User:Visviva/NYT 20080423

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This is a list of lowercase non-hyphenated single words found in the 2008-04-23 issue of the New York Times which did not have English entries in the English Wiktionary when this list was created (2009-03-13).

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98641 tokens ‧ 72322 valid lowercase tokens ‧ 8876 types ‧ 40 (~ 0.451%) words before cleaning ‧ 

2008-04-23[edit]

  1. aperitivos
    • 2008 April 23, The New York Times, “Dining Briefs”, New York Times:
      The bread is excellent, the lamb chops thick and tasty, and the Negroni menu, an education in the bittersweet strangeness of Italian aperitivos.
      add
  2. brunello *
    • 2008 April 23, Elisabetta Povoledo, “‘Bolt From the Blue’ on a Tuscan Red”, New York Times:
      He and others believe winemakers in the region have been doctoring their brunello for much of the past decade.
      add
  3. comal *
    • 2008 April 23, Mark Bittman, “Sunday Morning, Yucatán”, New York Times:
      All were served on corn tortillas, which Sabrina brushed with lard before browning on the comal, a metal griddle heated with charcoal.
      add
  4. cotija
  5. denuke
    • 2008 April 23, Maureen Dowd, “Wilting Over Waffles”, New York Times:
      It’s like Micronesia telling Russia to denuke.
      add
  6. diglycerides
    • 2008 April 23, Julia Moskin, “The All-Natural Taste That Wasn’t”, New York Times:
      The list includes at least five additives defined by the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization as emulsifiers (propylene glycol esters, lactoglycerides, sodium acid pyrophosphate, mono- and diglycerides); four acidifiers (magnesium oxide, calcium fumarate, citric acid, sodium citrate); tocopherol, a natural preservative; and two ingredients — starch and maltodextrin — that were characterized as fillers by Dr. Gary A. Reineccius, a professor in the department of food science and nutrition at the University of Minnesota and an expert in food additives.
      add
  7. gossipfests
    • 2008 April 23, Michael Cieply, “The Nazi Plot That’s Haunting Tom Cruise and United Artists”, New York Times:
      Still, United Artists’ future will depend on reversing a growing perception — fed by an Internet culture that publicizes notions once confined to lunchtime gossipfests — that the studio took a wrong turn shortly after Ms. Wagner joined Mr. Cruise, her longtime producing partner, in agreeing a year and a half ago to reboot it as their own venture with Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, which had previously owned the company outright.
      add
  8. inchlong
  9. jailyard
    • 2008 April 23, Gilbert King, “Cruel and Unusual History”, New York Times:
      Once the Supreme Court affirmed Utah’s right to eradicate him by rifle, Wilkerson was let into a jailyard where he declined to be blindfolded.
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  10. jetfighters
    • 2008 April 23, Thom Shanker, “Sharpened Tone in Debate Over Culture of Military”, New York Times:
      The push to add surveillance to the war zones may also require a rethinking of how the current crop of jetfighters is outfitted for war, as well as whether to look at low-tech fixes, like using off-the-lot Cessnas outfitted with surveillance gear.
      add
  11. kibbe
    • 2008 April 23, Mark Bittman, “Sunday Morning, Yucatán”, New York Times:
      The sizable Lebanese population has brought kibbe — known as kibi locally — both in its original form and in a delicious one made with pepitas (ground pumpkin seeds).
      add
  12. lactoglycerides
    • 2008 April 23, Julia Moskin, “The All-Natural Taste That Wasn’t”, New York Times:
      The list includes at least five additives defined by the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization as emulsifiers (propylene glycol esters, lactoglycerides, sodium acid pyrophosphate, mono- and diglycerides); four acidifiers (magnesium oxide, calcium fumarate, citric acid, sodium citrate); tocopherol, a natural preservative; and two ingredients — starch and maltodextrin — that were characterized as fillers by Dr. Gary A. Reineccius, a professor in the department of food science and nutrition at the University of Minnesota and an expert in food additives.
      add
  13. marquesita
    • 2008 April 23, Mark Bittman, “Sunday Morning, Yucatán”, New York Times:
      Dutch traders left behind Edam and Gouda (both are sold in many markets), and a common street snack is the marquesita, a thin waffle rolled into a narrow cylinder around grated Edam and eaten out of hand vertically, like an ice cream cone.
      add
  14. masgouf
    • 2008 April 23, Oliver Schwaner-Albright, “A Bit of Old Baghdad With a Western Twist”, New York Times:
