User:Visviva/NYT 20080413

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This is a list of lowercase non-hyphenated single words found in the 2008-04-13 issue of the New York Times which did not have English entries in the English Wiktionary when this list was created (2009-03-13).

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177880 tokens ‧ 129769 valid lowercase tokens ‧ 13196 types ‧ 78 (~ 0.591%) words before cleaning ‧ 

2008-04-13[edit]

  1. amoebalike
    • 2009 2009-03-13, “My Life in Pictures”, New York Times, page 42:
      My parents competed over who could outfit me in better fashions. 1934: My student card from the University of Paris, where I studied art history. 1980: I wrote my name in the back of my town house in Chelsea, where I’ve run a Sunday salon for more than 30 years. 2007: Still working, at 96, and exhibiting around the world. 1996: Posing in front of one of my spider sculptures in Brooklyn. 1975: In an amoebalike latex suit that I designed and made.
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  2. bijoux *
    • 2009 2009-03-13, Maura Egan, “Loupe Dreams”, New York Times, page 52:
      The most important art moment of the 20th century is Duchamp drawing the mustache on the Mona Lisa,” Tom Binns announces as he dips his hands into a box of bijoux.
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  3. boobirds
  4. brainlike
    • 2008 April 13, Peter Applebome, “Matzo Sells Like Hotcakes”, New York Times:
      In the universe of Passover-themed products, gefilte fish, the alarmingly brainlike glob that evokes nothing even vaguely piscine but is made from boned carp, pike and whitefish, remains the Edsel of the kosher product line.
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  5. bronzy
    • 2008 April 13, “What Do You See?”, New York Times:
      Kuskin’s mixed-media illustrations fill each scene with subdued earthy greens and browns, cool blues and an unusual bronzy sun.
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  6. chaabi *
    • 2008 April 13, Ben Ratliff, “From Algiers to New York, New Riffs on the Tried and True”, New York Times:
      The music is chaabi, a long-lost alloy of North African, Andalusian and Middle Eastern sources; its high period was in the bars of Algiers after World War II. The orchestra has banjos, lutes, mandolins and violins, playing unison lines; it’s led by a pianist, and it moves along on a bed of percussion, thundering and then turning romantic and vulnerable.
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  7. chavski
    • 2009 2009-03-13, Horacio Silva, “Glamour and Sickle”, New York Times, page 24:
      If, in the recent past, tacky fashion has been the sole province of the chav — the disaffected English working-class yoof with a taste for binge drinking and Burberry — then we could well be entering the golden age of the chavski.
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  8. declinist
    • 2008 April 13, Sam Tanenhaus, “Requiem for Two Heavyweights”, New York Times:
      The disappearance of the public intellectual has become a familiar, not to say wearisome, refrain in our declinist moment.
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  9. detainer
    • 2008 April 13, Christine Hauser, “U.S. Officials Are Expected to Charge Police Officer”, New York Times:
      Officer Torres’s lawyer, Paul S. Missan, said on Saturday that he had been told by a prison official in Pennsylvania that a detainer was lodged against his client, meaning he was likely to face federal charges.
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  10. diplolingo
    • 2008 April 13, William Safire, “Revanche Is Sweet”, New York Times:
      Another McCain linguistic thrust: in diplolingo, realist was a word adopted a few years ago by foreign-policy wonks tired of being called accommodationist by Kissingerian exponents of tough-minded realpolitik.
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  11. dishwatery
    • 2009 2009-03-13, S.S. Fair, “Take Tea and See”, New York Times, page 22:
      Measure precisely; fresh tea makes mass-market bags taste dishwatery.
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  12. distancings
    • 2008 April 13, Dave Itzkoff, “Bob Dylan Finally Gets His Pulitzer. His What?”, New York Times:
      If you were apprehensive, you were in the good company of Dylan aficionados still grappling with the trickster mystique of the 66-year-old singer-songwriter who see the Pulitzer as another chapter in his complicated history with the establishment, an ongoing dance of distancings and détentes.
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  13. eventing *
  14. feare
    • 2008 April 13, Maura J. Casey, “Of Witches and the Wait for Justice”, New York Times:
      Based on evidence — drinking wine and dancing around a bonfire — the court pronounced her guilty “for not having the feare of God before thyne eyes.”
