User:Visviva/NYT 20080409

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This is a list of lowercase non-hyphenated single words found in the 2008-04-09 issue of the New York Times which did not have English entries in the English Wiktionary when this list was created (2009-03-13).

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99901 tokens ‧ 73396 valid lowercase tokens ‧ 9072 types ‧ 35 (~ 0.386%) words before cleaning ‧ 

2008-04-09[edit]

  1. alambics
  2. beddings
    • 2008 April 9, Yudhijit Bhattacharjee, “Harnessing Biology, and Avoiding Oil, for Chemical Goods”, New York Times:
      Similarly, the biotech giant Cargill has begun manufacturing a polymer from vegetable oils that is used in polyurethane foams, which is found in beddings, furniture and car-seat headrests.
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  3. biobased
    • 2008 April 9, Yudhijit Bhattacharjee, “Harnessing Biology, and Avoiding Oil, for Chemical Goods”, New York Times:
      To make biobased manufacturing economically appealing, researchers are also determining ways to reduce the energy costs of transforming hydrocarbon building blocks like sugars and alcohols obtained from biomass into polymers. Dr. Gross and his colleagues at Polytechnic University have been using enzymes for that goal — making, among other things, a biodegradable polyester coating.
      add
  4. bioderived
  5. biorefineries
  6. chuckleheaded
    • 2008 April 9, Maureen Dowd, “Toil and Trouble”, New York Times:
      But then, predictably for everyone except the chuckleheaded W. and Cheney, the Shiites began tormenting the Sunnis.
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  7. conguero
    • 2008 April 9, Ben Ratliff, “Changes, and a Constant, for New York Jazz Festival”, New York Times:
      In recognition of the old club’s groundbreaking Monday night Salsa Meets Jazz series, the Latin-jazz conguero and the bandleader Poncho Sanchez will perform there on Monday, June 23.
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  8. eventing *
    • 2008 April 9, Katie Thomas, “Equestrians’ Deaths Spread Unease in Sport”, New York Times:
      Considered alongside the deaths of 12 riders worldwide over the past year and a half, his crash has reignited a fierce debate over whether the risks involved with the equestrian discipline known as eventing — an arduous three-phase competition — have become too great.
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  9. flambees
  10. fogbanks
  11. guanciale *
    • 2008 April 9, “Corrections”, New York Times:
      An article on Monday about the growing number of foreigners in Italy who have excelled as professional chefs of Italian cuisine referred incorrectly to the preparation of guanciale, or pig cheek, an ingredient used in carbonara, a pasta dish.
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  12. lambruscos
    • 2008 April 9, Eric Asimov, “Wine Bars Grow Up and Squeeze In”, New York Times:
      At Cavatappo, a storefront on the Upper East Side barely bigger than a breadboard, the selections on a recent visit included a couple of earthy lambruscos, and while the nibbles are largely Italian, the wines include the superb Gaia Thalassitis, from the Greek island of Santorini.
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  13. lifeguarding
    • 2008 April 9, “Venezuelan Channel Banishes Simpsons”, New York Times:
      “Baywatch Hawaii,” with its lifeguarding bikini-wearing beauties and muscle-bound hunks, took over the time slot on Friday.
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  14. morcilla
    • 2008 April 9, Eric Asimov, “Wine Bars Grow Up and Squeeze In”, New York Times:
      My open sandwich, made with morcilla, a delectable Spanish blood sausage, layered over multicolored roasted peppers, was too good to sacrifice a bite.
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  15. noncontrolling
  16. perceptivity
    • 2008 April 9, George Vecsey, “Mets’ Nostalgia Brings Up Bad Memories”, New York Times:
      The name Shea was attached to the wall, near the left-field foul pole, as dozens of descendants of Bill Shea celebrated the perceptivity and power that forced baseball to get a New York team back in the National League after the defection of the Giants and the Dodgers.
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  17. plunkings
  18. propanediol
