User:Visviva/NYT 20080420

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This is a list of lowercase non-hyphenated single words found in the 2008-04-20 issue of the New York Times which did not have English entries in the English Wiktionary when this list was created (2009-03-13).

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172846 tokens ‧ 126808 valid lowercase tokens ‧ 12852 types ‧ 54 (~ 0.42%) words before cleaning ‧ 

2008-04-20[edit]

  1. benefitless
    • 2008 April 20, Torie Osborn, “The Joy of Marriage Was Ours, for a While”, New York Times:
      In California, my partner and I signed a benefitless domestic partnership registry in 2001, and then, a scant two years later, we were granted a whole lot of separate-but-nearly-equal benefits involving inheritance, medical issues, adoption and state taxation.
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  2. bimbette
    • 2008 April 20, Charles Mcgrath, “A Novelist With a Story Attached”, New York Times:
      The book, which was well-received when it came out in 1995, helped her reputation, making it harder to dismiss her as a literary bimbette and adventuress.
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  3. biotect
    • 2008 April 20, “Build”, New York Times:
      Michael Reynolds, an architect — he calls himself a biotect — living in Taos, N.M., came up with the concept in the mid-’70s.
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  4. bloglingo
    • 2008 April 20, William Safire, “In the Tank”, New York Times:
      This triggered a blast of guilt throughout the MSM. (That initialism is condescending bloglingo for mainstream media, a 1985 coinage by Ralph Nader , whose splintering campaigns brass-collar Democrats consider unsafe at any speed.)
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  5. boops
    • 2008 April 20, Jon Pareles, “Rasps, Boops, Snark and Sartre”, New York Times:
      Santogold, from Brooklyn, may be mocking scene pretensions, defending the creative impulse or both in her single, “L.E.S. Artistes,” with its drumstick-clicking beat, electro boops and dance-rock chorus.
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  6. communitywide
  7. dancemaking
    • 2008 April 20, Rachel Howard, “Step Right Up! 10 Premieres in 3 Days”, New York Times:
      Others, like Mr. Welch and James Kudelka, are established talents whom Mr. Tomasson helped catapult through commissions early in their dancemaking careers.
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  8. decelerations
    • 2008 April 20, “Greener Pastures”, New York Times:
      When you see how efficient your car is, you start driving with more gentle accelerations and decelerations to maximize your efficiency, which is fun.
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  9. deepish
    • 2008 April 20, Robert F. Moss, “And You’ll Be a Man, My Son”, New York Times:
      Asked if he thought Kipling would have liked “My Boy Jack,” Mr. Haig replied, “On one level he would have resented any deepish investigation into his family.”
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  10. dronelike
    • 2008 April 20, Terrence Rafferty, “New Dubliners”, New York Times:
      Bolger conveys that painful ambivalence vividly, with his urgent prose and his obsessive, endlessly circling narrative structure and his persistent, dronelike repetition of that single tantalizing word “home.”
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  11. haberdashed
    • 2008 April 20, Paul Devlin, “Black Star”, New York Times:
      Toward the end of the masterly “Negro With a Hat” (as the Napoleonically haberdashed Garvey was derided by W. E. B. Du Bois), Garvey is quoted as having said: “We were the first Fascists.
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  12. homiest
    • 2008 April 20, “Just In, From Europe”, New York Times:
      You’ll also find a deep-fried rabbit appetizer that owes less to the grand commanders of haute cuisine than to Colonel Sanders; and, homiest of all, a Florentine meatloaf.
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  13. kisho
    • 2008 April 20, Karl Taro Greenfeld, “Animal Shelterer”, New York Times:
      In fascist Japan, it must have been too easy to dismiss prisoners of war as lacking positive kisho, the vitality and personality Morie so prized in his purebred dogs.
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  14. knuckleheaded
  15. lionlike
    • 2008 April 20, Rachel Howard, “Step Right Up! 10 Premieres in 3 Days”, New York Times:
      On a recent Friday the choreographer Margaret Jenkins’s lionlike voice sounded through the vast Christensen Studio.