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  15. forechecker
    • 2008 April 13, Jeff Z. Klein And Lew Serviss, “Leetch Weighs Changes to Defenseman’s Game”, New York Times:
      Under the anti-obstruction rules, backchecking forwards can no longer slow down a forechecker after the puck is fired into the zone.
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  16. glitteratski
    • 2009 2009-03-13, Horacio Silva, “Glamour and Sickle”, New York Times, page 24:
      But while the cashed-up glitteratski have been welcomed with open arms by the city’s luxury retailers and exorbitantly priced clubs like Movida and Tramp, the one spot they have had trouble getting into is the hermetically sealed world of fashion.
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  17. hiccupy
    • 2008 April 13, Jesse Green, “Broadway’s Cookie, Un-Sugarcoated”, New York Times:
      Gone was the hiccupy, adenoidal voice of Miss Adelaide, her breakthrough role in the 1992 “Guys and Dolls” revival.
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  18. hippiefied
    • 2008 April 13, Greg Evans, “A Hip Shaker in His Prime, Among Hip Friends”, New York Times:
      By comparison a hippiefied Bobby Darin , tame Diahann Carroll and pre-”Cabaret” Liza Minnelli , all on the “Legendary Performers” set, come up short.
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  19. honeylike
    • 2008 April 13, Howard G. Goldberg, “5th Question: What to Pour?”, New York Times:
      Moments later, a honeylike and melonlike aroma and flavor leave an impression of sweetness.
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  20. kneipping
    • 2009 2009-03-13, Janine Di Giovanni, “The Road to Wellville”, New York Times, page 46:
      The hot-and-cold-water treatment Sweetie referred to is called kneipping: you put your feet or your wrists or your shins in water to force your circulation to speed up.
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  21. melonlike
    • 2008 April 13, Howard G. Goldberg, “5th Question: What to Pour?”, New York Times:
      Moments later, a honeylike and melonlike aroma and flavor leave an impression of sweetness.
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  22. minbar
  23. minibreak
    • 2008 April 13, Viv Bernstein, “New Life for France as Bryans Fall in Doubles”, New York Times:
      Still, in a tight opening set with no breaks of serve and few opportunities, the Bryans overcame an early minibreak in the tie breaker and won it, 9-7.
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  24. miniconcerts
    • 2008 April 13, Greg Evans, “A Hip Shaker in His Prime, Among Hip Friends”, New York Times:
      In the solo miniconcerts that end each episode, Mr. Jones, whose popularity among the casino crowd holds strong today, occasionally reduces his mostly female, mostly old-enough-to-know-better audiences to near Beatles-at-Shea hysterics.
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  25. miniwagon
    • 2008 April 13, Lawrence Ulrich, “Half a Loaf, for a Mini Appetite”, New York Times:
      The latest variation of the Mini Cooper is the Clubman miniwagon, which evokes the Mini Traveller and Countryman of the 1960s.
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  26. multishade
    • 2009 2009-03-13, Alex Kuczynski, “Extreme Makeover”, New York Times, page 88:
      For blush, Neutrogena’s multishade Healthy Skin Blends in Vibrant.
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  27. nonepileptic
    • 2008 April 13, Mary Roach, “Damage Control”, New York Times:
      He paraphrases William James’s remark that to view these visions as symptoms is “obscenely reductive” and suggests that epilepsy provides a path to spiritual insights inaccessible to the nonepileptic.
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  28. nonowners
    • 2008 April 13, James Schembari, “Is It Fixed? How to Check”, New York Times:
      Ford said that a dealer or the company’s Customer Relationship Center at (800) 392-3673 will also provide nonowners with detailed recall information.
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  29. ofuro
    • 2009 2009-03-13, “Clean Breaks”, New York Times, page 61:
      This toxin-free environment (untreated bamboo, “chemical-free” paints) features traditional Japanese ofuro baths.
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  30. panelized
  31. pheromonic
    • 2008 April 13, “Sexual Chemistry”, New York Times:
      Perhaps this molecular banner was meant to represent the pheromonic chemical science behind sex research.
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  32. polingo
    • 2008 April 13, William Safire, “Revanche Is Sweet”, New York Times:
      Two books are on the way that reveal the tugging and hauling in the world of polingo: Ted Sorensen’s “Counselor,” the honest revelations of J.F.K.’s closest aide (HarperCollins, $28), and “White House Ghosts,” by Robert Schlesinger (Simon & Schuster, $30), who illuminates our rising passion for notoriety.
