User:Visviva/NYT 20080415

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to: navigation, search
← Previous (2008-04-14) Words harvested from the New York Times, 2008-04-15
  • List status: open
→ Next (2008-04-16)

This is a list of lowercase non-hyphenated single words found in the 2008-04-15 issue of the New York Times which did not have English entries in the English Wiktionary when this list was created (2009-03-13).

[ see all NYT pages ] - [ see all tracking lists ]

90820 tokens ‧ 67467 valid lowercase tokens ‧ 8888 types ‧ 22 (~ 0.248%) words before cleaning ‧ 

2008-04-15[edit]

  1. biosources
    • 2008 April 15, Natalie Angier, “Adored, Deplored and Ubiquitous”, New York Times:
      The reason petroleum so often serves as the foundation for plastics production is that it offers an ultraconcentrated source of carbon, but carbon is carbon and with the right manipulations other handier biosources like lawn litter will do.
      add
  2. corpselike
    • 2008 April 15, Dave Kehr, “New DVDs: ‘Blast of Silence’ and ‘Inside’”, New York Times:
      But Paris is burning (the film is set during the suburban riots of 2005); most of the primary colors have been drained from the image (leaving a world tinged with a corpselike, greenish-yellow pallor); and a mysterious woman dressed in black (accessorized by some sort of bondage corset) is pounding at the door.
      add
  3. indecorousness
    • 2008 April 15, Allan Kozinn, “Using Sharp, Vehement Gestures to Produce Expansive Sounds”, New York Times:
      But maybe this indecorousness should be standard technique, because the music making was extraordinary. Mr. Vanska began with a Sibelius rarity, “The Dryad” (Op. 45, No. 1), drawing a taut, thoroughly unified performance driven by the dark, wintry string tone so crucial to Sibelius’s music.
      add
  4. linkable
    • 2008 April 15, Natalie Angier, “Adored, Deplored and Ubiquitous”, New York Times:
      The polymers in both cases tend to feature a lot of carbon atoms, carbon having a readily linkable structure that makes it an ideal component of life — of the lives we live now, and of the ancient, squeezed and subliminated lives that constitute fossil fuels.
      add
  5. lungless
    • 2008 April 15, Henry Fountain, “Frogs in Borneo Added to Ranks of the Lungless”, New York Times:
      It’s the first completely lungless frog, the researchers report in Current Biology, joining some salamanders and one species of caecilian, a snakelike type of amphibian, in the lungless category.
      add
  6. lunglessness
    • 2008 April 15, Henry Fountain, “Frogs in Borneo Added to Ranks of the Lungless”, New York Times:
      No one is certain why lunglessness has evolved, but a popular theory suggests it does so in response to an extreme environment — cold, swift-flowing streams.
      add
  7. midtrack
    • 2008 April 15, Roslyn Sulcas, “Gravity, Drollery and Even Economy”, New York Times:
      Like Mr. Crossman, Brandon A. Collwes, a Cunningham company member, showed strong influences of the master and also used film in his “Intentional Happenstance in Parts,” a trio whose dancers sported mirror-encrusted bathing caps and occasionally changed the unidentified music in midtrack.
      add
  8. nonelective
  9. nonpilot
    • 2008 April 15, Jeff Bailey, “Delta and Northwest in $3 Billion Deal”, New York Times:
      Another 4 percent stake in the combined company is to be handed out to domestic nonpilot workers at both companies.
      add
  10. occipitotemporal
    • 2008 April 15, Eric Nagourney, “Patterns: Dyslexia as Different as Day and Night”, New York Times:
      When the researchers used functional M.R.I. machines to look at the workings of the brain in Chinese- and English-speaking dyslexics, they found that in the English speakers there was weak reading activity in the temporoparietal and occipitotemporal regions.
      add
  11. promarket
    • 2008 April 15, Landon Thomas Jr., “Wall Streeter Converts to a Fan of Regulation”, New York Times:
      Such a suspicion is in many ways rooted in Mr. Steel’s own promarket sympathies, which were on display when he was co-chairman of the United States Chamber of Commerce’s inquiry into the country’s regulatory structure.
      add
  12. stretchiness
    • 2008 April 15, Natalie Angier, “Adored, Deplored and Ubiquitous”, New York Times:
      It’s also an ideal constituent for monomers you want to toss together into your pot and have a product with useful properties come out the other side, like stretchiness, stickiness, ductility, disdain for electrical flow.
      add
  13. stuntfest
  14. subliminated
    • 2008 April 15, Natalie Angier, “Adored, Deplored and Ubiquitous”, New York Times:
      The polymers in both cases tend to feature a lot of carbon atoms, carbon having a readily linkable structure that makes it an ideal component of life — of the lives we live now, and of the ancient, squeezed and subliminated lives that constitute fossil fuels.
      add
  15. subscapularis
  16. superregulator
    • 2008 April 15, Landon Thomas Jr., “Wall Streeter Converts to a Fan of Regulation”, New York Times:
      Robert K. Steel leans forward, speaking in a rapid, excitable burst about the powers that a superregulator might wield over Wall Street one day.
      add
  17. temporoparietal
    • 2008 April 15, Eric Nagourney, “Patterns: Dyslexia as Different as Day and Night”, New York Times:
      When the researchers used functional M.R.I. machines to look at the workings of the brain in Chinese- and English-speaking dyslexics, they found that in the English speakers there was weak reading activity in the temporoparietal and occipitotemporal regions.
      add

Sequestered[edit]