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  16. martyrlike
    • 2008 April 20, Valerie Steiker, “About a Girl”, New York Times:
      Although Nagel acknowledges that her subject “could be decidedly difficult,” she draws on stories that depict a more martyrlike character — a visit to a convent during which Marie-Thérèse “appeared to be a little angel,” for example.
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  17. midswallow
    • 2008 April 20, Laura Silver, “The Fire, and the Mystery”, New York Times:
      But then Deena blurted out something that stopped me in midswallow.
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  18. minicheeseburgers
    • 2008 April 20, “Just In, From Europe”, New York Times:
      Cozy banquettes, low tables and soft lighting define this plush new area behind the bar at Le Cirque, with wines by the glass, cocktails and a menu of informal smallish plates: croque monsieur, salmon tartare, shrimp tempura, minicheeseburgers.
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  19. minimetropolis
    • 2008 April 20, Mark Viera, “Question of Age Is Getting Old for Paterno”, New York Times:
      He arrived here 58 years ago and helped transform a onetime cow town into a minimetropolis, a former agricultural college into a prominent university and a football program into a national power.
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  20. mowings
  21. newshands
    • 2008 April 20, William Safire, “In the Tank”, New York Times:
      The punditocracy, from ankle-biters to bigfeet, suddenly felt itself caught in a one-sided, enamored state and needed to distance itself from charges of rampant dispensing of what cynical old newshands call “big wet kisses” to a charming fresh face.
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  22. noncorporate
    • 2008 April 20, Frank Rich, “Shoddy! Tawdry! A Televised Train Wreck!”, New York Times:
      For noncorporate taxpayers, Mr. McCain offers such thin gruel as a battle against federal pork (the notorious Alaskan “bridge to nowhere,” earmarked for $223 million in federal highway money, costs less than a day of the war in Iraq) and a temporary suspension of the federal gas tax (a saving of some $2.75 per 15-gallon tank).
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  23. nonmarketplace
    • 2008 April 20, Rob Walker, “Dreaming in Green”, New York Times:
      But that, in fact, is the point: the nonmarketplace context of hypothetical products frees the designer to leapfrog practical-minded meetings about market share and profit margins and the like and to land at the bigger questions: is this something companies should do — or must do?
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  24. nonreflective
  25. nonspam
    • 2008 April 20, Randall Stross, “Struggling to Evade the E-Mail Tsunami”, New York Times:
      For most of us who are not prominent bloggers, our inbox, thankfully, will never become quite so crowded, at least with nonspam messages.
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  26. ofrenda *
    • 2008 April 20, Lisa W. Foderaro, “The Librarians Call It an Anomaly (It Wasn’t Rattling Chains)”, New York Times:
      Mr. Chance, who said he did not believe in ghosts, told Raymundo Rodriguez-Jackson, a clerk who does believe, as he put it, that “entities and spirits can exist.” Mr. Rodriguez-Jackson, who grew up with a grandmother who had an ofrenda in her home, set out to duplicate the image on the tape.
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  27. outhitting
    • 2008 April 20, Jeff Z. Klein And Lew Serviss, “Series Defined: The Goal, the Hit”, New York Times:
      (A correlation of minus-1.0 would have shown an absolute and perfect relationship, while a plus-1.0 would have shown that outhitting the other team inevitably leads to victory.)
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  28. overdecoration
  29. pantoum
    • 2008 April 20, Langdon Hammer, “‘But I Digress’”, New York Times:
      The reader quickly discovers that it is composed as a pantoum: a verse form in which the second and fourth lines of one quatrain become the first and third lines of the next; lines that are part of one sentence loop back in another context, creating a carousel of accidental-seeming conjunctions.
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  30. parmigiano *
    • 2008 April 20, “Just In, From Europe”, New York Times:
      It has 110 seats, a wine room and an old-school menu of veal parmigiano, baked clams, seafood risotto and pan-fried calamari.