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  33. postdebate
    • 2008 April 13, Mark Leibovich, “The Aria of Chris Matthews”, New York Times:
      But this didn’t keep Matthews from bludgeoning the marlin line to death in the postdebate “spin room.”
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  34. prostheticists
    • 2008 April 13, Gary Marcus, “Total Recall”, New York Times:
      However difficult the practicalities, there’s no reason in principle why a future generation of neural prostheticists couldn’t pick up where nature left off, incorporating Google-like master maps into neural implants.
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  35. ragers
    • 2008 April 13, Virginia Heffernan, “The Guest-Host Industrial Complex”, New York Times:
      From the looks of the site’s featured cards, most of those parties were ragers for the Hooters crowd, with ads — I mean “invitation designs ” — that emphasize consumption over conviviality.
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  36. razored
    • 2008 April 13, Sara Corbett, “Can the Cellphone Help End Global Poverty?”, New York Times:
      He might be busy examining the advertisements for prostitutes stuck up in a São Paulo phone booth, or maybe getting his ear hairs razored off at a barber shop in Vietnam.
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  37. rematerialized
  38. reshampooed
    • 2008 April 13, Jesse Green, “Broadway’s Cookie, Un-Sugarcoated”, New York Times:
      “Most people know me as a comedic actress, and that’s a part of me,” she said while being reshampooed.
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  39. rollerboard
    • 2008 April 13, “Letters: Carrying Your Stuff”, New York Times:
      To maximize my chances of finding overhead bin space, I have a 21-inch-long rollerboard.
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  40. rollerboards
    • 2008 April 13, “Letters: Carrying Your Stuff”, New York Times:
      Unlike the more common 24-inch rollerboards, this fits lengthwise in bins of all jets with 3-3 seating or two aisles.
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  41. roundedness
    • 2008 April 13, Andrew O’Hagan, “N + 2”, New York Times:
      He has lots of girl trouble, too, and he hungers for status and sits around at Harvard worrying about “the roundedness of his character.”
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  42. sencha
    • 2009 2009-03-13, S.S. Fair, “Take Tea and See”, New York Times, page 22:
      And as a 20-something tea-ist opined over a pot of sencha: “When you want to meet friends, coffee is so clichéd and bar booze is so expensive.
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  43. skeeved
    • 2009 2009-03-13, Holly Brubach, “America’s Next Top Author”, New York Times, page 50:
      Though both are virgins, Violet develops a crush on a dapper, eerily suave student at N.Y.U. who moonlights as a club promoter and appears regularly on Page Six. Whereas Cheryl, devoted to her work, is skeeved by the sleazeballs twice her age who hit on her in clubs and on the street.
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  44. slablike
    • 2008 April 13, Alastair Macaulay, “The Heart Leaps Whenever They Do”, New York Times:
      With her stunning, slablike cheekbones, her wide grin and her mane of dark curls, she was effortlessly sensual in even the simplest movements.
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  45. stayovers
    • 2008 April 13, Michelle Higgins, “Early-Bird Discounts for Business Class”, New York Times:
      To make sure they don’t cannibalize their lucrative business clients, these fares come with certain requirements like Saturday-night stayovers.
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  46. subclavian
    • 2008 April 13, Sarah Manguso, “The Cure”, New York Times:
      Then I had three catheters in my subclavian vein.
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  47. techworld
    • 2008 April 13, Virginia Heffernan, “The Guest-Host Industrial Complex”, New York Times:
      Last year, Time magazine included Evite among the five worst sites on the Web, and the techworld gossip site Valleywag ranked Evite its most-hated company.
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  48. tecks
    • 2008 April 13, Christopher Gray, “A Family’s Legacy, Burnished Anew”, New York Times:
      In 1902, the company advertised its neckwear in The Brooklyn Daily Eagle, offering “7,200 high grade squares, imperials, four-in-hands, tecks, puffs, etc.” in “seasonable coloring” for 50 cents each.
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  49. thyne
    • 2008 April 13, Maura J. Casey, “Of Witches and the Wait for Justice”, New York Times:
      Based on evidence — drinking wine and dancing around a bonfire — the court pronounced her guilty “for not having the feare of God before thyne eyes.”