      Strangers sat next to one another at two communal tables while waiters set down platters of quzi (lamb shank with almonds and raisins) and masgouf (a whole freshwater fish split open and roasted); friends shared hookahs; and a live band, improbably squeezed into a corner, kept conversation at a playful shout.
      add
  15. neighborhoodlike
    • 2008 April 23, Sana Siwolop, “Shops Claim a Once-Gritty Waterfront”, New York Times:
      While Mr. Schweitzer hopes to keep the center’s neighborhoodlike feel, his company has already spent $3 million on renovations.
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  16. nonpark
    • 2008 April 23, Timothy Williams, “Judge Blocks Overhaul of Union Square Park”, New York Times:
      State law requires that when the public use of a park or section of park is changed to a nonpark use, the change must be approved by state government.
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  17. nonvegetarian
  18. noseful
    • 2008 April 23, Eric Asimov, “German Rieslings, Light and Dry”, New York Times:
      Then there was the light and racy 2006 Grey Slate Kabinett Trocken from Dönnhoff in the Nahe, which had all the wonderful delicacy of a focused, pure kabinett-level riesling while offering a surprising noseful of mineral aromas.
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  19. pepitas
  20. picadillo
    • 2008 April 23, Mark Bittman, “Sunday Morning, Yucatán”, New York Times:
      My friends were already there, munching on tacos, and we joined them, ordering a bit of everything: a kind of salad of nopales (cactus leaves); an incredible mix of poblanos, potatoes and corn; a similar dish with chorizo; some warm mushrooms; a straightforward but quite tasty picadillo, ground meat with carrots and potatoes; and the seasonal romeritos, made from a plant that resembles rosemary but tastes like nettles.
      add
  21. postflight
  22. pumpkinseeds
  23. quzi
    • 2008 April 23, Oliver Schwaner-Albright, “A Bit of Old Baghdad With a Western Twist”, New York Times:
      Strangers sat next to one another at two communal tables while waiters set down platters of quzi (lamb shank with almonds and raisins) and masgouf (a whole freshwater fish split open and roasted); friends shared hookahs; and a live band, improbably squeezed into a corner, kept conversation at a playful shout.
      add
  24. romeritos
    • 2008 April 23, Mark Bittman, “Sunday Morning, Yucatán”, New York Times:
      My friends were already there, munching on tacos, and we joined them, ordering a bit of everything: a kind of salad of nopales (cactus leaves); an incredible mix of poblanos, potatoes and corn; a similar dish with chorizo; some warm mushrooms; a straightforward but quite tasty picadillo, ground meat with carrots and potatoes; and the seasonal romeritos, made from a plant that resembles rosemary but tastes like nettles.
      add
  25. sakura *
    • 2008 April 23, Florence Fabricant, “Calendar”, New York Times:
      Matsuri, 369 West 16th Street, has a cherry blossom (sakura) cocktail (Champagne, plum wine and grenadine with flower garnish) for $18, and a prix fixe dinner for $55.
      add
  26. serrano *
    • 2008 April 23, Mark Bittman, “Sunday Morning, Yucatán”, New York Times:
      There was a salsa verde of tomatillo, onion, cilantro and serrano chilies, and a salsa roja of tomato, chili and onion.
      add
  27. spiralbound
    • 2008 April 23, Melissa Clark, “You Call That Pudding, Grandma?”, New York Times:
      For over a decade, I happily stirred my way through pudding recipes from the most tried-and-true grandmotherly sources I could find: Fannie Farmer and “Joy of Cooking,” Better Homes and Gardens magazine, and spiralbound Junior League cookbooks.
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  28. subscapularis
  29. ultraluxurious
    • 2008 April 23, Melissa Clark, “You Call That Pudding, Grandma?”, New York Times:
      If I wanted an American-style pudding that was ultraluxurious, the trick would be to reduce the cornstarch and increase the eggs and chocolate to compensate for the loss of thickening power.
      add

Sequestered[edit]

  1. halusky
    • 2008 April 23, Florence Fabricant, “Off the Menu”, New York Times:
      Yearning for halusky dumplings, Hungarian flatbread, pirogi, sausage platters or slivovitz chicken?: 667 Fifth Avenue (19th Street), Park Slope, Brooklyn, (718) 285-9425.
      add
  2. kibi *
    • 2008 April 23, Mark Bittman, “Sunday Morning, Yucatán”, New York Times:
      The sizable Lebanese population has brought kibbe — known as kibi locally — both in its original form and in a delicious one made with pepitas (ground pumpkin seeds).
      add