    • 2008 April 9, Yudhijit Bhattacharjee, “Harnessing Biology, and Avoiding Oil, for Chemical Goods”, New York Times:
      He pointed to DuPont’s synthesis of propanediol, which was pushed along by the company’s goal to use the chemical to make Sorona, a stain-resistant textile that does not lose color easily.
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  19. properness
    • 2008 April 9, Verlyn Klinkenborg, “Ving, Vang, Vong. Or, the Pleasures of a New Vocabulary.”, New York Times:
      You find yourself at sea, awash in the natural world, and yet at the same time you find yourself immured in a vigilant kind of properness, a clear sense of how things should be.
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  20. rouget
    • 2008 April 9, Elaine Louie, “One Pot”, New York Times:
      She bought fresh fish, often rouget, and sautéed a chopped onion, carrot and leek.
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  21. rouille *
    • 2008 April 9, Elaine Louie, “One Pot”, New York Times:
      Sometimes, the family made croutons topped with rouille to float on the broth.
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  22. sippable
    • 2008 April 9, Seth Kugel, “Allure of Cachaça Spreads to U.S. From Brazil”, New York Times:
      Antônio Rocha hopes those casks, when added to the 17 full ones in another cellar, will help satisfy the growing taste in the United States for wood-aged cachaça, a smoother, sippable version of the spirit his family has been making for four generations on the farm.
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  23. steeved
    • 2008 April 9, Verlyn Klinkenborg, “Ving, Vang, Vong. Or, the Pleasures of a New Vocabulary.”, New York Times:
      I am a longtime reader of sailing narratives, and when I come to the technical bits — where the bumkin is being steeved and the leach vanged under gale-force winds — I always let my mind glaze over the way I do when I come to the math in books about cosmology.
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  24. ultralong
    • 2008 April 9, David S. Joachim, “Devices That Track Every Precious Need”, New York Times:
      He says he sells 50 to 75 tracking devices a month, with prices from $400 to $700, depending on features, like ultralong battery life or waterproof casing.
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  25. unpoked
  26. unremarkableness
    • 2008 April 9, Eric Asimov, “Wine Bars Grow Up and Squeeze In”, New York Times:
      Where wine bars were once a novelty in New York, their very unremarkableness today indicates how they’ve become an accepted part of the New York landscape, local hangouts like the corner bar or the coffee spot.
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  27. vanged
    • 2008 April 9, Verlyn Klinkenborg, “Ving, Vang, Vong. Or, the Pleasures of a New Vocabulary.”, New York Times:
      I am a longtime reader of sailing narratives, and when I come to the technical bits — where the bumkin is being steeved and the leach vanged under gale-force winds — I always let my mind glaze over the way I do when I come to the math in books about cosmology.
      add
  28. vanguardist


Sequestered[edit]

  1. butterleaf
    • 2008 April 9, Mark Bittman, “Quickly and Easily, a Touch of Elegance”, New York Times:
      This will not be a problem if you use a butterleaf lettuce like Bibb, or possibly the inner leaves of romaine or cabbage (it depends on the particular head).
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  2. mousseline
    • 2008 April 9, Florence Fabricant, “There’ll Always Be a France, Especially in New York”, New York Times:
      Expect throwbacks like asparagus mousseline, escargots, pâté en croûte, roast chicken for two and cassoulet, in an evocative setting of carved wood paneling, mirrors, antique brass trim and red velour.
      add
  3. butterleaf
    • 2008 April 9, Mark Bittman, “Quickly and Easily, a Touch of Elegance”, New York Times:
      This will not be a problem if you use a butterleaf lettuce like Bibb, or possibly the inner leaves of romaine or cabbage (it depends on the particular head).
      add
  4. mousseline
    • 2008 April 9, Florence Fabricant, “There’ll Always Be a France, Especially in New York”, New York Times:
      Expect throwbacks like asparagus mousseline, escargots, pâté en croûte, roast chicken for two and cassoulet, in an evocative setting of carved wood paneling, mirrors, antique brass trim and red velour.
      add