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  50. triology
    • 2008 April 13, Julie Just, “Bookshelf”, New York Times:
      This trim novella may lack the grandeur of Pullmans Dark Materials triology, to which this is a prequel, but it gives a new tough-guy adventure to one of its unforgettable characters, the pistol-packing ballonist Lee Scoresby.
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  51. ultratight
    • 2009 2009-03-13, Horacio Silva, “Glamour and Sickle”, New York Times, page 24:
      High-street stores like Top Shop and Primark — the fashion-on-a-budget powerhouse disparagingly known as Primarni — are brimming with brightly colored leggings and jeans, ultratight minis, white high-heeled shoes and more rhinestones than a D&G outlet store in Vladivostok.
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  52. unchic
    • 2008 April 13, Stephen Koch, “The Playboy Was a Spy”, New York Times:
      By 1936, Coward’s unchic loathing of appeasement and Neville Chamberlain (“that bloody conceited old sod”) was turning him into something of a Churchill bore.
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  53. uncontentious
    • 2008 April 13, Sam Roberts, “Barry Gottehrer, 73, Lindsay Aide, Dies”, New York Times:
      Straight black hair combed back, deep, sad, dark eyes, a strong nose angled down, the whole contour of his face projects such uncontentious melancholy that many of his battles — and potentially Mayor Lindsay’s — are de-escalated with a wan smile and a handshake.”
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  54. ungettable
    • 2008 April 13, Margy Rochlin, “What She Really Wants to Do Is ...”, New York Times:
      In this game you often get into a horrible dance where they say, “If you get me these three totally ungettable actors, we’ll give you this much money.”
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  55. unignorable
    • 2008 April 13, Virginia Heffernan, “The Guest-Host Industrial Complex”, New York Times:
      But now I spot them with less than a glance, and they produce a faint but unignorable tension in me as long as they go unanswered: I want to be grateful for an invitation, but I feel harassed.
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  56. unintimidating
    • 2008 April 13, Sara Corbett, “Can the Cellphone Help End Global Poverty?”, New York Times:
      This sort of on-the-ground intelligence-gathering is central to what’s known as human-centered design, a business-world niche that has become especially important to ultracompetitive high-tech companies trying to figure out how to write software, design laptops or build cellphones that people find useful and unintimidating and will thus spend money on.
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  57. unnoticeably
    • 2008 April 13, Anne Eisenberg, “Instant Digital Prints (and Polaroid Nostalgia)”, New York Times:
      The new printers are so lightweight that a Polaroid executive demonstrating them recently had three tucked unnoticeably into various pockets of his trim jacket, whipping them out as if he were Harpo Marx.
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  58. unpronounceables
    • 2009 2009-03-13, “Natural Selection”, New York Times, page 61:
      Synthetic fragrances can contain a laundry list of chemicals — hormone disrupters, petroleum-derived unpronounceables, asthma triggers and on and on.
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  59. worldless
    • 2008 April 13, Matt Zoller Seitz, “Jazz on Screen: The Sparks Are Eclectic”, New York Times:
      The film’s music-driven opening — an extended, worldless montage of Johannesburg life — is a symphony of a city that makes life itself seem musical.
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Sequestered[edit]

  1. charley *
    • 2008 April 13, Lisa Sanders, M.D., “Poison Pill”, New York Times:
      She began to describe the terrible charley horses that Ong knew were a common and distressing problem among the elderly.
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  2. yerba
    • 2009 2009-03-13, S.S. Fair, “Take Tea and See”, New York Times, page 22:
      Noncaffeinated herbal infusions like chamomile, yerba mate and the lip-smacking rooibos (red bush) do wonders for mind-body synergies, but they’re tisanes, not teas.
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  3. ballonist: only used in English by Philip Pullman
    • 2008 April 13, Julie Just, “Bookshelf”, New York Times:
      This trim novella may lack the grandeur of Pullmans Dark Materials triology, to which this is a prequel, but it gives a new tough-guy adventure to one of its unforgettable characters, the pistol-packing ballonist Lee Scoresby.
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  4. candelighted ?! = candlelit
    • 2008 April 13, Kayleen Schaefer, “What’s Going On?”, New York Times:
      Downstairs, a bistro serves five kinds of moules frites; upstairs, a candelighted lounge decorated with photographs of Martha and the Vandellas and Josephine Baker offers three kinds of Chimay along with Leffe Brune and Coresendonk Abbey Ale on tap.
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