up without indoor plumbing, Arnie was largely self-taught.
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  20. hauntings
    • 2008 April 6, Sylvia Brownrigg, “What Used to Be”, New York Times:
      The somber and compassionate Erik encounters many hauntings in his own life and the lives of his patients.
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  21. hukou
    • 2008 April 6, Howard W. French, “Single Mothers in China Forge a Difficult Path”, New York Times:
      But now, a new awareness of the issue is raising questions about the status of women in China, as well as other rights issues like the hukou, or residency permit, a central tool of population control passed down from the Maoist era that restricts movement by linking people to the towns of their birth.
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  22. hundredaire
    • 2008 April 6, “The Hunter”, New York Times:
      Yeah, I’m a hundredaire.
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  23. kebabbed
    • 2008 April 6, Jonathan Freedland, “The Out-of-Towner”, New York Times:
      In this fashion, Kinsley skewers conservatives, such that the intellectually honest among them, at least, would feel, after reading this book, well and truly kebabbed.
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  24. macaroonian
    • 2008 April 6, “Visions of Macaroons”, New York Times:
      Our daughter, a third-generation macaroonian, sent me “A Search for a Baker Who Can Take Direction” (news article, March 27), about the Century Association’s efforts to replace its memorable macaroons after the bakery that made them shut its doors last fall.
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  25. malaprops
    • 2008 April 6, Jesse Green, “You May See a Stranger”, New York Times:
      When we first met, in October, his speech was dotted with malaprops.
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  26. movielike
    • 2008 April 6, Terrence Rafferty, “Fiction Writer’s Hollywood Detour”, New York Times:
      There’s a fairly neurotic love affair between Lawrence and a former student (Sarah Jessica Parker ), who’s still a little annoyed at the C he gave her on her “Middlemarch” paper, and their up-and-down romance generates a bit of movielike suspense.
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  27. multilanguage
    • 2008 April 6, Jesse Mckinley, “San Francisco Reaches Out to Immigrants”, New York Times:
      In what may be the first such campaign of its kind, the city plans to publish multilanguage brochures and fill the airwaves with advertisements relaying assurance that San Francisco will not report them to federal immigration authorities.
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  28. municipals
  29. neroli
    • 2008 April 6, Henry Alford, “Eau God”, New York Times:
      When a grim-looking vendor had me smell a tiny vial of orange-blossom oil, or neroli, I had a spasm of near-synesthesia — I could almost see orange blossoms.
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  30. nondangerous
    • 2008 April 6, Michael Cooper, “A McCain Confessional, in Multiple Installments”, New York Times:
      “I wanted to live the life of a daring, brash, fun-loving flier, indifferent to the hazards of his profession, calm and stoic when the adrenaline flowed, fatalistic about life-and-death situations, and determined to live every nondangerous moment of his life to the fullest,” he said in Pensacola.
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  31. nonequestrians
    • 2008 April 6, Emily Biuso, “Along for the Ride or Not”, New York Times:
      Though equestrian communities are built around the notion that residents want an exclusive community where they can board their horses and count on top-notch maintenance, many communities are instead attracting an unexpected constituency: nonequestrians.
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  32. nonpatient
    • 2008 April 6, Randy Cohen, “The Cost of Cures”, New York Times:
      Her plan requires a physician to prescribe for a nonpatient, a violation of medical ethics, and to defraud an insurance company.
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  33. opilio
  34. outmanaged
  35. passings
    • 2008 April 6, Jeff Chang, “First Came Crazy, Now Comes Odd”, New York Times:
      Cee-Lo addresses their passings on “She Knows” and “A Little Better,” from the new album, and speaks of his mother’s presence as that of a lingering friendly ghost.
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  36. pluckhouse
    • 2008 April 6, Joshua Henkin, “Bad Habit”, New York Times:
      There she befriends (and eventually becomes lovers with) the longtime pluckhouse supervisor, Stanley Gensch.
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  37. prelingual
    • 2008 April 6, Josh Emmons, “Creature Feature”, New York Times:
      Like something out of Ovid reimagined by the B-movie auteur Roger Corman, K. is a reptile, bird and mammal amalgam who, contrary to the ad copy that sells him as a freakish terror to a thrill-seeking public, eats plants, dislikes violence and, in his prelingual state of purity, cannot understand why he is being persecuted.
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  38. presliced
    • 2008 April 6, “Tuna Taco? Duck Confit?”, New York Times:
      The steak is presliced, and the waiters quickly distribute the meat, spooning the juices over the slices.
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  39. redecking
    • 2008 April 6, Peter Applebome, “A Bridge’s Grim Allure for Damaged Souls”, New York Times:
      Still, a $147 million redecking project to be completed by 2009 will increase the height of the side barriers and make it much harder to jump from the bridge.
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  40. risibly
    • 2008 April 6, Terrence Rafferty, “Fiction Writer’s Hollywood Detour”, New York Times:
      There was a time when the studios, hankering for prestige, would throw money at well-known literary figures and set them to work on projects to which their actual talents were almost risibly irrelevant: F. Scott Fitzgerald , Dorothy Parker , Nathanael West , William Faulkner , Gore Vidal and Truman Capote , among others, all did their stints and went home, for the most part, baffled.
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  41. rodentlike
    • 2008 April 6, Jerry Garrett, “Old Amalfi, New Mouse”, New York Times:
      Its small size and rodentlike looks quickly earned early models a nickname they could never quite shake: “Topolino ” — the Italian name for “Mickey Mouse.”