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  31. patinaed
    • 2008 April 20, Christopher Gray, “The Vestige of What Might Have Been”, New York Times:
      The space has been roughly used and has little actual ornament, but everything is deliciously intact, patinaed like an old oak table.
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  32. popemobile *
    • 2008 April 20, Fred Bierman, “Backup Is Having a Star Season”, New York Times:
      Seeing Pope Benedict XVI riding in the popemobile around the warning track at Nationals Park on Thursday conjured up images of a bygone tradition when relief pitchers were ferried from the bullpen to the mound in golf carts, a Datsun, motorcycles with sidecars and even a tugboat on wheels.
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  33. postconsumer
    • 2008 April 20, “Learn”, New York Times:
      Paper-towel dispensers are stocked with postconsumer recycled content.
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  34. postscientific
    • 2008 April 20, G. Pascal Zachary, “How Scientific Gains Abroad Pay Off in the U.S.”, New York Times:
      American innovators — with their world-class strengths in product design, marketing and finance — may have a historic opportunity to convert the scientific know-how from abroad into market gains and profits. Mr. Hill views the transition to “the postscientific society” as an unrecognized bonus for American creators of new products and services.
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  35. rabeca
    • 2008 April 20, Jon Pareles, “Rasps, Boops, Snark and Sartre”, New York Times:
      He’s aware of survival struggles, defiance and dance music worldwide — that’s Hugh Cornwell from the Stranglers singing on “Danger Global Warming ” — but his tracks stay lean and grounded, never far away from the rabeca (fiddle) and accordion of northeastern Brazil.
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  36. regrazed
    • 2008 April 20, “Eat”, New York Times:
      Collins practices a grazing methodology known as mob stocking, which involves rotating livestock through small paddocks that are not regrazed until the forage has returned to knee-height.
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  37. semicompleted
  38. shipwide
  39. skywalks
    • 2008 April 20, Christopher Gray, “The Vestige of What Might Have Been”, New York Times:
      In the 1980s, modern towers were built on the south corners of 68th Street and Lexington, connected by skywalks, which have provided some of the character of a college campus.
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  40. softheadedness
    • 2008 April 20, Michael Pollan, “Why Bother?”, New York Times:
      Tell me: How did it come to pass that virtue — a quality that for most of history has generally been deemed, well, a virtue — became a mark of liberal softheadedness?
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  41. squirearchal
    • 2008 April 20, Robert F. Moss, “And You’ll Be a Man, My Son”, New York Times:
      The film tells the story of Jack’s induction and military training; depicts the Kiplings’ squirearchal lifestyle at Bateman’s, their Jacobean manor house in Sussex; and explores the family tensions over Jack’s brave but foolhardy enlistment.
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  42. subscapularis
  43. tiremaker
    • 2008 April 20, Christopher Jensen, “Michelin Giving Up on PAX Run-Flat Tire”, New York Times:
      She said the tiremaker would continue to provide replacements and service to consumers who already had the tires.
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  44. tonalist
  45. traminette
    • 2008 April 20, Howard G. Goldberg, “From Upstate, a Subtle Blend”, New York Times:
      The New York State Agricultural Experiment Station, a Cornell affiliate in Geneva, N.Y., separately bred Cayuga white and traminette grapes years ago.
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  46. ultraripe
    • 2008 April 20, “Eat”, New York Times:
      SERE GRAPES: Though ultraripe wines have been fashionable in the Napa Valley for more than a decade, climate change appears to be forcing the issue.
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  47. unsatiated
  48. wavepiercing
    • 2008 April 20, “Move”, New York Times:
      WATER WINGS: Earthrace, a sleek and futuristic 78-foot, wavepiercing trimaran, is scheduled to leave the Vulkan Shipyard in Sagunto, Spain, later this month for a second attempt at breaking the round-the-world powerboat record (74 days 23 hours 53 minutes) set in 1998.
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Sequestered[edit]