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  42. semimomentous
    • 2008 April 6, Terrence Rafferty, “Fiction Writer’s Hollywood Detour”, New York Times:
      All of which might, eventually, bring Mr. Poirier to just the sort of small, grudging, semimomentous acknowledgment of reality that his characters always seem to come to when his nothing-happening stories are over.
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  43. skelly
    • 2008 April 6, Jeff Byles, “Taking Back the Streets”, New York Times:
      The idea of blocking off streets so children can play rousing games of skelly and the like dates to at least 1916, when worried city officials called for shutting 100 streets in congested areas during certain times of day.
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  44. southwesternmost
  45. subheadline
    • 2008 April 6, William Safire, “Moral Hazard”, New York Times:
      That phrase, used in a 1936 Times subheadline about a call by the former governor Al Smith (“He Says New York Is Too Big to Fail in Duty of Giving to Private Welfare Agencies”) surfaced again in a 1975 Business Week headline about a government loan guarantee to protect Lockheed Aircraft: “When Companies Get Too Big to Fail.”
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  46. superaffluent
    • 2008 April 6, Daniel Mcginn, “Putting a Price on Luxury”, New York Times:
      And as old-line families have given way to a new class of superaffluent buyers, homes that were once kept in the family for decades have begun selling more frequently.
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  47. superleveraged
    • 2008 April 6, Stephen Kotkin, “When the Splurge Takes Its Toll”, New York Times:
      Events have rocketed most of Mr. Morris’s suggestions from nonstarter status and into the glare of suddenly worried lobbyists: for example, having loans to superleveraged parties carry penalty capital charges, or moving now secretive trades in high-volume credit derivatives into public exchanges.
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  48. superplague
    • 2008 April 6, Joshua Henkin, “Bad Habit”, New York Times:
      She depicts the mixture of terror and sang-froid as people stay riveted to the TV, watching superplague mark its serpentine course across the map even as they go about their own business.
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  49. surrealness
    • 2008 April 6, Deirdre Mcnamer, “How Big Sky Went Dark”, New York Times:
      The candidates were undoubtedly prepped about Butte’s economic history (raucous copper-mining town in its heyday, union town, company town, Democratic stronghold), its demographics (white, blue-collar, Catholic, lots of Irish), its decline (drastic population loss, abandoned mines, Superfund site, the Power debacle), the faint sparks of economic hope (a windmill turbine plant, an influx of artists and environmental cleanup folks), its surrealness (that 90-foot statue of the Virgin Mary, looking down from a mountaintop at a denuded landscape dotted with mine mainframes and an abandoned open-pit mine the size of a small county!)
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  50. tanklike
    • 2008 April 6, James Angelos, “For a Church Bathed in History, a Last-Minute Miracle”, New York Times:
      FOR the past few weeks, a large excavator with tanklike wheels has stood a few ominous feet from St. Saviour’s, an old Gothic-style church atop a small hill in Maspeth, Queens.
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  51. taxables
    • 2008 April 6, Robert D. Hershey, “Amid the Upheaval, Opportunity in Bonds”, New York Times:
      “As long as you have people worrying about whether municipal bonds are backed or not, you’re going to have them paying, relative to taxables, what seem to be ridiculously high rates,” said Gary Silverman, a financial planner and investment manager in Wichita Falls, Tex.
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  52. taxidermied
    • 2008 April 6, “Letters: Redrawing From the Art World”, New York Times:
      But I was disappointed that the intriguing glimpses into the jobs of the art world’s “unsung heroes” (risking their lives on elevator cars! hanging a taxidermied horse from a ceiling!) were buried in the small-print descriptions of their clothes.
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  53. underemphasizing
    • 2008 April 6, J. Alex Tarquinio, “New Rules May Help Target-Date Funds”, New York Times:
      He said Vanguard does not try to time the market by overemphasizing or underemphasizing certain asset classes in its target-date offerings.
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  54. underpatronized
    • 2008 April 6, Jonathan Raban, “Down and Out in America’s Last Boomtown”, New York Times:
      Likewise, the new $52 million, 1.3-mile streetcar line, a pet project of the mayor, which runs from downtown to the giant construction site of South Lake Union, and whose shiny red, orange and purple cars are cute, quaint and eerily underpatronized.
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  55. untrustworthiness
    • 2008 April 6, Joe Queenan, “There Will Be a Quiz”, New York Times:
      Admittedly, these matters are open to debate, as raven feeders traditionally fall just below griffin trainers in the untrustworthiness hierarchy.
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  56. woonerf

Sequestered[edit]

  1. ewww *
    • 2008 April 6, Jonathan Miles, “Let Rocky Balboa Drink the Yolks”, New York Times:
      A certain ewww factor, plus fears of salmonella, put a decades-long damper on eggy drinks, but bartenders, following the lead of the classic cocktail revivalists who’ve been reaching back into the 19th century for inspiration and ingredients, now seem confident that drinkers have outgrown their squirms.
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  2. schlag
    • 2008 April 6, “Tuna Taco? Duck Confit?”, New York Times:
      All desserts are served “mit schlag” (with whipped cream), and an excellent schlag it is.
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  3. millenials = millennials
    • 2008 April 6, Phil Patton, “Small Cars Seek Appeal Beyond the Cute Factor”, New York Times:
      The so-called millenials, or Gen-Y buyers, that Ford hopes to attract with the Fiesta are accustomed to products that offer high value in small packages, said Peter Horbury, executive design director for the Americas at the Ford Motor Company.
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